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Apple has developed the chip modules and packages for the autopilot functions of its rumored Apple Car with the help of an outsourced semiconductor assembly and test (OSAT) company based in South Korea, claims a new report today.

vanarama-apple-car-concept.jpg
Apple Car concept by Vanarama based on patents filed by Apple

OSAT is a service that suppliers often provide to partners that involves semiconductor assembly, packaging and testing of integrated circuits. According to TheElec, the project started last year and is expected to be completed in 2023.
The South Korean OSAT firm was working on the module for a chip that operates the autopilot function, much like those used by Tesla, sources said.

Such chips, which oversee AI computations, usually integrate a neural processing unit, CPU, GPU, memory as well as camera interface among other functions.
The project is said to be led by Apple's regional offices in South Korea. According to the report, Apple's offices received the bill of material (BOM) rights for the project and chose the South Korean OSAT firm to fulfill the order.

TheElec links the move with Foxconn's construction of all-electric vehicle plants in the U.S. and Thailand, which the report claims will provide the assembly line for Apple Car. Foxconn says it aims to have the plants operational by 2023, but the suggestion that they will be used by Apple to mass produce its autonomous vehicle has not been corroborated.

Apple has reportedly been in the process of selecting suppliers for its long-rumored electric vehicle since December last year, when Apple representatives are said to have visited South Korea to meet with local suppliers, following a preliminary visit in the summer of 2021.

Apple's interest in Korean manufacturers has purportedly led to a heated battle to secure a place in Apple's supply chain, with Apple particularly interested in Korea's battery manufacturing capabilities.

According to previous reports, Apple is expected to complete the selection of suppliers for its vehicle by the end of this year, after which it will start full-scale development and mass production within the next two to three years.

Reuters believes Apple is aiming to begin production on a car in 2024, but Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo believes it will be 2025 to 2027 at the earliest before an Apple Car is ready for launch. Kuo said he would not be surprised to see the launch schedule extended to 2028 or later.

According to Bloomberg's Mark Gurman, work on the Apple Car is in the early stages, but Apple is aiming for a 2025 launch.

Article Link: Report: Apple Developing Apple Car Autopilot Function With South Korean Partner
 

MacWorld78

macrumors 6502a
Jul 25, 2012
578
339
I would buy a electric car as long it can do this concept.

Removable battery pack - go to Station (like petrol station) remove the battery from the car like a long cubic shape and put them into the charging dock, pay for the fresh battery and install back to the car and drive off (all done in between 2-5 mins).

Just pay for the battery performance as low/medium/long mileages - that figure should include AC heater/cooling.
 
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lowkey

macrumors 6502a
Jul 16, 2002
704
609
australia
I would buy a electric car as long it can do this concept.

Removable battery pack - go to Station (like petrol station) remove the battery from the car like a long cubic shape and put them into the charging dock, pay for the fresh battery and install back to the car and drive off.

Just pay for the battery performance as low/medium/long mileages - that figure should include AC heater/cooling.
Um yeah sure. So somehow all electric car manufacturers must agree on battery size, weight, connection standards and performance for you to buy an electric car?

Why would tesla give up it’s decade lead on Apple and just gift them their battery technology?

Do you really need to drive more than 500km in a day and not take a 20m break at a supercharger?

You can drive an electric car tomorrow if you like. You don’t need to wait for a universal standard for batteries and distribution to magically come in to existence.
 

multipasser

macrumors member
Dec 11, 2010
99
166
Well.. yes wait for iCar X before you will be satisfied. Just like all iphones before X, they had all annoying things that are worked out now. It takes time. Guess the first cars will be horrors :)
 

T'hain Esh Kelch

macrumors 603
Aug 5, 2001
5,809
6,112
Denmark
I wonder if Apple is actually capable of doing what other companies haven't been able to do so far; create a fully autonomously car. My guess is no.
 

ghanwani

macrumors 68040
Dec 8, 2008
3,483
3,980
Given what they have been to producing lately, I expect to be thoroughly underwhelmed by the Apple Car, assuming it doesn’t go the way of AirPower.
 
