Become a MacRumors Supporter for $25/year with no ads, private forums, and more!

anthony13

macrumors 6502a
Jul 1, 2012
856
818
You don't actually own the movie unless you download it to your hard drive and keep it there. Everything that it kept in the cloud is subject to removal. So in a nutshell, you're only renting the right to watch the movie while it is still available on the cloud.

If you don't want this to happen again, I'd download every movie to a very large hard drive (you'll need it).

Apple must maintain the license to rent/sell the movie in order for it to remain in the cloud. They can and will drop movies to make room for new titles and when the distributor no longer wants them to distribute the movie. Please note that is true for any movie that you purchase from any site in the world that you don't physically download a copy of... not just Apple.

You want an actual movie archive, you need to store the content yourself at your expense, not rely on a third party.
I didn't know this, thanks for the tip. Although now I have to find a large enough hard drive to buy. I have about 100 movies. I have had obscure tv show's I've bought disappear before. The thing I always assumed was that even if I had downloaded it, there would be some sort of licensing check when I went to watch it, and it wouldn't play, but I guess not.
 

Malus120

macrumors 6502a
Jun 28, 2002
507
910
I don't want physical DVD's or Blu-Rays taking up space in my house. I know many love it, but I just don't. So I want it digitally. Sadly in Denmark, it's illegal to rip your own purchased movies, as you need to bypass encryption, which is a no-go. If it weren't, I would purchase physical, rip them, and then store the physical media in boxes.

So the only choice I have, is to purchase digitally.

So... I hate to be that guy but... Why do you care whether or not its "legal" to RIP DVDs/Blu-Rays???
You're paying for the media (not steeling) and such laws are 100% unenforceable. You won't go to jail for ripping your movie collection as there's no way for anyone to know unless you're sharing online.

Your situation with 500+ titles bought on iTunes is unfortunate and I really feel for you. Content you paid for disappearing is IMHO completely unacceptable and yet a very real concern in the digital era.

I think the lesson here is that if you're going to invest that much money in films, you owe it to yourself to invest in a blu-ray drive, a NAS/HDDs, MakeMKV and Plex. You'll get better quality, and you'll be in 100% control of your own media. As for the clutter, just sell/give away/throw away the discs once you've copied them.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: turbineseaplane

headlessmike

macrumors 6502
May 16, 2017
350
781
Are you sure? You can't trust search engines like justwatch or cheap charts, they haven't updated yet. It still shows up as available in Denmark. But when looking directly in the Danish iTunes store, it's not available.
As sure as I can be without actually purchasing it.
 

Attachments

  • 537C543A-1288-4272-AC18-3A5186E52399.jpeg
    537C543A-1288-4272-AC18-3A5186E52399.jpeg
    440.1 KB · Views: 36

currocj

macrumors 6502
Jul 8, 2008
390
518
Earth
This has NOTHING to do with Apple and EVERYTHING to do with how media is licensed.

It doesn’t matter where you source your digital content from - unless you have a copy sitting locally, it’s always at risk of vanishing.

It’s why I personally have rarely ever purchased anything digital and still rely on physical items or de-DRM’d digital copies.
Did someone say Plex? :)
 

currocj

macrumors 6502
Jul 8, 2008
390
518
Earth
It only would be illegal if you removed the copy protection from the movie after you downloaded it, so you could also watch it on non-Apple devices.
Here's what I do:

I purchase physical copies which I rip on my media server and play on Plex up to and including UHD Blu Rays. The studios can delete the cloud copies for their pound of flash all they want.
 
  • Like
Reactions: turbineseaplane

Crow_Servo

macrumors 6502a
Feb 17, 2018
621
613
America
Stuff like this has happened in the past on iTunes. A particular title disappears from people’s collections, only to suddenly return one day. And without fail, customer service always has no idea what to say when asked about it. They typically blame the user for not downloading the movie, but that’s an absurd stance.

The Apple TV device only streams, so if Apple really thought we should all be downloading our movies, there’d be a way to download movies to the Apple TV, which supposedly was possible in the past, but hasn’t been for quite a while.

