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Ridley Scott, director of the original "1984" Apple Macintosh advertisement, has commented on Epic Games' recent parody of his ad, in an interview to IGN.

Ridley-Scott-1.jpg


When Epic Games launched its campaign against Apple over alleged anticompetitive App Store policies, it premiered a shot-for-shot remake of Apple's famous "1984" Super Bowl commercial directed by Ridley Scott, titled "Nineteen Eighty-Fortnite." The original commercial was based on the novel "Nineteen Eighty-Four" by George Orwell and was meant to convey Apple as a rebel against an oppressive regime believed to be IBM.

Whereas Apple's ad portrayed IBM as the evil "Big Brother," Epic Games aimed to show that Apple is now the oppressive authoritarian power. In a blog post, Epic Games encourages Fortnite players to fight against Apple's "app tax" by using the hashtag #FreeFortnite on social media platforms.



"Epic Games has defied the App Store Monopoly. In retaliation, Apple is blocking Fortnite from a billion devices. Join the fight to stop 2020 from becoming '1984,'" text at the end of the ad reads.

Scott confirmed to IGN that he has seen Epic's parody, and explained that while he feels that the Fortnite ad was well produced, it could have had a more powerful message.

I sure have and I wrote to them because on the one hand I can be fully complimented by the fact they copied [my commercial] shot for shot. But pity the message is so ordinary when they could have been talking about democracy or more powerful things… And they didn't use it.

I think the animation was terrific, the idea was terrific, the message was "ehh."

Fortnite has been in violation of the ‌App Store‌ rules since August 13, when it introduced a direct payment option that avoided Apple's in-app purchase system by allowing payments directly to Epic Games. Shortly after Epic blatantly disregarded ‌App Store‌ policies, Apple removed the app from the ‌App Store‌, leading to a lawsuit from Epic and a quickly escalating legal battle between the two companies. On Friday, Apple terminated Epic Games' developer account.

Article Link: Ridley Scott Comments on Epic Games' Parody of His '1984' Ad
 
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clickerclacker

macrumors member
Aug 14, 2013
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I really don't understand this. No-one is stopping Epic Games from launching their own phone, OS, and App Store. If that were the case, fair play. But it's not. What an entitled company they must be. I hope Apple never gives in to their bullying. They need to pay up like everyone else, or just sell through other platforms instead.
 

moabal

macrumors 6502a
Jun 22, 2010
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I respect this guy’s opinion like anyone else. But just because he made a good Apple ad a long time ago does not mean he has the best take on this fundamental debate on App Store policies or should be given an elevated platform.
 

G5isAlive

macrumors 65816
Aug 28, 2003
1,424
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I respect this guy’s opinion like anyone else. But just because he made a good Apple ad a long time ago does not mean he has the best take on this fundamental debate on App Store policies or should be given an elevated platform.

But folks on the forums should have the right to comment?

Seriously, Epic copied his work. What more reason does he need to he able to comment?
 

LV426

macrumors 68000
Jan 22, 2013
1,544
1,602
I really don't understand this. No-one is stopping Epic Games from launching their own phone, OS, and App Store. If that were the case, fair play. But it's not. What an entitled company they must be. I hope Apple never gives in to their bullying. They need to pay up like everyone else, or just sell through other platforms instead.

That is a complete parody of their position. Epic are in the business of selling games, not hardware or ecosystems. From their point of view, selling their work on iOS gives them a big market, but their essential argument is that it is punishingly expensive to sell it there. They are entitled to have an opinion.
 

UK-MacAddict

macrumors 6502a
May 11, 2010
688
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I do think 30% cut is a bit greedy from Apple. But at the same time nobody is forcing Epic to use the platform.

In this particular case Epic broke the contract end of story, should be nothing here to argue.

What would Epic Games do if a developer did not want to pay the 12% Epic Games Store fee and only gave them 6%?
 

UK-MacAddict

macrumors 6502a
May 11, 2010
688
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That is a complete parody of their position. Epic are in the business of selling games, not hardware or ecosystems. From their point of view, selling their work on iOS gives them a big market, but their essential argument is that it is punishingly expensive to sell it there. They are entitled to have an opinion.

They can have an opinion but not break the contract they agreed to which is 30% to Apple.

