Preventing keyboard marks on macbook screen

pjny

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Feb 18, 2010
737
133
Hi,

My old 2015 Macbook left some pretty strong keyboard marks on the screen.

Is there anyway to prevent this from happening with my 2019 Macbook 13"? I don'tw ant to have to put a sheet over the keyboard every time. I do put the laptop case and I then transport the laptop in a packed bag. I am not sure if the slightest pressure in a bag can cause the keys to push agains the screen and cause impressions on the screen.

How do you avoid having your screen ruined.

Thanks.

https://www.amazon.com/Ruggard-Ultra-Laptop-Sleeve-Black/dp/B006TZH7NS
 

jbachandouris

macrumors 601
Aug 18, 2009
4,481
1,407
Upstate NY
First of all, there's already a recent thread discussing this exact same issue.

Secondly, putting a sheet on the keyboard is precisely what I have done.

I suppose you could hope for the best...
 

Howard2k

macrumors 68030
Mar 10, 2016
2,574
1,831
I use a microfibre cloth between the keyboard and screen. Quick and easy.
 

pjny

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Feb 18, 2010
737
133
Hi can you post link to recent thread? i searched for "keyboard" and "screen" and a variation of keywords earlier but couldn't find.

First of all, there's already a recent thread discussing this exact same issue.

Secondly, putting a sheet on the keyboard is precisely what I have done.

I suppose you could hope for the best...
 
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leman

macrumors G3
Oct 14, 2008
9,974
4,553
I’ve seen it quite often on pre-2016 mac laptops, but newer models with shallower keys seem to be largely free from this problem. That said, the best thing you can do probably is avoid pressure on the laptop during transport.
 

smirking

macrumors 68020
Aug 31, 2003
2,175
1,585
Silicon Valley
I had lots of keyboard marks on my 2016 MBP. I have a 2018 now and so far no keyboard marks. I always had a bit of marking on my 2016, but it didn't get really bad until I stopped cleaning the keyboard and it got really oily and ended up transferring the oils to the screen permanently. I was experimenting to see if I could get they keyboard to fail by being an absolute slob and not practicing any form of hygiene around it.

No, I'm not crazy or stupid. I had a failing battery and would get a new keyboard when the topcase got replaced so I thought I'd put my belief that the keyboard is not fundamentally flawed to the test. I completely let it go for a month. It got nasty. I aborted the trial after a month because it was getting a little too gross for me. They keyboard got super nasty, but didn't fail. Unfortunately, the screen got all sorts of marks on it that I couldn't wipe off.

Luckily, they also considered the marks on the screen as damage covered under Applecare and they replaced the screen for me as well when I finally brought it in for a new battery.

So, you might be able to get away by simply keeping your keyboard clean from excessive oil and grime build up and wipe down your screen once in a while too.
 
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Fishrrman

macrumors P6
Feb 20, 2009
17,194
5,543
A "packed bag"?
How much pressure is on the MacBook (from either side) when "packed" ...???
 

smirking

macrumors 68020
Aug 31, 2003
2,175
1,585
Silicon Valley
A "packed bag"?
How much pressure is on the MacBook (from either side) when "packed" ...???
I've actually considered this being a possiblity of how my previous MBP got so many marks on it. I think this is quite possible because of the way laptop bags are designed. Most are not designed for thin devices. The laptop is typically in the innermost pocket closest to your body. I guess the rationale is that they want it least likely to suffer damage from glancing blows to the bag, but by that it's basically resting against your body, everytime it gets bumped or jostled, it's whacking against you somewhere. If the bag is full, like with with a rolled up sweatshirt that's a little too big for the bag, that's probably applying pressure right at the center of the bag and if it's applying pressure on the back of the screen, it's probably pushing it slightly into the keyboard.
 

pshufd

macrumors 65816
Oct 24, 2013
1,302
880
New Hampshire
I've actually considered this being a possiblity of how my previous MBP got so many marks on it. I think this is quite possible because of the way laptop bags are designed. Most are not designed for thin devices. The laptop is typically in the innermost pocket closest to your body. I guess the rationale is that they want it least likely to suffer damage from glancing blows to the bag, but by that it's basically resting against your body, everytime it gets bumped or jostled, it's whacking against you somewhere. If the bag is full, like with with a rolled up sweatshirt that's a little too big for the bag, that's probably applying pressure right at the center of the bag and if it's applying pressure on the back of the screen, it's probably pushing it slightly into the keyboard.
My Swissgear bag (it was specially designed for the 2008 17 inch MBP) has four cushions that go next to your body. One long on the bottom, one short up top and two on the side. There's a padded sleeve to hold a laptop (it could probably hold two as the old ones were a lot thicker). So lots of protection in this old bag. For extra protection, you could use another thin sleeve to put in the laptop pocket.