Hoping your movie will return to your collection.
 

TimmuJapan

macrumors regular
Jul 7, 2020
200
318
So... I hate to be that guy but... Why do you care whether or not its "legal" to RIP DVDs/Blu-Rays???
You're paying for the media (not steeling) and such laws are 100% unenforceable. You won't go to jail for ripping your movie collection as there's no way for anyone to know unless you're sharing online.

This part above is great advice. I agree. We're both that guy. LOL.... The "not going to jail part" is also true, but there is a first time for everything, and you may not be old enough to remember Napster lawsuits AND Napster going after some of its users something like 25 years ago.....

I think the lesson here is that if you're going to invest that much money in films, you owe it to yourself to invest in a blu-ray drive, a NAS/HDDs, MakeMKV and Plex. You'll get better quality, and you'll be in 100% control of your own media. As for the clutter, just sell/give away/throw away the discs once you've copied them.

This part, I disagree with. The original poster has already stated that they don't want to deal with a mass of DVDs or Blu-rays in their house, which is totally reasonable. The best option (and totally legal option) then to preserve the Apple movies that have already been bought is just to simply download them onto an external drive--easy, peasy, Japanesey (I've been living in Japan for 15 years, so I can say this. We say this here, and it is not offensive).

Downloading to an external drive will give someone access to physical copies of all of their movies, forever, and an external drive is not going to take up a lot of space. Downloaded movies from the iTunes / tv app are great quality when played on devices that have iTunes/tv app, etc. If someone then wanted to take the extra step and be "that guy," it would be possible to remove the copy protection from most of the Apple movies, except for the most recent ones... Then, the movies could be conceivably watched on devices not associated with an Apple ID or on unsupported displays. And you are absolutely right, that in the privacy of one's home, doing this is not a big deal or unethical, as long as one isn't sharing the movies with people or selling pirated copies. But, it's good to point out that removing copy protection is technically illegal.... too much discussion of this topic will probably get posts deleted here by moderators.
 
Last edited:

Malus120

macrumors 6502a
Jun 28, 2002
507
910
This part above is great advice. I agree. We're both that guy. LOL.... The "not going to jail part" is also true, but there is a first time for everything, and you may not be old enough to remember Napster lawsuits AND Napster going after some of its users something like 25 years ago.....
(Unfortunately) old enough to remember Napster, Metallica's rage, the lawsuits, all of it LOL.
But no, I don't believe "there is a first time for everything," in the case of being arrested for ripping DVDs/Blu-rays in the privacy of your own home on a device you own.
People using Napster were sued because they were broadcasting their public IP address with every song they shared which meant anyone could easily track them down and incriminate them in thousands of individual incidents of distribution side piracy.
I don't believe downloading ripping software is illegal in any (first world) country, even if using it on a commercial discs is technically illegal. Even if it was, proving you downloaded it would be fairly difficult given modern security protections built into the web. And proving you used it to rip movies is neigh impossible unless they have a warrant to search your house and compel you to decrypt your computer.
To be clear if OP doesn't want to/isn't comfortable doing it that's fine, but in that case dealing with the hassles of buying digitally is the price they pay for that convenience, and they should advocate for legal changes that would make BS like taking away content you've already paid for illegal.

This part, I disagree with. The original poster has already stated that they don't want to deal with a mass of DVDs or Blu-rays in their house, which is totally reasonable. The best option (and totally legal option) then to preserve the Apple movies that have already been bought is just to simply download them onto an external drive--easy, peasy, Japanesey (I've been living in Japan for 15 years, so I can say this. We say this here, and it is not offensive).
Ok... so funnily enough I've lived in Japan for a similar amount of time and I don't think I've ever heard anyone say that (nor would I assume its offensive, just weird.) That said given how "analog" Japan still is in terms of media sales (and how non tech savvy a lot of consumers are) I certainly wouldn't say keeping local backups of a collection of a 500+ iTunes movie collection is very "Japanesey." (if anything renting media and copying it is more "Japanese" but I digress)
But anyway like I said, if OP doesn't want to deal with a mass of discs they can just sell them/give them away, chuck them once they've copied them.

