Question on ssd restore shortcut or not?

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by philipma1957, Oct 7, 2010.

  1. philipma1957 macrumors 603

    philipma1957

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Location:
    Howell, New Jersey
    #1
    http://www.lindy-usa.com/usb-2-esata-docking-cloning-station-for-25-35-sata-hard-drives/42797.html

    http://www.lindy-usa.com/lindyshop/manuals/42797V5.pdf

    this more for a business user then a hobbyist. The piece of gear above can do a stand alone clone.

    so rather then all the steps a mac user does to restore his ssd. If you buy 1 extra ssd and partition it for mac gui then load only a disc install of osx. then keep it on the side and use it to clone the empty space of all the factory settings to a used ssd is the used ssd reset to factory settings?

    alternatively if you just partition the spare ssd with mac gui/hfs and when the time comes clone it to the used ssd.

    I know you need one extra ssd but if you are running a business it would be a very simple method to restore. I wanted to put this in the how to restore a ssd to factory settings thread but could not find it.

    It seems to me since the "new" ssd has just about zero info or just a basic osx the rest is still in Virgin (empty untouched) status from the factory. would a bit by bit cloner such as the linked one convey this to the used ssd?
     
  2. VirtualRain macrumors 603

    VirtualRain

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    #2
    If I understand correctly, you are proposing that you can clone a factory fresh SSD to a used SSD, thereby reconditioning it?

    I suspect this idea is based on a technique some people use to perform (and maybe still do) to restore a mechanical drive to an operational state with minimal defragmentation.

    But SSD NAND is not like fragmentation of files... and therefore this technique won't do anything to help a used SSD. Bit copying data from one SSD to another, does nothing to the state of the underlying NAND. Only a lower level NAND management process that operates beneath the data layer such as TRIM or the Secure Erase ATA command can effectively mark previously used NAND blocks as free.
     
  3. philipma1957 thread starter macrumors 603

    philipma1957

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Location:
    Howell, New Jersey
    #3
    I suspected as much it would be too easy a solution. Thanks
     

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