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MacWorld78

macrumors 6502a
Jul 25, 2012
578
339
Um yeah sure. So somehow all electric car manufacturers must agree on battery size, weight, connection standards and performance for you to buy an electric car?

Why would tesla give up it’s decade lead on Apple and just gift them their battery technology?

Do you really need to drive more than 500km in a day and not take a 20m break at a supercharger?

You can drive an electric car tomorrow if you like. You don’t need to wait for a universal standard for batteries and distribution to magically come in to existence.

Yes, I agree that all car manufacture should set standard size for the battery pack to be removable & regulation rules.

Tesla have amazing battery performance but surly other company who can make outstanding battery performance then Tesla and its good idea not to feel trap or buying power.

The problems with supercharger this will decrease the battery performance overtime. Higher mileage is damn useful if you are stuck traffic the battery will go quickly down because you're using air conditions.
 
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Karma*Police

macrumors 68020
Jul 15, 2012
2,244
2,135
Yes, I agree that all car manufacture should set standard size for the battery pack to be removable & regulation rules.

Tesla have amazing battery performance but surly other company who can make outstanding battery performance then Tesla and its good idea not to feel trap or buying power.

The problems with supercharger this will decrease the battery performance overtime. Higher mileage is damn useful if you are stuck traffic the battery will go quickly down because you're using air conditions.
Regulations will stifle innovation, increase the cost of doing business, and increase cost for consumers in the form of higher taxes and cost of vehicles. The gov’t should do the bare minimum to ensure public safety but otherwise stay out of the way.

Let the car companies compete and produce better cars. If standards are warranted, companies generally get together to create them without gov’t intervention. Look at USB-C, for example.
 

ArtOfWarfare

macrumors G3
Nov 26, 2007
9,382
5,663
Once autopilot tech becomes good enough, why would anyone want an Apple Car, when they could have an Audi/BMW/Jaguar etc.?

Once smartphones become good enough, why would anyone want an iPhone when they could have a Samsung/Blackberry/Nokia, etc?

Although you're kind of right from the sound of this article... it doesn't sound like Apple is actually interested in doing anything but slapping a badge on a car. Strange that Apple finds even this so challenging.
 
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jz0309

Contributor
Sep 25, 2018
5,724
16,072
Temecula, CA
That concept is ugly, just like the headset ...
Given the recent history of Tesla recalls, I think the "SW Central" approach to automotive will get some scrutiny, given Apple's recent history of OS releases and bugs, where is this going?
 
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IIGS User

macrumors 6502a
Feb 24, 2019
759
1,967
I would buy a electric car as long it can do this concept.

Removable battery pack - go to Station (like petrol station) remove the battery from the car like a long cubic shape and put them into the charging dock, pay for the fresh battery and install back to the car and drive off (all done in between 2-5 mins).

Just pay for the battery performance as low/medium/long mileages - that figure should include AC heater/cooling.

One of the biggest issues people cite for not switching to electric cars is "range anxiety", which I think is more than reasonable. Having some way to swap out battery packs on a long trip, or when you can't get to a charger would go a long way towards that.

Two instances where an electric car wouldn't have worked for me and mine recently would have been a driving trip to Indiana from Philadelphia for a wedding during the pandemic. Even if we were interested in getting on a plane, we really couldn't afford it so driving was the only way for us to go. And yes, my wife drove it straight through refusing my offer to take a shift. There was really no way to accomplish this trip with an EV. We took a similar trip in January of last year to visit a sick family member in Ohio. There was no way we would have made this trip in an EV without stopping, which all we stopped for was gas and drive through.

Someone mentioned the supercharger route. I believe they are proprietary to Tesla only, so unless you have the coin for a Tesla, you're SOL. My wife has a Chevy Malibu, which is the best she could afford.

I'm a car & tech guy, and the EV's offered now look like they are a hoot to drive everything else aside. I'm sure I will own one someday. But not right now.

There's a lot of North America where 300 miles is a round trip to Wal Mart, broadband internet is non existent, and electric cars and pickups are simply not practical forms of transportation in their current form. This will change as the technology and charging infrastructure matures, but it's going to take longer than people think, IMHO.
 
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