Downloading to an external drive will give someone access to physical copies of all of their movies, forever, and an external drive is not going to take up a lot of space. Downloaded movies from the iTunes / tv app are great quality when played on devices that have iTunes/tv app, etc. If someone then wanted to take the extra step and be "that guy," it would be possible to remove the copy protection from most of the Apple movies, except for the most recent ones... Then, the movies could be conceivably watched on devices not associated with an Apple ID or on unsupported displays. And you are absolutely right, that in the privacy of one's home, doing this is not a big deal or unethical, as long as one isn't sharing the movies with people or selling pirated copies. But, it's good to point out that removing copy protection is technically illegal.... too much discussion of this topic will probably get posts deleted here by moderators.
Sure OP can (and should) backup their iTunes files locally going forward and or remove DRM if they so choose (although if their so concerned that they'd never copy a disc...) but I think there's a fair argument to be made that they shouldn't have to do that and if they're going to go through that much trouble they might as well just start ripping discs. I just wanted to provide another perspective.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: TimmuJapan

TimmuJapan

macrumors regular
Jul 7, 2020
200
318
Ok... so funnily enough I've lived in Japan for a similar amount of time and I don't think I've ever heard anyone say that (nor would I assume its offensive, just weird.)
LOL, we need a different thread, but little kids in Japan say this all the time now a days. "Easy peasey Japanesey", "Easy peasy lemon squeezey"...

It means nothing except for "that's the easy way." ?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Malus120

lm57400

macrumors member
Aug 17, 2009
36
18
I’ve never had a movie disappear from my collection, TV shows on the other hand… at least they gave me a credit when it was pulled.

From my understanding, if the movie disappears (from the country you purchased it), you would get a refund (partial) or credit into your account. All my movies are there. However, I have switched back to physical since a digital copy is included for the same price.
Ah really? This would be at least one part of a possible "solution".

At the end of the day physical media may also not rescue your collection. You can have your movies on Blu Rays or DVDs, but there will be a time when also these media and the hardware players won't be available anymore ^^

And your hard drive may also fail at some point... :p
 

snowatom

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jan 8, 2011
134
99
Denmark
However, I have switched back to physical since a digital copy is included for the same price.
Well the rest of the world don’t have that option. Digital codes is only a thing in USA, Canada and Australia.

The rest of the world has to choose either digital or physical purchase.
 
  • Wow
Reactions: progx

E.Lizardo

macrumors 68000
May 28, 2008
1,693
238
I don't want physical DVD's or Blu-Rays taking up space in my house. I know many love it, but I just don't. So I want it digitally. Sadly in Denmark, it's illegal to rip your own purchased movies, as you need to bypass encryption, which is a no-go. If it weren't, I would purchase physical, rip them, and then store the physical media in boxes.

So the only choice I have, is to purchase digitally.
Then you have two choices. Download and store your purchases on a hard drive,or risk having them disappear again. If you don't back them up and it happens again it's your own fault.
 
Last edited:

E.Lizardo

macrumors 68000
May 28, 2008
1,693
238
I'll agree that some movies probably shouldn't even be watched once... but I "really shouldn't watch" Citizen Kane, 2001, The Treasure of Sierra Madre, Vertigo and many others more than four times? There are quite a few movies I've watched dozens of times, maybe more.
Yes indeed. Hmmm...might make an interesting thread. "Which movies have you already,or expect to watch more than four times?"
 
  • Like
Reactions: Boyd01

E.Lizardo

macrumors 68000
May 28, 2008
1,693
238
Ah really? This would be at least one part of a possible "solution".

At the end of the day physical media may also not rescue your collection. You can have your movies on Blu Rays or DVDs, but there will be a time when also these media and the hardware players won't be available anymore ^^

And your hard drive may also fail at some point... :p
Not to mention the sun will go nova at some point and ALL my movies will be lost!?
 