If their opinion is that it is too expensive then stop selling there.
 

ArPe

macrumors 65816
May 31, 2020
1,281
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Ridley is 100% correct.

Epic could have used the opportunity to criticize China’s treatment of the Uighur and the brainwashing detention camps that are straight out of 1984.

But since the monopoly Tencent owns Epic they can’t do that.
 

arnotron

macrumors newbie
Jun 5, 2017
7
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While I do understand that it does look a lot like a cartel if all platforms charge 30% share. But on the other hand, Apple, Google etc. provide a platform - graphics libraries, chip development, OS. There is a reason there are fewer dedicated mobile gaming devices around because most smartphones can perform better, maybe because they are upgraded more often. And one interesting historic reference: in the old days when games were purchased in boxes from brick and mortar stores, the publishers saw a lot less share than 70% of the retail Price. So I welcome anyone who challenges the status quo in a reasonable manner, but App Store rules should be the same for everyone, and the provocative action and fact-bending by Epic is just that to me - an epic failure.
 

Ubuntu

macrumors 68020
Jul 3, 2005
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I really don't understand this. No-one is stopping Epic Games from launching their own phone, OS, and App Store. If that were the case, fair play. But it's not. What an entitled company they must be. I hope Apple never gives in to their bullying. They need to pay up like everyone else, or just sell through other platforms instead.
Basically, this is a good shot at stopping Apple in it’s venture of being as anti-competitive as can be. They can crush any app they like in the App Store with no repercussion - that’s dangerous. Now, not to say that epic is the angelic hero here as they brought this on themselves, but this is the best shot we have.
 

Ubuntu

macrumors 68020
Jul 3, 2005
2,070
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UK/US
While I do understand that it does look a lot like a cartel if all platforms charge 30% share. But on the other hand, Apple, Google etc. provide a platform - graphics libraries, chip development, OS. There is a reason there are fewer dedicated mobile gaming devices around because most smartphones can perform better, maybe because they are upgraded more often. And one interesting historic reference: in the old days when games were purchased in boxes from brick and mortar stores, the publishers saw a lot less share than 70% of the retail Price. So I welcome anyone who challenges the status quo in a reasonable manner, but App Store rules should be the same for everyone, and the provocative action and fact-bending by Epic is just that to me - an epic failure.

The platform you described is just as beneficial for Apple and Google and at least for Apple their hardware sales likely cover the costs of such development. Developers need the platforms but platforms also need the developers so I don’t think that justifies the 30%. I don’t think the 30% is that unreasonable, but Apple at least is in a position where they’re motivated to do better - StoreKit (the framework for in app purchases) is simply atrocious.

Agree 100% about the guidelines but sadly it’s not the case, even if Cook claims it is, and we have proof that Epic tried to resolve this civilly before going for this stunt but Apple is in such a powerful place so they have no reason to budge.
 
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jayducharme

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Jun 22, 2006
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I do think 30% cut is a bit greedy from Apple.
I don't understand that argument. Perhaps it would help to know how much Epic would have to spend if they distributed their games through Game Stop or Target or Walmart. They'd need to provide physical copies with packaging. They'd need to ship the packages to the stores. They'd need to monitor the sales. Apple handles all of that for them virtually in the App Store, and Epic has so far done quite well that way. Epic's argument looks to me like greed. They want the benefits of the App Store but want to keep all the revenue for themselves.

As far as their "monopoly" argument, there are (as others have said) plenty of other outlets for their games. If they want access to iOS users, then Apple is within its rights to charge for that access.
 

Krizoitz

macrumors 68000
Apr 26, 2003
1,662
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Tokyo, Japan
That is a complete parody of their position. Epic are in the business of selling games, not hardware or ecosystems. From their point of view, selling their work on iOS gives them a big market, but their essential argument is that it is punishingly expensive to sell it there. They are entitled to have an opinion.

Opinion? Sure. And I’m entitled to have the opinion that speed limits are too low. But if I violate those speed limits I face consequences.

Meanwhile, Epic isn’t just in the business of selling game’s, they also license Unreal engine, and oh yeah, operate their own store which ALSO charges fees to anyone who wants to use it. Huh. How about that.
hypocrisy, thy name is Epic.
 
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