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OWC this week is announcing the newest member of its family of "extreme performance drives," the ThunderBlade V4. The ThunderBlade V4 is an external drive targeted at professional users who need the fastest possible speeds, and it packs four M.2 solid state drive blades into a single enclosure that runs over Thunderbolt 3, with total capacities ranging from 1 TB to 8 TB. The result is what OWC says is the "fastest SSD ever made," with read speeds topping out at 2800 MB/s and write speeds up to 2450 MB/s.

thunderblade_v4_mbp.jpg

We've spent a bit of time with the ThunderBlade V4, and it's definitely an impressive piece of technology, although its pricing that starts at $1200 and rises significantly from there will limit the potential market. This is an accessory for demanding professionals who need to squeeze every bit of performance out of their external drives and is undoubtedly overkill for consumers simply looking to back up their computers.

Design

The ThunderBlade V4 comes in a hefty aluminum enclosure covered in large fins to help with heat dissipation, as this drive can get fairly warm when you're reading and writing a lot of data. There is no active cooling in the drive, which helps with the ThunderBlade V4's ruggedness as there are no moving parts.

The ThunderBlade V4 measures just under 5 inches wide, a little over 7.5 inches deep, and just over an inch high. It weighs a little under two pounds, which gives it a solid feel and good stability on a desk. A separate power adapter also adds some bulk to deal with elsewhere.

thunderblade_v4_front.jpg

The only feature on the front of the ThunderBlade V4 is a thin three-inch long LED that shines white when connected to power (and also when connected to a sleeping computer) and blue when the drive has an active connection to a computer. While the LED appears to be a single thin indicator, it's actually made up of four distinct segments, one for each M.2 drive in the ThunderBlade.

Each segment will blink blue when data is being written to or read from the corresponding drive. With the speed of the drive and the four onboard SSDs, you'll see a sort of flickering ripple effect across the LED as data is moved.

An ambient light sensor on the rear of the ThunderBlade V4 dims the front LED in dark environments.

thunderblade_v4_rear.jpg

In addition to the light sensor, the rear of the ThunderBlade includes a port for the power adapter connection and a pair of Thunderbolt 3 ports. One Thunderbolt 3 port is used to connect the ThunderBlade to your computer using the included 0.5-meter Thunderbolt 3 cable, while the second is available for daisy chaining a display or other peripherals.

The Thunderbolt 3 ports are capable of supplying 15 watts of power each, but that won't be enough to power a MacBook Pro. This isn't intended as a true docking station, however, so it's not surprising that the power output is limited and primarily intended to drive downstream peripherals rather than host computers.

Speed Tests

We ran some QuickBench disk speed tests on the ThunderBlade V4, and while we didn't quite hit OWC's top numbers, the drive still showed some seriously fast performance. Connecting directly to a 2016 15-inch MacBook Pro, we saw read and write performance in the range of 2400 MB/s in extended testing mode with transfer sizes in the 20-100 MB range.

v4_direct_qb.jpg

Similar speed tests using Blackmagic with larger transfer sizes of 5 GB yielded slightly lower speeds of over 1900 MB/s read and 2100 MB/s write, although it is difficult to directly compare the two different methodologies. Even that performance allowed the ThunderBlade to ace Blackmagic's "Will it Work?" rating system that determines whether a drive is fast enough to handle video in various combinations of formats, resolutions, and frame rates.

v4_direct_bm_full.jpg

Results were similar in various configurations even when other peripherals up to and including a pair of LG UltraFine 5K displays were connected to the MacBook Pro's other Thunderbolt 3 ports.

With an LG UltraFine 5K connected to the downstream Thunderbolt 3 port on the ThunderBlade, we obviously saw lower speeds as some of the bandwidth was being dedicated to the display. Write speeds were impacted most significantly, dropping to around 800 MB/s, while read speeds dipped slightly to around 2050 MB/s.

v4_display_qb.jpg

RAID

The four SSDs inside the ThunderBlade V4 come preconfigured in RAID 0 format to offer the full stated capacity of the drive. A license for OWC's SoftRAID XT (formerly SoftRAID Lite) is included with the ThunderBlade, and the software can be used to reformat in RAID 1 to provide mirrored redundancy.

While RAID 0 and 1 give you the option to prioritize storage capacity or data redundancy, it would be nice if some of the higher RAID modes were available on the ThunderBlade to offer more flexibility.

With the downstream Thunderbolt 3 port on the ThunderBlade V4, you can daisy chain multiple units together for even more storage, although you're of course limited by the total bandwidth of the single Thunderbolt 3 connection they're all running over. You can even set up two ThunderBlade V4 units as a single RAID array.

PC Compatibility

While OWC is focused on Macs and the ThunderBlade V4 comes formatted for Mac as a RAID 0 Journaled HFS+ volume, it can also be used with PCs once the drives have been reformatted and reconfigured. Unlike on Mac, however, booting from the ThunderBlade is not supported on Windows.

Pricing and Availability

As should be expected for a product with large storage capacities using the fastest SSD designs and Thunderbolt 3, the ThunderBlade V4 isn't cheap. The 1 TB model is priced at $1199.99, with the 2 TB model at $1799.99, the 4 TB model at $2799.99, and the 8 TB model at $4999.00.

But for professional users who need the absolute fastest external storage, the ThunderBlade V4 looks like a solid option that takes maximum advantage of the bandwidth offered by Thunderbolt 3. All models come with a rugged case, a three-year warranty, and one year of complimentary Level 1 data recovery coverage. All four models will be available from OWC starting January 8.

