Samsung Galaxy Fold

jamezr

macrumors G5
Aug 7, 2011
13,027
10,990
US
I don't know that most do or do not prefer touchscreen. I haven't made any such claims, now have I? Your anecdotal experience on forums is meaningless. So....you have nothing.

I know that, to me, I would rather have devices that do their job individually and do it well. Thus, my Lenovo Yoga C940 isn't used as a tablet. My iPad is. But that is just me.
you don't know that most prefer or do not prefer touchscreen now do you.....so you offer more hyperbole....
then you offer your opinion or use case as fact...it is not fact just your opinion so you have nothing....
 

TopherMan12

macrumors 6502a
Oct 10, 2019
501
458
Atlanta, GA
you don't know that most prefer or do not prefer touchscreen now do you.....so you offer more hyperbole....
then you offer your opinion or use case as fact...it is not fact just your opinion so you have nothing....
What part of the following sentence do you not understand?

"I don't know that most do or do not prefer touchscreen. "
 

jamezr

macrumors G5
Aug 7, 2011
13,027
10,990
US
What part of the following sentence do you not understand?

"I don't know that most do or do not prefer touchscreen. "
like I said...you got nothing...you just seems to want to argue with everyone...
I have given reason why Apple doesn't want to release a touchscreen display. You offer noting...i get it you're just argumentative.
 

TopherMan12

macrumors 6502a
Oct 10, 2019
501
458
Atlanta, GA
like I said...you got nothing...you just seems to want to argue with everyone...
I have given reason why Apple doesn't want to release a touchscreen display. You offer noting...i get it you're just argumentative.
I'm argumentative and yet you are arguing with me about whether I know something that I blatantly just said "I don't know"?

If you weren't argumentative, you wouldn't still be posting. Neither would I. I guess we are both argumentative, now aren't we?
 

jamezr

macrumors G5
Aug 7, 2011
13,027
10,990
US
I'm argumentative and yet you are arguing with me about whether I know something that I blatantly just said "I don't know"?

If you weren't argumentative, you wouldn't still be posting. Neither would I. I guess we are both argumentative, now aren't we?
nope...I along with others have responded to your position that companies cannot be courageous...we have shown examples and counter points that disprove your position. You offer nothing in return but more arguments and hyperbole.
 

TopherMan12

macrumors 6502a
Oct 10, 2019
501
458
Atlanta, GA
nope...I along with others have responded to your position that companies cannot be courageous...we have shown examples and counter points that disprove your position. You offer nothing in return but more arguments and hyperbole.
Be sure and look up the word "hyperbole" before you go to bed. You are using it wrong.
 

Johns12

macrumors regular
Dec 10, 2008
191
92
One thing I'll say. For anyone who says they don't want a product to bea jack of all trades, but instead wants a device that does it's job individually, you're not looking at what's right in front of you.

All smartphones today are a combination of different products in one package. Used to be in the old days, you had an mp3 player, phone, some form of computer, and a watch to quickly tell time. Smartphones basically killed mp3 players. I stopped wearing a watch many years ago and used my phone to tell me the time. You used to need an alarm clock, now you use your phone.

All we have done over the years is exactly the opposite of what people claim with wanting a product that does it's job individually. We cram more and more into one product. If an individual doesn't see the point in a touchscreen laptop, I believe they are shortsighted. If you can't see the possibilities of a product like the Fold, I believe you are shortsighted. In saying shortsighted, I'm not trying to insult anyone. Hell, I thought that smartwatches would be a failure. People were moving away from wearing watches years ago. I was shortsighted.
 
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TopherMan12

macrumors 6502a
Oct 10, 2019
501
458
Atlanta, GA
One thing I'll say. For anyone who says they don't want a product to bea jack of all trades, but instead wants a device that does it's job individually, you're not looking at what's right in front of you.

All smartphones today are a combination of different products in one package. Used to be in the old days, you had an mp3 player, phone, some form of computer, and a watch to quickly tell time. Smartphones basically killed mp3 players. I stopped wearing a watch many years ago and used my phone to tell me the time. You used to need an alarm clock, now you use your phone.
Not sure who is saying that. If one device can perform functionally as well as two devices then I am all for that. But whether or not it does function as well is going is a matter of opinion. For example, I still use an alarm clock. It does its job and stays in one place. I don't have to worry about whether or not I remembered to sit it next to my bed because it never moves.

