Post Your "About This Linux/BSD" Screenshots...

SandboxGeneral

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I'm curious how many MacRumors members are using Linux as their daily drivers, or backup drivers.

Maybe you have it running natively on a Mac or a PC, or even in a virtual machine.

Here is my main PC's "About" screenshot.

about.png


If you aren't sure how to get this information on your Linux machine, search your distro's repository for 'neofetch'. It's probably in every major repo.

This is running natively on an Alienware X51 R3 PC with MX Linux and the i3 Window Manager.
 

SandboxGeneral

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Is there any reason you wanted to replace the Raspberry PI for your Pi-hole? Was the RP not reliable?
The RPi has been very reliable and running for a few years with zero problems.

The only thing about it is that, obviously, it's a low power device and because I have over 4 million domains on the block list, when I make changes to it, for example the white list or black list, it takes a minute or so to complete. I am by no means complaining about that at all.

But, I had the Mac mini not doing anything but sitting around beginning to collect dust. So I thought why not re-purpose it and put some power to the Pi-hole? The RPi also served as not only the DNS but also the DHCP server for me.

So I wiped macOS off of the mini and put a base Debian install on it and then reloaded Pi-Hole and my configs on it.

That's the only real reason I did it.
 

steve217

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The RPi has been very reliable and running for a few years with zero problems.

The only thing about it is that, obviously, it's a low power device and because I have over 4 million domains on the block list, when I make changes to it, for example the white list or black list, it takes a minute or so to complete. I am by no means complaining about that at all.

But, I had the Mac mini not doing anything but sitting around beginning to collect dust. So I thought why not re-purpose it and put some power to the Pi-hole? The RPi also served as not only the DNS but also the DHCP server for me.

So I wiped macOS off of the mini and put a base Debian install on it and then reloaded Pi-Hole and my configs on it.

That's the only real reason I did it.
Makes sense. I just set up Pi-hole (awesome tool! Donate!) on an RPi and was curious about reliability.
 
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SandboxGeneral

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Finally got all the parts I wanted for my new PC today. I have it up and running (posting this from it right now) with all my files moved over and most of my services setup. Just a bit more ricing and configuring to do and I'm good to go.

Screenshot_2019-08-24_17-19-31.png
 
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steve217

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Nov 11, 2011
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Finally got all the parts I wanted for my new PC today. I have it up and running (posting this from it right now) with all my files moved over and most of my services setup. Just a bit more ricing and configuring to do and I'm good to go.

View attachment 854541
Nice! Ryzen power. That's what I picked for my current build.

upload_2019-8-25_8-40-17.png


PS - thanks for the tip about MX Linux. It's a pretty nifty distro.
 
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SandboxGeneral

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Nice! Ryzen power. That's what I picked for my current build.

View attachment 854601

PS - thanks for the tip about MX Linux. It's a pretty nifty distro.
MX is a nice distro, an excellent fork of Debian and not Ubuntu. Though I never really used it's DE and lived in i3 while I used it. But it was stable and the repo's had pretty much everything I needed. There's good reason MX has been on the top of the list at distrowatch.com for a while.

I do like the Ryzen CPU's for sure. I have a Ryzen 5 1600 in my FreeNAS server and it's been solid for the 18 months or so since I built it. Yesterday once I got my new build done and was transferring my files from the older Alienware PC to it over the network (Ethernet) the Ryzen 7 3800X was hardly working at all. I used Syncthing to mange the file transfer and was watching the CPU's and RAM metrics on both PC's. The older Intel I7 was working a little harder than the Ryzen even though it was only sending data not receiving it. I moved maybe around 100 GB in few minutes very smoothly.
 
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SandboxGeneral

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Nice. BSD always welcome too!

I still have yet to play with BSD and learn it. It's on my list though.
 

SandboxGeneral

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If you ever do decide to dabble in FreeBSD, think about migrating Pi-hole to run in a jail.

You strike me as the sort of Uber-geek who could pull this off.
Thanks for the vote of confidence! However, I'm not a programmer really so porting a program from one OS to another is way out of my scope of talent.

But I love the ideas posed in that thread. I run pfSense at home too, and it would be very cool to have Pi-hole as a plugin or a jail on pfSense.

Playing with BSD is something I intend on doing soonish. I just built a new machine for testing stuff on so that I don't have to use my daily driver or even VM's to test certain things. I plan on doing a blog post on the new machine in the next week or two. The first thing I'm going to play with this weekend on it is XCP-ng, the open-source version of Citrix's Xen Server. I have v7.6 installed on it as of the other night, but couldn't get the latest version, v8, to load. It seems there are some hardware compatibility issues with the AMD CPU and the Vega graphics it has built in that I happen to have in there.

But before I get to messing with BSD, and after I play with XCP-ng for a bit, I think my next project will be to install and compile Gentoo Linux.
 
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