HDFan

Contributor
Jun 30, 2007
3,816
1,378
And your hard drive may also fail at some point...

That's why you back it up with a 3-2-1 backup strategy.

It has been years since I have heard of the studios going after people ripping their personal movies here in the U.S. Maybe they are still doing it, but it isn't making the news.
 

progx

macrumors 6502
Oct 3, 2003
463
437
Pennsylvania
Ah really? This would be at least one part of a possible "solution".

At the end of the day physical media may also not rescue your collection. You can have your movies on Blu Rays or DVDs, but there will be a time when also these media and the hardware players won't be available anymore ^^

And your hard drive may also fail at some point... :p
… the same could happen if iTunes disappears and without any refunds. Apple doesn’t sell straight MP4 copies of movies, they would have to be converted.

Blu Ray has been around since 2006. DVD since the 1990s. All those formats are still in play, plus I have many consoles and players that work just fine, too. I’m pretty safe, can’t speak for everyone who doesn’t take care of their equipment.
 

snowatom

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jan 8, 2011
134
99
Denmark
The item came back in the Danish store today, but it did not show up in my collection. I could play it from the store though. So I tired logging out of App Store/iCloud and back in again. That did it. So I'm again the proud owner of a collection with no movies lost from digital purchase. 👍
 

Boyd01

Moderator
Staff member
Feb 21, 2012
6,342
3,187
New Jersey Pine Barrens
Then you have two choices. Download and store your purchases on a hard drive,or risk having them disappear again. If you don't back them up and it happens again it's your own fault.

This is what I have always done and assumed that would cover me. However, last night I found that my downloaded iTunes movies will no longer play in the Computers app on my AppleTV, presumably due to an auto-update to the newest TVOS (didn't do any troubleshooting yet).

I can still stream these movies in the Apple TV app, but cannot play the downloaded version, I get an error to the effect "this movie cannot be played on this device". Really hope this is some kind of bug and not a deliberate attempt to prevent us from watching our downloads on the Apple TV. The movies that I ripped from DVD's myself still work, it's only the Apple purchases that won't play.

See this thread:

 

PlayUltimate

macrumors 6502a
Jul 29, 2016
730
1,107
Boulder, CO
Happens with music from Apple Music as well.

It's insidious and rarely talked about.
Seen it a lot in Apple Music. I've purchased many albums that are no longer for sale. But I download everything onto an external. Sometimes I create an additional copy on a different external. And everything is backed up onto a third TimeMachine Drive.
 
  • Like
Reactions: IllinoisCorn

Boyd01

Moderator
Staff member
Feb 21, 2012
6,342
3,187
New Jersey Pine Barrens
Music is a different, since it is DRM-free and can be played on any device or app. But movies must be watched on Apple devices with Apple software. So it doesn't matter how many backups you have if their software will no longer play your downloaded video...
 

snowatom

macrumors regular
Original poster
Jan 8, 2011
134
99
Denmark
A movie backup from iTunes is only worth doing, if you also remove DRM. Otherwise you are wasting space, as you still are bound to a copyright license.

Sadly removing DRM is illegal.
 

phrehdd

macrumors 68040
Oct 25, 2008
3,770
983
This has NOTHING to do with Apple and EVERYTHING to do with how media is licensed.

It doesn’t matter where you source your digital content from - unless you have a copy sitting locally, it’s always at risk of vanishing.

It’s why I personally have rarely ever purchased anything digital and still rely on physical items or de-DRM’d digital copies.
A simple choice for some - buy the disc and ideally it should allow for a code to get a digital copy via MoviesAnywhere or something similar. The drawbacks are two - cost (often discs cost more) and if you buy a 4k UHD movie, the digital copy might not be 4k UHD but 1080p (blueray). For me, I rather have the disc, get the digital copy from it and be done. There are times however, streaming services have major discounts and I might grab a couple of movies knowing they may disappear from their catalogue down the line.
 
Register on MacRumors! This sidebar will go away, and you'll see fewer ads.