All we have done over the years is exactly the opposite of what people claim with wanting a product that does it's job individually. We cram more and more into one product. If an individual doesn't see the point in a touchscreen laptop, I believe they are shortsighted. If you can't see the possibilities of a product like the Fold, I believe you are shortsighted. In saying shortsighted, I'm not trying to insult anyone. Hell, I thought that smartwatches would be a failure. People were moving away from wearing watches years ago. I was shortsighted.
Again, not sure whose points you are referring to. Who said there is no point to touchscreen laptops? Obviously there is a point to many. Personally, I do not care for them. I own a Lenovo Yoga C940 which is a 2-in-1 but I use the device exclusively as a laptop. IMO, it is horrible as a tablet so I use an iPad. But for others, a 2-in-1 works just fine, I guess. Same for touchscreen laptops. Nothing wrong with that. Frankly, I wish my laptop worked as well in tablet mode as an iPad. One less thing. Maybe one day they will create a 2-in-1 to my liking.
 

Johns12

macrumors regular
Dec 10, 2008
191
92
I don't know that most do or do not prefer touchscreen. I haven't made any such claims, now have I? Your anecdotal experience on forums is meaningless. So....you have nothing.

I know that, to me, I would rather have devices that do their job individually and do it well. Thus, my Lenovo Yoga C940 isn't used as a tablet. My iPad is. But that is just me.
My apologies. This was was what I was referencing. But, not just this comment, If we're all truthful, You'll find many people in this and other threads saying things such as folding phones are not needed, a solution searching for a problem, no reason for a touchscreen Mac. We all know these things have been said. I'm just pointing out that much of what we do now, is with tech we didn't know would exist then.
 
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SteveJUAE

macrumors 68030
Aug 14, 2015
2,973
2,827
Land of Smiles
The galaxy fold is to me the embodiment of everything that is wrong with Samsung.

Even with decades of experience building products and integrating hardware, software, and services, you can still decide to make a smartphone with a hardware keyboard, netbook, circular smartwatch, or a foldable phone. The reason why Apple has not made any of these, and instead created iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, AirPods, and is now working of Glasses, is design.

Design is the magic ingredience, with Apple designers calling the shots, and searching for and having technology made to serve the product experience, not engineers excited about about new hot tech and trying to turn it into a product. Which is likely what happened here. Samsung had this cool folding screen technology that they probably felt that they had to turn into a useable product, else all that R&D would go down the drain. They rushed it out the door, to predictable results.

Apple Glasses vs. foldable phones is the latest example of Apple's design culture leading to an entirely different product than what engineering-led companies are doing.

There’s also the issue of how nobody at Samsung realised that the galaxy fold would be so easily damaged by dirt, something the reviewers took less than a day to discover. Either their product testing process was so fundamentally flawed, or nobody dared to report this to their superiors, or someone at the top decided to release it nevertheless. Either way, it doesn’t paint a flattering image of Samsung.

There’s nothing courageous about Samsung releasing said product. If anything, they are testament to the dysfunctional corporate culture in Samsung, and that is not something to be celebrated, IMO.
Honestly Abazigal, I know you like your Apple products and esp your Ipad but really, did you get up extra early to concoct this

Even under generalizations and a bit of fun banter this is not worthy of your normal rational points
- - Post merged: - -

The MacBook keyboard has a flaw which affects a small proportion of laptops in existence, and which is covered with AppleCare. Are you really equating this with a smartphone whose screen completely blacks out the moment someone nicks it with a fingernail?

My theory on why Samsung continues to stick with circular smartwatches is that the company invested too much in its rotating bezel to move beyond it and truly embrace a non-circular design. Moving past the rotating bezel would require Samsung to redo large portions of its smartwatch strategy and come up with something resembling Apple Watch's Digital Crown.

As for phablets, sure, it gave Samsung an early lead, but in some regards, Samsung peaked right before Apple unveiled larger iPhones. The company has not been able to find its footing since.

As for the galaxy fold, it’s a fundamentally-flawed product however I see it. This isn’t a smartphone that happens to unfold into a larger device. Instead, the Galaxy Fold is a small tablet that folds in half so that it can fit into your pocket. I fail to see how this constitutes a good user experience. It’s not clear why someone would want to carry a small tablet that folds into a suboptimal smartphone instead of just carrying a much better smartphone.