Note: OWC provided the ThunderBlade V4 to MacRumors for the purposes of this review, and it will be returned to OWC. No other compensation was received. MacRumors is an affiliate partner with OWC and may earn commissions on purchases made through links in this article.

Article Link: Review: OWC's ThunderBlade V4 Offers Blazing Fast External Storage for Professionals
 

SecuritySteve

macrumors demi-god
Jul 6, 2017
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Huh. The iMac Pro SSD has a write speed of 3.3 GB/s and a read speed of 2.8 GB/s so I don't think that claim is true. Maybe fastest external (or portable) SSD?
Yes, I believe they are claiming the latter. Based off my searches, their claim is true, kinda. It is tied with the LaCie Bolt 3, but it is cheaper than that array.
 
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jayducharme

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Jun 22, 2006
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I've been waiting for an external drive like this. OWC makes good TB peripherals. But I'm not willing to pay that amount of cash for it. Hopefully in a few years, the price will moderate. (And of course by then, there will be even better options.)
 
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macduke

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Jun 27, 2007
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Yes, I believe they are claiming the latter. Based off my searches, their claim is true, kinda. It is tied with the LaCie Bolt 3, but it is cheaper than that array.
Yeah, I've been really wrestling with what to do. I upgraded recently to a new camera with 42MP RAW files and I like keeping a copy of my catalog on a portable drive that I can bring with me. Unfortunately the new 2TB portable G-Drive that I picked up for $80 on Amazon is pretty slow for my purposes. I was hoping it would tide me over until SSDs drop down low enough. I'd love to get a portable 2TB SSD for under $500. Even if it's "only" 500MB/s, that's still an order of magnitude faster than my 120MB/s G-Drive. I'm really disappointed at how slowly SSDs have come down in price over the years. At work they capped me at 512GB SSD in my new 5K iMac because the 1TB was too expensive, lol. Current projects are on the drive and everything else is thrown on externals.
 
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SecuritySteve

macrumors demi-god
Jul 6, 2017
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Yeah, I've been really wrestling with what to do. I upgraded recently to a new camera with 42MP RAW files and I like keeping a copy of my catalog on a portable drive that I can bring with me. Unfortunately the new 2TB portable G-Drive that I picked up for $80 on Amazon is pretty slow for my purposes. I was hoping it would tide me over until SSDs drop down low enough. I'd love to get a portable 2TB SSD for under $500. Even if it's "only" 500MB/s, that's still an order of magnitude faster than my 120MB/s G-Drive. I'm really disappointed at how slowly SSDs have come down in price over the years. At work they capped me at 512GB SSD in my new 5K iMac because the 1TB was too expensive, lol. Current projects are on the drive and everything else is thrown on externals.
I believe this drive is not meant to be portable. Judging from it's size you -could- bring it with you, but it has feet on the base there to keep it stationary for a reason.
 
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SecuritySteve

macrumors demi-god
Jul 6, 2017
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California
Hey one question that just occurred to me, these volumes are configured to use HFS+, why not APFS? They are M.2 SSDs after all, and if I reformat them would that ruin the RAID 0 configuration in this drive, or just improve performance?

Edit: I guess that's two questions.
 
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harriska2

macrumors 68000
Mar 16, 2011
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Personally, I’m not interested in ordering from OWC anymore as they don’t cover thefts. Amazon does. We’ll never get our $400 drive back even though the porch pirate was caught.
 
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toke lahti

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Apr 23, 2007
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Gotta love what OWC is doing for mac community that Apple does not do.
Offtopic: Anybody seen any NAS boxes that would use ssd as a cache for slower hdd raid5 storage?
 
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glindon

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Jun 9, 2014
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Hey one question that just occurred to me, these volumes are configured to use HFS+, why not APFS? They are M.2 SSDs after all, and if I reformat them would that ruin the RAID 0 configuration in this drive, or just improve performance?

Edit: I guess that's two questions.
Probably because their raid software doesn’t support APFS yet would be my guess. Also because this is mainly for video editing (or scratch disk) and file system doesn’t move the needle enough to matter. That being said, I don’t know why you couldn’t reformat the disk to what ever system you want. You could use it as a OS drive for an iMac that had a slower fusion drive.
 
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Bryan Bowler

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Sep 27, 2008
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Outstanding! I know most people do not have a need for the speed this little beast provides, but I certainly do. This will be the perfect device for me. I travel extensively and this will be perfect for the productions I work on in which I need to collect and edit multi-cam full-frame (35mm) 4K 60 fps files. And the best part? When I walk back into my studio, I can simply plug it right into the iMac Pro (that I will be getting in two months) and pick up right where I left off when I was on the road. No transferring files...just one super fast portable drive that can be plugged into the machine of choice.

Bravo OWC!
 
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Rockadile

macrumors 6502
Jun 11, 2012
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Outstanding! I know most people do not have a need for the speed this little beast provides, but I certainly do. This will be the perfect device for me. I travel extensively and this will be perfect for the productions I work on in which I need to collect and edit multi-cam full-frame (35mm) 4K 60 fps files. And the best part? When I walk back into my studio, I can simply plug it right into the iMac Pro (that I will be getting in two months) and pick up right where I left off when I was on the road. No transferring files...just one super fast portable drive that can be plugged into the machine of choice.

Bravo OWC!
It needs its own power outlet, just fyi in case you missed that. Doable travel capabilities but limiting.
 
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