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Starting with macOS Ventura, released this week, the built-in Preview app on Mac no longer supports PostScript (.ps) and Encapsulated PostScript (.eps) files, according to a new Apple support document. Preview can still be used to open these files on macOS Monterey and earlier. Apple did not provide a reason for the change.

Adobe-PostScript-PS-File.jpeg

Apple recommends using other third-party Mac apps that can view or convert PostScript files. It also remains possible to print .ps and .eps files by dragging them into a Mac's printer queue with these steps on macOS Ventura, according to Apple:
1. Choose Apple menu  > System Settings, then click Printers & Scanners in the sidebar.
2. Click the the name of your printer on the right.
3. Click the Printer Queue button to open the printer queue window.
4. Drag the .ps or .eps file into the printer queue window.
Developed by Adobe in the 1980s, the .ps and .eps file formats were once widely used for desktop publishing/printing purposes. PostScript was the basis of rendering on the NeXT operating system, and was mostly replaced by the PDF format in Mac OS X.

Article Link: Preview App on macOS Ventura Drops Support for PostScript Files
 
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jorgk

macrumors regular
Mar 20, 2013
109
42
I several fields of natural sciences, Mac's are (soon were?) predominating.
Indeed, many scientific journals require authors to send in their pictures/graphics as .eps, preferably.
Seems Apple has no interest in these customers.
 

4nNtt

macrumors 6502a
Apr 13, 2007
689
400
Chicago, IL
I suspect this is security related. PostScript is basically a programming language and could make some software vulnerable. I recall a toy program implemented in postscript ages ago. There may have been the possibility of Unicode hacks that could result in arbitrary code execution, etc.
 
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sugilbert

macrumors newbie
Aug 19, 2016
22
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South Bend, IN
Not that I use either, but it seems from the above comments, there are a lot of people still using them.
I just checked, and the Preview version is still the same: 11.0 (although the parenthetic #'s may be different)
 

Shirasaki

macrumors G5
May 16, 2015
14,109
8,791
Looks like Apple is doubling down on dumbing down macOS.
Yeah. That’s one way to merge iPadOS with macOS, by making macOS weaker overtime.
Instead of lifting iOS to the level of macOS, they continue to bring the macOS level down to iOS/iPadOS.
Yeah, also a way to compensate the inabilities of iOS/iPadOS.
And a direction I have sensed a While ago but didn’t want to accept.
What‘s the appeal of macbook if It can’t do work better than iPadOS? Plus It cant even run most popular iOS apps!
 
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Shirasaki

macrumors G5
May 16, 2015
14,109
8,791
Security, almost certainly, because obviously the chips can still handle it.

This is probably a security move. Old formats seem Like they would make a great way to slip in under the radar.
So my old MacBook Air becomes more and more valuable as time goes on huh… in a weird way.
Apple could’ve virtualised the preview of those files or sth. But figured removing support saves tons of money.
How about using the money that was wasted on stage manager in macOS to provide some support on this issue?
 

Wildkraut

Suspended
Nov 8, 2015
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Yeah. That’s one way to merge iPadOS with macOS, by making macOS weaker overtime.

And a direction I have sensed a While ago but didn’t want to accept.
What‘s the appeal of macbook if It can’t do work better than iPadOS? Plus It cant even run most popular iOS apps!
Yep, just like the subpar backwards compatibility, breaking older Apps and pushing subscriptions.
 
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