remove or let live

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by jeyf, Jun 11, 2018.

  1. jeyf macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    #1
    Should i remove the plant?
    A 1960's built home located Denver CO; there is a moderate ivy vine growing on on an outside brick wall.

    -as the vine looks nice, has large brilliant green leaves, shades the house from direct sun I am not apposed to keeping the vine. Inside, looking out a window you see these large bright green leaves partially frame another otherwise brown on brown land.

    -Neighbors say these plants attach with suction cups and is not invasive to the brick.

    -the brick is solid w/o cracks. The mortar is a modern chemical base with good adhesion.

    -I intend keep limit the vine's growth to the North wall.

    -the vine needs weekly watering, not an issue but it is close to the foundation.

    -Denver is a high land desert environment. Not unusual to have 9% humidity for weeks on end. The temperature seems to vary 30 degrees every day and summer high temp can be 100F, winter -10F, harsh. So difficult to get things to grow here. This vine is on a few neighbor's houses. Seems to thrive.

    -there is a ebb and flow of things here and you can see where the vine was a few years ago. The dead suction cups are difficult to remove.

    -would need to remove the vine off the trim as in places the trim needs paint and carpentry. Some of the trim has some none white odd color and this needs to go
     
  2. AlliFlowers Contributor

    AlliFlowers

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Location:
    L.A. (Lower Alabama)
    #2
    I'd keep it. Sounds like it does far more good than harm.
     
  3. old mac Suspended

    old mac

    Joined:
    May 16, 2011
  4. 0007776 Suspended

    0007776

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2006
    Location:
    Somewhere
  5. jbarley macrumors 68040

    jbarley

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2006
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    #5
    My wife is the gardener and has always liked vines.
    This is a photo of our home taken in early fall a few years back.
    I used to have to climb up on the roof twice a year and trim the growth off of the chimney because the vine, if left unchecked would grow right up and over the top and onto the roof where it could be a fire hazard as I burn wood in the winter.
    If you look closely you can see the little dead parts (suction cups) left on the chimney.
    Unfortunately there came a time when I no longer felt safe up on the roof (I'm 82) so the vine had to be killed and is now just a dead skeleton, not as spectacular as it was, but still bearable.
    The dead skeleton had to be left in place because there is no way to successfully clean it off the house which is finished with a colored glass and rock dash type stucco.
    Later on just before the leaves would fall it would turn completely dark flame red and was very attractive.


    DSCN3016.JPG
     
  6. old mac Suspended

    old mac

    Joined:
    May 16, 2011
    #6
    That's impressive.
     
  7. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #7
    Ivy vines are attractive, but seem to be a commitment, as once you take them off, my impression you are left with an ugly mess. I would never choose to have ivy all over my house, althiugh I find it interesting that it might shield the house from the Sun.

    So since you are in the house with established ivy, as long as it’s confirmed not to degrade the mortar, I’d probably keep it. What about it being a home for bugs?
     
  8. jbarley macrumors 68040

    jbarley

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2006
    Location:
    Vancouver Island
    #8
    Never had any issues with bugs, but the birds sure liked it for nesting, mostly finches and a few sparrows.
     
  9. jeyf thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2009
    #9
    fewer bugs in Denver than expected; climate is to dry last few years.

    bird life is also lower than expected, especially the city. I have a bird feeder but no where on the property to put it...
    -lots of squirrels and they get into every thing, even the alley trash bins, i put apple stickers on the bins but still
    -i bought the seed on discount so they will germinate if they fall onto the ground, nothing like have a stalk of corn in the middle of the tiny patch of grass i have
    -birds are messy and neighbors might not appreciate it on their cars
    -i considered putting the feeder on roof
     
  10. scubachap macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2016
    Location:
    UK
    #10
    I think it depends on the sort of ivy. The one in the picture (j Barley) is I think what we'd call Virginia Creeper (?) and can be lovely. Our English Ivy (I don't know if you have it across the pond) can be a real pain. It can damage brickwork.

    If you have that and you want to get rid of it by peeling it off - do it while it's alive as it comes off reasonably cleanly. Don't do what I did and kill it first thinking it will all be a lot easier to get off. It isn't - dead, it welds itself to the surface and then takes the mortar with it. (A last act of defiance I guess!)
     
  11. Zenithal macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #11
    I dislike all ivy. If it were me, I'd remove it and then treat its roots directly with a chemical to kill them.
     
  12. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Location:
    Sailing beyond the sunset
    #12
    "To the last I grapple with thee; from Mortar's heart I stab at thee; for hate's sake I spit my last tendrils at thee!"
     

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