To me, foldable displays for smartphones seem to fit more in the bucket of edge screens and smartphone pens (design trends that have not caught on) versus large screens (a design trend that has become the default option).

It’s a gimmick through and through.
Your obviously under the weather
 

TopherMan12

macrumors 6502a
Oct 10, 2019
501
458
Atlanta, GA
My apologies. This was was what I was referencing. But, not just this comment, If we're all truthful, You'll find many people in this and other threads saying things such as folding phones are not needed, a solution searching for a problem, no reason for a touchscreen Mac. We all know these things have been said. I'm just pointing out that much of what we do now, is with tech we didn't know would exist then.
Ok, so how is my comment about the lack of evidence as to whether people want/don't want touch screen MacBooks relevant to your post again? That is not the same thing as saying there is "no reason for a touchscreen Mac" at all. As far as how I personally don't use my 2-in-1 as a tablet, I said "but that is just me" and shouldn't be generalized into anything else. Just because my iPhone replaced my iPod doesn't mean my 2-in-1 automatically replaced my tablet.

If your point is that we shouldn't prejudge new technology then I agree and I haven't said otherwise. My attitude towards folding phones has been generally positive in that I am excited to see how this segment evolves. No point trying to speak to what other "people" have said.
 
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Awesomesince86

macrumors 6502a
Sep 18, 2016
818
1,168
The galaxy fold is to me the embodiment of everything that is wrong with Samsung.

Even with decades of experience building products and integrating hardware, software, and services, you can still decide to make a smartphone with a hardware keyboard, netbook, circular smartwatch, or a foldable phone. The reason why Apple has not made any of these, and instead created iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch, AirPods, and is now working of Glasses, is design.

Design is the magic ingredience, with Apple designers calling the shots, and searching for and having technology made to serve the product experience, not engineers excited about about new hot tech and trying to turn it into a product. Which is likely what happened here. Samsung had this cool folding screen technology that they probably felt that they had to turn into a useable product, else all that R&D would go down the drain. They rushed it out the door, to predictable results.

Apple Glasses vs. foldable phones is the latest example of Apple's design culture leading to an entirely different product than what engineering-led companies are doing.

There’s also the issue of how nobody at Samsung realised that the galaxy fold would be so easily damaged by dirt, something the reviewers took less than a day to discover. Either their product testing process was so fundamentally flawed, or nobody dared to report this to their superiors, or someone at the top decided to release it nevertheless. Either way, it doesn’t paint a flattering image of Samsung.

There’s nothing courageous about Samsung releasing said product. If anything, they are testament to the dysfunctional corporate culture in Samsung, and that is not something to be celebrated, IMO.
I know I'm a little late to the party here, but I wanted to address some of this nonsense.

First, I find it weird that you bash Samsung for making circular watches as if that idea is asinine. I think a majority of people think the Apple watch design in not at all attractive but are willing to make the trade-off for the functionality of it. There's nothing wrong with Samsung's smartwatches other than a lack of effort in refining the software side. Aesthetically I think they look far better than the Apple watches.

You can disagree with folding phones all you want. I myself don't really see a need for them. But that doesn't mean there's no market for them. Once foldable glass reaches a maturing point, manufacturers will have worked out some of the kinks with hinge based devices and they could really take off (if price comes down). If that does happen, do you really think Apple will ignore that market? Of course not, they will develop something similar, come up with the fancy i-name so the Apple crowd thinks its revolutionary, and you will probably praise them for the great design prowess. I agree that Samsung rushed it out the door but that doesn't mean they should play it safe. Some companies are more willing to take risks than others a consumers willing to spend $2000 on tech should be responsible enough to do their research and know what they're getting into with a first of its kind device.

And are you really praising Apple Glasses? A product we know nothing about, oh other than it is currently 3 years its original internal release date. Thats not a great sign. It could be a monumental failure but you're just assuming it will be great. What if Apple fails with glasses so badly that they don't even release it ala Apple Power (or whatever their charging pad was supposed to be called)?

You're obviously a Apple supporter and thats fine. I have a Pro Max and a iPad Pro and I love them both, but I appreciate the different ways these companies produce tech. I also think you're being a little forgetful with regards to Apples perfect design choices. Did nobody in their R&D team notice that holding the iPhone 4s a normal way would cause the antenna signal to be blocked and cut off reception? Did nobody notice the iPhone 6 was so fragile that sitting with it in your pocket could cause the frame to bend? Did nobody in software notice that the version of Facetime pushed to customers would let users eavesdrop on another device without them answering? Or that Apple Maps when released was an embarrassing beta-level app?

