Screen Resoultion on latest Macbooks?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by james6000, Jul 4, 2007.

  1. james6000 macrumors member

    james6000

    Joined:
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    UK
    #1
    I've searched around on the forums and haven't found the exact answer I'm looking for.

    I've recently ordered a mid-range Macbook (2.16GHZ, White) and for a few months I will be running it primarily at home. So I would like to use my current Acer AL1916W LCD monitor which has a screen resolution of 1440 by 900.

    I've read that MBP runs fine on this resolution, but not sure whether the MB is able to output at this resolution. Does anybody know if it would be able to?

    P.S. These forums are the BEST! They are what persuaded me to switchover from PC as well as helping me save money by purchasing refurb!

    Thanks
     
  2. amoda macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2006
    #2
    From Apple's website:


    Extended desktop and video mirroring: Simultaneously supports full native resolution on the built-in display and up to 1920 by 1200 pixels on an external display, both at millions of colors
     
  3. james6000 thread starter macrumors member

    james6000

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    #3
    Oh ok. So thats why when I had a look at my sister's macbook resolution options, it only goes up to 1280 by 800.
     
  4. amoda macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2006
    #4
    Is that sarcasm I sense?

    Anyways...that's because you obviously can't have a resolution of 1920x1200 on a 13.3" screen. To get the full resolution of an external screen you need to a) put the macbook to sleep b) connect the screen c) wake the macbook up by pressing any key d) then close the macbook screen quickly again. You can't operate an external screen at max resolution while also using the macbook's screen.

    P.S If you're afraid of overheating (which apparently isn't an issue) you can, instead of c & d, wake up the macbook using an attached mouse or keyboard while the screen is closed. The external screen will then be used and you can open the lid of the macbook while still the internal being unused.
     
  5. james6000 thread starter macrumors member

    james6000

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    #5
    Lol, no it's not sarcasm, I didn't think about it that way. I thought that it would show what resolutions are available rather than what the actual screen can take.

    Thanks for your help : )
     
  6. john2006wright macrumors regular

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    Jun 25, 2007
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    UK
    #6
    i was wondering about this as well. thanks for the information!
     
  7. Jessy macrumors regular

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    NE Ohio
    #7
    You're wrong. 1920 x 1200 on an external monitor along with 1280x800 on the MacBook itself is the maximum supported extended desktop. You CAN do what was said, but it's not necessary.

    In fact, you quoted so yourself:
    "Extended desktop and video mirroring: Simultaneously supports full native resolution on the built-in display and up to 1920 by 1200 pixels on an external display, both at millions of colors."

    There's a button under Display Preferences that you hit labeled "Detect Displays". No closing or sleeping necessary.
     
  8. james6000 thread starter macrumors member

    james6000

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    #8
    What do you mean you CAN do what was said? Whats the alternative?
     
  9. Jessy macrumors regular

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    Oct 18, 2006
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    NE Ohio
    #9
    Four options:

    1. Run MacBook screen by itself.
    2. Run MacBook screen along with external monitor - "extended desktop".
    3. Run external monitor with MacBook lid closed.
    4. Run both monitors with a mirrored image of the MacBook screen blown up to fit your external monitor's screen.

    Option 2 is the one I use at home, and at lunch at work. Great stuff. Also, Wacom just finally released drivers for the Intuos3 that allow you to switch between both screens, just one screen, or just the other.
     
  10. james6000 thread starter macrumors member

    james6000

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    #10
    I'm mostly likely to go with option 3.

    I've read around in the forums about people using stands or coolers for their laptops. Has their been past evidence that just leaving the macbook running on a desk causes damage or something, or is this all just for peace of mind?
     
  11. Jessy macrumors regular

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    #11
    Keep in mind you will lose the ability to use your amazing scrolling trackpad, possibly the greatest feature of the MacBook. Also, you're going to have to use an external keyboard. Have you ever run dual monitors before?
     
  12. james6000 thread starter macrumors member

    james6000

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    #12
    I have accidentally when I wired up my PC to an LCD monitor and my TV. Didn't know what was going on!

    What are the advantages of using dual screen? I never really thought about using that feature.

    Also, I haven't properly used one so what great about the trackpad. The only thing I know thats significant is the "2 finger scroll."
     
  13. Jessy macrumors regular

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    #13
    That's what's significant. It scrolls in two axes simultaneously. You can also right click with it without holding control, though that's less important. What I do is use the Wacom stylus in one hand and keep the other hand free for keyboard shortcuts or scrolling with the trackpad. And as for the advantage of dual monitors, let's think of it this way...do you only use half of your current screen? That's what not running a dual monitor setup is like when you have it available to you, which you do.
     
  14. jaycrew macrumors member

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    Aug 5, 2005
    Location:
    NY
    #14
    I'm running both a Blackbook and the 19inch Samsung LCD it's connected to. The Blackbook is at 1280 x 800 and the external LCD at 1440 x 900.

    The trackpads on the Intel Macs are cool. Two fingers to scroll. Right click can now be done by merely tapping the trackpad with two fingers.
     
  15. james6000 thread starter macrumors member

    james6000

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    #15
    I'm not really sure what you mean by using half a screen. I'm using all of my screen. Nevertheless, thanks for your info, I'll try the setup when (and if) i get my macbook.

    Also, on another point, isn't there only DVI for a macbook? I have a VGA connection for my screen and have being thinking about to connect the 2. Would it be better to buy a DVI to VGA cable or a DVI to VGA converter (or vice versa) so that I can use a VGA only cable (if you get what I mean).

    That trackpad function sounds cool. I hear that they were adding iPhone touch like interface to the trackpad in the next line of Macbooks
     
  16. Jessy macrumors regular

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    NE Ohio
    #16
    Dual monitors = 2 screens. You can set them up to be virtually on top of each other or side-by-side. Hence, don't use one, lose about half your workspace.

    And the MacBook does not have a DVI connection. It has a mini-DVI port. Here is the simplest solution for you:

    http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/AppleStore.woa/wa/RSLID?mco=6C04E099&nplm=M9320G/A

    However, it might be better to get these two things instead, because DVI is a superior format, and if you ever get a better monitor, you can leave out the VGA path.

    http://www.firefold.com/ProductInfo.aspx?productid=DVI-M-VGA-F

    http://store.apple.com/1-800-MY-APPLE/WebObjects/AppleStore.woa/wa/RSLID?mco=6C04E07A&nplm=M9321G/B

    Can someone verify that the mini-DVI-to-DVI cable supports DVI-A?
     
  17. james6000 thread starter macrumors member

    james6000

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    Jul 3, 2007
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    UK
    #17
    Thanks for warning me about that, otherwise I would've gone out and wasted money on something that doesn't fit. I think I'll get the mini-dvi to vga adapter though, unlikely to buy a new monitor anytime soon.
     
  18. gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    #18
    Definitely not. Either use miniDVI-to-VGA adapter and connect to an analog VGA monitor, or use miniDVI-to-DVI adapter and connect to a digital DVI monitor. the miniDVI-to-DVI adapter doesn't support any analog signals.

    If your monitor only has a DVI-A cable (that is the monitor only supports analog, but using a DVI connector), then you need a miniDVI-to-VGA adapter, plus a VGA-to-DVI-A adapter.
     

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