Plastic Anchors in Drywall Ceiling?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by GimmeSlack12, Dec 2, 2013.

  1. GimmeSlack12 macrumors 603

    GimmeSlack12

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #1
    Any contractors or experienced handy men out there?

    Over the weekend I was working on a small project for a friend. I was hanging speakers from the ceiling and used expanding plastic anchors screwed into 1/2" drywall ceiling.

    The speakers are 15lbs each and there are 4 screws (#10 1-1/2") & anchors (these). I've now done a little reading and it seems this is generally not a good idea for heavy loads. My question is what is a heavy load considered?

    The load ratings I've found on these anchors says 10lbs, so I figure if the load is 15lbs distributed over 4 anchors, that each have a load of about ~4lbs. I'm quite prepared to go fix this, but was wondering if anyone has any thoughts.

    I'm all ears.
     
  2. rdowns macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2003
    #2
    They'll probably hold. I would have used toggle bolts.
     
  3. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Colorado
    #3
    I would have used toggle bolts as well. But I think it will hold for you GimmeSlack12.
     
  4. Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2008
    Location:
    Flea Bottom, King's Landing
    #4
    I'm not a handyman, nor do I play one on TV. But I am a home owner who's had some experience with dry wall crumbling under load.:(

    In my experience, most of these anchors assume a vertical installation. Installing anchors into the ceiling...well...I wouldn't do it.
     
  5. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #5
    Ya I agree the wall helps with the lower support. There will be more load on the ceiling even if it is even. Any way to screw into the joists themselves. At least try to hit one or 2 of them.
     
  6. scapegoat81 macrumors 6502a

    scapegoat81

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2012
    Location:
    Philly
    #6
    Carpenter here for 13+ years. Hilti makes a great wall anchor called zip toggles. I don't think that's the actual name that's on the box but they have like a 200+ lb. rating in 1/2" drywall & up to 500 lb for masonry. I use them all the time on commercial jobs & they stand the test of time.
    [​IMG]
     
  7. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #7
    You still want to drill into the stud as much as possible. Anchors are a last resort.
     
  8. scapegoat81 macrumors 6502a

    scapegoat81

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2012
    Location:
    Philly
    #8
    Agreed but the OP asked about which type of anchors to use which assuming he already figured he couldn't drill into joists/studs.
     
  9. MacNut macrumors Core

    MacNut

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2002
    Location:
    CT
    #9
    Do anchors work the same in a ceiling as they do in a wall? Isn't the support different.
     
  10. GimmeSlack12 thread starter macrumors 603

    GimmeSlack12

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #10
    I appreciate this advice, don't think I need a 200lb load though. But one day when I do I'll know where to turn to.

    All of the advice provided has been very helpful. I will do a follow up on the speakers as I'm sure some adjustments to their directivity may be needed.

    Drilling into the joists wasn't possible at the mounting locations. Would have been definitely my first choice.

    Thanks guys.
     
  11. scapegoat81 macrumors 6502a

    scapegoat81

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2012
    Location:
    Philly
    #11
    I know u dont need that much weight capacity but i like to overkill when it comes to wall anchors cuz u never know. Good luck bud

    ----------

    Theoretically, yes. Would i do it in my house ? No. But, if the drywall/plaster was installed correctly, u shouldn't have a problem. I was initially going to suggest to the OP to mount on the walls but over the years I've learned to just go w/ whatever the customer wants cuz they know "where it would look best".
     
  12. Gregg2 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    #12
    Well, is your friend's ceiling someone else's floor?

    If you have four anchors, it's not likely all four will fail simultaneously. So if one fails, it's time for plan B.

    By the way, what is your friend's floor? If carpet and pad, that will cushion the fall.
     
  13. carlgo macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2006
    #13
    Those Hilti things are great. Regular toggles work well too. These are the safe choices.

    You can spend an hour in the anchor section of a hardware department! At the very least you would want to use anchors that actually screw in. You can kind of tell which ones will be more secure, and some proudly advertise their abilities.

    Note that the hole size must be perfect as the manufacturer instructs, can't just use a random bit that is sorta close. And it has to be drilled cleanly and straight.
     
  14. GimmeSlack12 thread starter macrumors 603

    GimmeSlack12

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #14
    No floors above, it's the top unit. Even if it wasn't I'm not sure why this would be a concern considering there's almost always a joist space.
     
  15. senseless macrumors 68000

    senseless

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2008
    Location:
    Pennsylvania, USA
    #15
    I've had bad luck with anchors in drywall with heavier loads like speakers. Always find a joist or stud to screw into. Otherwise, the anchor may eventually pull through the drywall, regardless of the anchor's weight rating.
     
  16. Arran macrumors 68040

    Arran

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2008
    Location:
    Atlanta, USA
    #16
    I'd agree. The blue conical anchors you linked to are for walls. Their surface looks pretty smooth - so there's nothing to grip the sheetrock securely. Playing thumping bass through the speakers could work them loose and gravity will do the rest. :eek:
     
  17. GimmeSlack12 thread starter macrumors 603

    GimmeSlack12

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #17
    Although the speakers are only 5" cones, I've been getting a bit paranoid myself and will go replace them with toggle bolts over the weekend. I figure it's only a matter of time and best fix it now.
     
  18. Gregg2 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    #18
    Vibrations - from footsteps, judo practice, etc.
     
  19. GimmeSlack12 thread starter macrumors 603

    GimmeSlack12

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #19
    Gotcha, duly noted.
     
  20. koa macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2005
    Location:
    Hawaii
    #20
    There's also another brand of these in the same aisle in Home Depot (actually some home depots are not carrying Hilti stuff). They look just like the one pictured but have a barb on one end of the toggle so you can use that with a pair of pliers to turn it and basically drill/dig through the drywall. Finding a stud is better but these work.

    To easily find a stud get a cheap rare earth magnet and move it around until it holds. That will be a drywall screw that is screwed into a stud (usually 16" on center to the next one).
     
  21. Darth.Titan macrumors 68030

    Darth.Titan

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2007
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    #21
    For ceilings, toggle bolts are best if you can't hit a joist. For light speakers, I'd also be comfortable with anchors like these.

    I use those a lot because they're much sturdier than the standard conical anchors. They're rated up to 50 pounds.
     
  22. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #22
    Me too. The problem with hanging from the ceiling with the press in or screw in style anchors is that it's not a load perpendicular to the wall, but hanging from the ceiling, I imagine it could pull out easier in this orientation. Toggle bolts will hold no doubts.
     

Share This Page