Apple are not without their faults and mishaps as well. So maybe take Apple off their high horse.
 
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Abazigal

macrumors G5
Jul 18, 2011
12,224
10,091
Singapore
I know I'm a little late to the party here, but I wanted to address some of this nonsense.

First, I find it weird that you bash Samsung for making circular watches as if that idea is asinine. I think a majority of people think the Apple watch design in not at all attractive but are willing to make the trade-off for the functionality of it. There's nothing wrong with Samsung's smartwatches other than a lack of effort in refining the software side. Aesthetically I think they look far better than the Apple watches.

You can disagree with folding phones all you want. I myself don't really see a need for them. But that doesn't mean there's no market for them. Once foldable glass reaches a maturing point, manufacturers will have worked out some of the kinks with hinge based devices and they could really take off (if price comes down). If that does happen, do you really think Apple will ignore that market? Of course not, they will develop something similar, come up with the fancy i-name so the Apple crowd thinks its revolutionary, and you will probably praise them for the great design prowess. I agree that Samsung rushed it out the door but that doesn't mean they should play it safe. Some companies are more willing to take risks than others a consumers willing to spend $2000 on tech should be responsible enough to do their research and know what they're getting into with a first of its kind device.

And are you really praising Apple Glasses? A product we know nothing about, oh other than it is currently 3 years its original internal release date. Thats not a great sign. It could be a monumental failure but you're just assuming it will be great. What if Apple fails with glasses so badly that they don't even release it ala Apple Power (or whatever their charging pad was supposed to be called)?

You're obviously a Apple supporter and thats fine. I have a Pro Max and a iPad Pro and I love them both, but I appreciate the different ways these companies produce tech. I also think you're being a little forgetful with regards to Apples perfect design choices. Did nobody in their R&D team notice that holding the iPhone 4s a normal way would cause the antenna signal to be blocked and cut off reception? Did nobody notice the iPhone 6 was so fragile that sitting with it in your pocket could cause the frame to bend? Did nobody in software notice that the version of Facetime pushed to customers would let users eavesdrop on another device without them answering? Or that Apple Maps when released was an embarrassing beta-level app?

Apple are not without their faults and mishaps as well. So maybe take Apple off their high horse.
I concur that Apple (or their products) is neither perfect nor infallible. But what annoys me is the clear double standards between Apple and Samsung (and pretty much every other company out there). These companies are claimed to be outperforming Apple, yet aren’t judged by the same high standards that Apple is subject to, while Apple is constantly facing an outsized amount of skepticism and cynicism, just because.

To me, a square Apple Watch makes sense when you consider that it’s key purpose is to consume information. Likewise, I suspect that Samsung went with a round smartwatch because of that rotating bezel, which I agree is in itself a very clever feature, but the problem is that it locked Samsung into using a round form factor for their watches, and I believe it will end up being the wrong bet moving forward.

As for the folding phone, again, let’s revisit Apple’s design-led philosophy. You first start with the end in the mind, then work backwards to see how you can best deliver that experience using the current technology available. What experience is the galaxy fold suppose to deliver again? I don’t see consumers wanting to keep unfolding the device when using apps. The problem is that Samsung followed an engineering mindset. They had this amazing folding screen tech, and evidently felt pressured into doing something useful with it so they could convince other companies to purchase their display tech. I have no idea why they were rushing to get it out the door even.

Just so we are clear, I do absolutely believe that there is a market for the folding display tech. I just don’t think that market lies in folding phones. Rather, I believe that it will be more useful in wearable displays (eg: Apple Watch and Apple glasses).

And yes, I realise that I am kinda jumping the gun here by declaring the Apple glasses a success even before Apple has even confirmed that they are working on such a product. It could very well end up going the way of AirPower, but looking at every other company involved in smart glasses has opted to target the enterprise market, I dare say that if there is anyone to successfully bring a pair of smart glasses to the consumer market, it’s Apple.

They have the brand cachet, a dominant position in mobile, control over their own ecosystem, and the pieces are all falling into place (W1 chip, focus on battery efficiency and miniaturisation).

At Apple product events, the takeaways often end up being related more to how Apple is setting the stage for the future. Certain announcements and features make much more sense when thinking about what Apple will likely unveil the following year. We see very clearly how Apple is using mobile to push wearables.

