Security Update 2005-009 Available


Lacero

macrumors 604
Jan 20, 2005
6,639
2
Thanks.

All of the security updates require reboots, especially updates to sudo and corefoundations.
 

puckhead193

macrumors G3
May 25, 2004
9,210
432
NY
2nyRiggz said:
really? i dont see it in update....maybe i'll check it again.

Bless
it came up for me, maybe i'm special :rolleyes: :p

Security Update 2005-009 delivers a number of security enhancements and is recommended for all Macintosh users.

This update includes the following components:

apache_mod_ssl
CoreFoundation
CoreTypes
curl
iodbcadmin
OpenSSL
Safari
sudo
syslog

For detailed information on this Update, please visit this website: http://www.info.apple.com/kbnum/n61798
 

Lacero

macrumors 604
Jan 20, 2005
6,639
2
Several Safari security fixes might bring about some compatibility issues like what happened with the 10.4.3 update for me. I'll wait until enough people have installed the security update to see if it negatively impacts Safari.
 

eva01

macrumors 601
Feb 22, 2005
4,714
0
Gah! Plymouth
Put on my powerbook right away, everything seems fine on my end.

Waiting to put it on powermac till tomorrow or the next day.

just in case ^_~
 

sord

macrumors 6502
Jun 16, 2004
352
0
2nyRiggz said:
wow...its like this update is only about safari....well most of it anyway.....which aint bad.


Nuff.
It updates Apache2 and mod_ssl for apache, CoreFoundation, curl, iodbcadmintool, OpenSSL, passwordserver, 3 Safari updates, sudo, and syslog. Most of it isn't Safari
 

Performa

macrumors member
Feb 26, 2005
46
0
iSaint said:
Does it require a restart? I'm just getting up to 27 days uptime...
I've read that it's good to restart your computer every so often, otherwise it may not operate optimally. I'm not sure if it's memory fragmentation or what...but I remember hearing that it may start doing weird things or just becomes sluggish if you don't do a restart now and then. I'm not sure how often it's recommended to restart though.

Do you think this isn't true?

Personally, if I get through one day without a crash or a freeze that requires a force quit and restart, it is an unusual day.
 

thomasp

macrumors 6502a
Sep 18, 2004
654
1
UK
Not showing up in software update on this 15" 1.5GHz PB, running OSX 10.4.2 - perhaps it needs 10.4.3?

Think I might wait a little bit before downloading either - I've got a lot of coursework on at uni, and I don't have my Tiger re-install discs with me, and I don't want anything to go wrong and lose use of my Mac for a few days :D
 

~Shard~

macrumors P6
Jun 4, 2003
18,388
42
1123.6536.5321
I'll install it when I get home, these updates never usually cause my system grief. I don't blame some of you for waiting though... ;)
 

nagromme

macrumors G5
May 2, 2002
12,551
1,186
Performa said:
I've read that it's good to restart your computer every so often, otherwise it may not operate optimally. I'm not sure if it's memory fragmentation or what...but I remember hearing that it may start doing weird things or just becomes sluggish if you don't do a restart now and then. I'm not sure how often it's recommended to restart though.

Do you think this isn't true?

Personally, if I get through one day without a crash or a freeze that requires a force quit and restart, it is an unusual day.
Are you running OS X? I pretty much said goodbye to system crashes and system degradation when I went to OS X. Now, Windows and Mac OS 9 did benefit from being restarted periodically. (And in OS X, if one app crashes or you force-quit it, it doesn't affect others--so you don't need to restart.)

One thing I have noticed about restarting OS X: it frees up a little disk space (temporarily). Helpful sometimes when I let my HD get COMPLETELY full. (Yes, it has happened--0 bytes free--and OS X did not lock up on me!)

Also, if occasional "weirdness" does happen to you on OS X, try just logging out and back in. Quicker than a restart. I'm thinking of things like icons looking wrong in Finder occasionally. (You can force-relaunch Finder too, though.)
 

manu chao

macrumors 603
Jul 30, 2003
6,347
2,335
Performa said:
Personally, if I get through one day without a crash or a freeze that requires a force quit and restart, it is an unusual day.
As it has been said umpteen times before, if OS X crashes often enough that you can remember the last time it crashed, you most likely have a hardware problem (or a problematic app going deep into the system like e.g. VirtualPC).

- Apple's hardware test CD
- Memtest (google for it)
- Diskwarrior
- misbehaving periphial
- at least a couple of GB of free disk space
 

manu chao

macrumors 603
Jul 30, 2003
6,347
2,335
thomasp said:
Not showing up in software update on this 15" 1.5GHz PB, running OSX 10.4.2 - perhaps it needs 10.4.3?
Security updates are like micro OS updates, they always apply only to the latest free version of the OS. Think of it as 10.4.3.1
 

chrisgeleven

macrumors 6502
Apr 28, 2002
446
10
Manchester, NH
Downloaded and installed

Just purchased my first mac (an iMac G5) a few days ago. This is the first security update I have had to do and it worked flawlessly as far as I can tell.

Cool.
 