With Samsung products, it's the opposite. There doesn’t seem to be any coherent vision when it comes to the future. It’s like they have seen the writing on the wall when it comes to wearables, which would explain why their wearables strategy doesn’t seem to be going anywhere.
 

Awesomesince86

macrumors 6502a
Sep 18, 2016
818
1,168
I concur that Apple (or their products) is neither perfect nor infallible. But what annoys me is the clear double standards between Apple and Samsung (and pretty much every other company out there). These companies are claimed to be outperforming Apple, yet aren’t judged by the same high standards that Apple is subject to, while Apple is constantly facing an outsized amount of skepticism and cynicism, just because.

To me, a square Apple Watch makes sense when you consider that it’s key purpose is to consume information. Likewise, I suspect that Samsung went with a round smartwatch because of that rotating bezel, which I agree is in itself a very clever feature, but the problem is that it locked Samsung into using a round form factor for their watches, and I believe it will end up being the wrong bet moving forward.

As for the folding phone, again, let’s revisit Apple’s design-led philosophy. You first start with the end in the mind, then work backwards to see how you can best deliver that experience using the current technology available. What experience is the galaxy fold suppose to deliver again? I don’t see consumers wanting to keep unfolding the device when using apps. The problem is that Samsung followed an engineering mindset. They had this amazing folding screen tech, and evidently felt pressured into doing something useful with it so they could convince other companies to purchase their display tech. I have no idea why they were rushing to get it out the door even.

Just so we are clear, I do absolutely believe that there is a market for the folding display tech. I just don’t think that market lies in folding phones. Rather, I believe that it will be more useful in wearable displays (eg: Apple Watch and Apple glasses).

And yes, I realise that I am kinda jumping the gun here by declaring the Apple glasses a success even before Apple has even confirmed that they are working on such a product. It could very well end up going the way of AirPower, but looking at every other company involved in smart glasses has opted to target the enterprise market, I dare say that if there is anyone to successfully bring a pair of smart glasses to the consumer market, it’s Apple.

They have the brand cachet, a dominant position in mobile, control over their own ecosystem, and the pieces are all falling into place (W1 chip, focus on battery efficiency and miniaturisation).

At Apple product events, the takeaways often end up being related more to how Apple is setting the stage for the future. Certain announcements and features make much more sense when thinking about what Apple will likely unveil the following year. We see very clearly how Apple is using mobile to push wearables.

With Samsung products, it's the opposite. There doesn’t seem to be any coherent vision when it comes to the future. It’s like they have seen the writing on the wall when it comes to wearables, which would explain why their wearables strategy doesn’t seem to be going anywhere.
I think the purpose of a foldable device is very clear to me...to make the largest screen possible a pocketable device. In the age of 7-in smartphones, we've reached a ceiling on how much screen a traditional device can have. With phones that unfold into a tablet, we have the ability to stretch that size considerably. In an age where media consumption outweighs traditional phone functions, you can see why that would be desirable.

I think its far more likely that foldable devices becomes a mainstream thing when compared to glasses tech. While I dont think Google did a good job with their glasses tech, I think their foray into the market shows that people either arent ready or dont want wearable tech on their face. A lot of that is the aesthetics just werent there, but also that people dont like having a camera pointed at them at all times. Apple glasses will almost certainly contain a camera. In a word where privacy is already a concern, I don't see people being ok with them.

When it comes to the double standards for Apple, I'm not sure what you're referring to. Can you provide some examples? I feel like other tech companies are highly scrutinized for their bad decisions as well. Samsung took a beating with the Note 7 battery debacle. Google continues to take beatings for their decisions with the Pixel line and recently with Stadia. Id say they take more heat for their decisions than almost any company. Honestly, I think Apple got off lightly for the Facetime debacle considering it turned any Apple device into basically a hidden microphone. And I think Apple were rightly given a hard time for their decision to secretly throttle devices. But I'm open to hearing some examples or where you think they were unfairly judged or where other companies got off easy.
 

Zito Abroad

macrumors regular
Mar 17, 2019
214
589
To me, a square Apple Watch makes sense when you consider that it’s key purpose is to consume information. Likewise, I suspect that Samsung went with a round smartwatch because of that rotating bezel, which I agree is in itself a very clever feature, but the problem is that it locked Samsung into using a round form factor for their watches, and I believe it will end up being the wrong bet moving forward.
Samsung's been doing smartwatches for some time now. They started with a square and rectangular watch. So going to the circular design isn't without experience. The rotating bezel doesn't lock them into a circle design, as the current watch uses the touchscreen as the bezel. That means they can easily achieve the same effect with a square design. Using the edge to scroll.