Noiseboy

macrumors regular
Dec 25, 2002
213
18
Lurking nearby.
I've never had a problem after a security update, long may that be the case. I had a nasty freeze the other day which required a hard restart after which my Bluetooth was not recognized until I had rebooted three times, most curious:eek:
 

riwanami

macrumors member
Sep 4, 2003
72
0
Tokyo, Japan
Disconnection of Airport Express

I just installed the Security Update on my iMac G5. After the restart, I could not connect to my Airport Express (with WPA2) through my Cable internet connection. Similarly, I couldn't connect from my ThinkPad either. I unplugged the power from the Airport and plugged it back in, and now it works fine. I am not sure whether this was an issue with the update or just a concidental incident with my Airport, but at least no problems now!
 

jacg

macrumors 6502a
Jan 16, 2003
853
27
UK
Performa said:
I've read that it's good to restart your computer every so often, otherwise it may not operate optimally. I'm not sure if it's memory fragmentation or what...but I remember hearing that it may start doing weird things or just becomes sluggish if you don't do a restart now and then. I'm not sure how often it's recommended to restart though.

Do you think this isn't true?

Personally, if I get through one day without a crash or a freeze that requires a force quit and restart, it is an unusual day.
Are you sure every force quit needs to be followed by a restart? If you think the OS is being quirky, log out and in again. This usually solves any memory issues for me.

Edit: Ah, Nagromme, you were wise to point this out and I was foolish not to read the entire thread...
 

andrewm

macrumors regular
Apr 2, 2004
132
3
Los Angeles, CA
nagromme said:
Are you running OS X? I pretty much said goodbye to system crashes and system degradation when I went to OS X. Now, Windows and Mac OS 9 did benefit from being restarted periodically. (And in OS X, if one app crashes or you force-quit it, it doesn't affect others--so you don't need to restart.)

One thing I have noticed about restarting OS X: it frees up a little disk space (temporarily). Helpful sometimes when I let my HD get COMPLETELY full. (Yes, it has happened--0 bytes free--and OS X did not lock up on me!)

Also, if occasional "weirdness" does happen to you on OS X, try just logging out and back in. Quicker than a restart. I'm thinking of things like icons looking wrong in Finder occasionally. (You can force-relaunch Finder too, though.)
You neglect to consider that this 'rock-solid stability' comes, by most accounts, from the BSD/UNIX underbelly of Mac OS X--combined with an amazingly high-level, secure, and both extensive and extensible programming architecture called Cocoa, all of this imported from Apple's acquisition of NeXT.

Much else of what exists in OS X is written in Carbon, which hasn't nearly the security, yadda yadda yadda, of the NeXT stuff, but was coughed up ( in a magical hairball, no less ;) ) to allow legacy code to be ported over to OS X with less fuss. Steve Jobs, as a show of good faith to old-school programmers, had things like iTunes and the Finder (which already had a pre-existing Cocoa version)--and portions of the underlying operating system--ported into this Carbon language...

File management is handled largely with Carbon operations, on some level. Shouldn't we be a bit more wary of claiming that restarts due to garbage are unnecessary--*yet*--until we've ditched Carbon file-handling and Apple's aging, case-insensitive HFS+ (which has been around since System 8.1) and either invented some new file system or latched onto another existing one, such as the UFS that Apple also offers in its installers?
 

sboultbee

macrumors newbie
Oct 12, 2005
12
0
Concord, CA
Apache not updated in non-server version

I see that OS X Server has its Apache2 updated to the current release of 2.0.55. Unfortunately, they left the client version of OS X with Apache 1.3.33 (1.3.34 is the current release and it contains several security fixes).
 

Mechcozmo

macrumors 603
Jul 17, 2004
5,215
2
manu chao said:
Security updates are like micro OS updates, they always apply only to the latest free version of the OS. Think of it as 10.4.3.1
Erm. Not always. Security updates can apply to any 10.4 version sometimes, or any 10.3 version sometimes, or any 10.2 version sometimes.

I'd go against saying that security updates are micro OS updates.

mauly said:
How do I find my uptime? and why do people, don't like to reboot?
:confused:
Time for an [[uptime]] MacGuide page?

andrewm said:
Shouldn't we be a bit more wary of claiming that restarts due to garbage are unnecessary--*yet*--until we've ditched Carbon file-handling and Apple's aging, case-insensitive HFS+ (which has been around since System 8.1) and either invented some new file system or latched onto another existing one, such as the UFS that Apple also offers in its installers?
There is a case-sensitive version of HFS+. When you install Tiger's Disk Utility supports it. Be warned-- programers have not yet updated their programs to work with the 'real' filename and often times programs will not work correctly. This can be fixed by you manually rename files to what the program is looking for.

HFS+ has its roots in HFS, found in System 3. HFS+ was just an extension added on. If you have fewer than 65,000 files in a folder (or was it a disk?) and have the allocation blocks set correctly you can sometimes read HFS+ disks in System 7. It is a bit hit or miss, though. :confused: But HFS+ is needed because it allows for much greater support of the data/resource forks, a valuable part of the operating system.
 

manu chao

macrumors 603
Jul 30, 2003
6,347
2,335
andrewm said:
File management is handled largely with Carbon operations, on some level. Shouldn't we be a bit more wary of claiming that restarts due to garbage are unnecessary--*yet*--until we've ditched Carbon file-handling and Apple's aging, case-insensitive HFS+ (which has been around since System 8.1) and either invented some new file system or latched onto another existing one, such as the UFS that Apple also offers in its installers?
First, let me tell you. I have over the last couple of years restarted my Mac only a handfull of times to with the intention of trying to cure any file system related behaviourial oddities. Sure, it happens, but I stick to what I said before, when you can remember the last time you had to do a forced restart on your system, you have an underlying problem which is probably hardware related.