With Samsung products, it's the opposite. There doesn’t seem to be any coherent vision when it comes to the future. It’s like they have seen the writing on the wall when it comes to wearables, which would explain why their wearables strategy doesn’t seem to be going anywhere.
Do you just say what's on your mind, without any data to back up what you're saying?

Read
 
Last edited:

Abazigal

macrumors G5
Jul 18, 2011
12,224
10,091
Singapore
Do you just say what's on your mind, without any data to back up what you're saying?

Read
It’s interesting that you shared that article, given how in the time that has elapsed since then, Fitbit (which is 2nd in terms of market share) has sold itself to Google. My take is that the Apple Watch ended up redefining the wearables industry to the point where Fitbit found itself increasingly unable to compete. To put it another way, Apple watches are miniature computers you wear on your wrist, while Fitbit trackers are glorified pedometers. It was basically iphone vs Blackberry 2.0.

I don’t expect Google to be able to do anything meaningful with the Fitbit acquisition either. They simply lack the design-led internal culture which I believe remains crucial to succeeding in wearables, because designers are not given control over the user experience.

Which brings us to Samsung. In the long term, I don’t expect Samsung’s wearables strategy to go anywhere either. It’s clear from their earlier keynotes that Samsung sees wearables as an accessory, with the smartphone being the centre of our lives.

Compare this to Apple, who is slowly but surely positioning the Apple Watch and AirPods as their own platforms (eventually). In this regard, Samsung just isn’t at the same level as Apple. Apple has spent decades learning how to make technology more personal, and these lessons are now being used to establish the most formidable wearables platform in existence.

I think the next few years will be even more telling. There is no smartwatch market. There is only the Apple Watch market.
 

Awesomesince86

macrumors 6502a
Sep 18, 2016
818
1,168
It’s interesting that you shared that article, given how in the time that has elapsed since then, Fitbit (which is 2nd in terms of market share) has sold itself to Google. My take is that the Apple Watch ended up redefining the wearables industry to the point where Fitbit found itself increasingly unable to compete. To put it another way, Apple watches are miniature computers you wear on your wrist, while Fitbit trackers are glorified pedometers. It was basically iphone vs Blackberry 2.0.

I don’t expect Google to be able to do anything meaningful with the Fitbit acquisition either. They simply lack the design-led internal culture which I believe remains crucial to succeeding in wearables, because designers are not given control over the user experience.

Which brings us to Samsung. In the long term, I don’t expect Samsung’s wearables strategy to go anywhere either. It’s clear from their earlier keynotes that Samsung sees wearables as an accessory, with the smartphone being the centre of our lives.

Compare this to Apple, who is slowly but surely positioning the Apple Watch and AirPods as their own platforms (eventually). In this regard, Samsung just isn’t at the same level as Apple. Apple has spent decades learning how to make technology more personal, and these lessons are now being used to establish the most formidable wearables platform in existence.

I think the next few years will be even more telling. There is no smartwatch market. There is only the Apple Watch market.
You keep making these statements that prove you put Apple products on a pedestal. The Applepods as their own platform? Cmon now. They are bang average earbuds that get hyped because they’re Apple products. Sounds quality is below average and aesthetically they are horrible. People fall for them because they connect in a cool way and they’re Apple products. That’s it. The only thing they do above average is mic quality.
 
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Klyster

macrumors 68000
Dec 7, 2013
1,775
1,911
Just ignore, none of this has anything to do with the fold, it's just some elaborate trolling thread disruption tactic.
Nothing will change if you engage people like this, they're way too deep in the rdf...
 
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Zito Abroad

macrumors regular
Mar 17, 2019
214
589
So the clamshell Galaxy Fold just got leaked. It's supposed to be around $800, so the new Razr foldable is gonna be DOA. There's simply no comparison in looks. There's no big chin on the Samsung, and the design is just so much cleaner and modern. And there's no doubt the camera will be better on this, as the Razr doesn't have flagship specs. I'm also willing to bet the Razr 's software won't have anything on Samsung's One UI. I'll still be waiting for the real successor to the Galaxy Fold. I have no interest in a clamshell.

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