Snow Leopard includes PowerPC code...

Discussion in 'macOS' started by Amdahl, Sep 3, 2009.

  1. Amdahl macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2004
    #1
    Bad news haters.

    Even if you never 'install' Rosetta, PowerPC is still in yer system, slowin' U down.

    That means the only reason Rosetta has to be 'installed' is probably to reduce their licensing costs to Transitive (now IBM).

     
  2. gr8tfly macrumors 603

    gr8tfly

    Joined:
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    #2
    It's a library - how is it slowing the machine down when it's not executing?

    I still have many PPC apps I'd hate to lose (I'm not holding on to old revisions either - for example, I have PS CS4). Why should I lose that capability for a few MB of resources? Doesn't make any sense and that's why Rosetta's still available. It doesn't do anything, unless you're executing a PPC application.
     
  3. Amdahl thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Jul 28, 2004
    #3
    Yeah, I know. But some foolish people were claiming that PPC was 'slowing them down,' had to be dropped, and SL would finally free them from PPC.
     
  4. gr8tfly macrumors 603

    gr8tfly

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    #4
    Ah, I see. Another case of misusing a buzzword. I keep waiting for the "I want K64, 'cause I have to have it..." threads to slow down, but, alas...
     
  5. Ramashalanka macrumors regular

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    #5
    It couldn't be there because I upgraded from Leopard to Snow Leopard (rather than a clean install) could it? I would think that the Foundation.framework would be simply deleted and a new one copied over in the Snow Leopard upgrade process. I certainly haven't installed Rosetta (as the contents of my /private/var/db/dyld attest).

    I'm not at all bothered, of course, just curious.
     
  6. devburke Guest

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2008
    #6
    Well it could be slowing them down in the sense that some software is still PPC only, meaning Intel users have to run it in Rosetta, which is slower than running it natively.

    I had a version of an app with an annoying bug that was temporarily solved (until a bug fix came out) by running the PPC version of the app in Rosetta, and it was a lot slower.

    It’s not that having Rosetta itself installed is slowing down the computer, it’s the need to use it that slows things down.
     
  7. Amdahl thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2004
    #7
    No, it is not there because you upgraded. If Apple did something like that, it would be stored in one of the other 'Versions'.

    You've made a distinction that many Mac users are incapable of comprehending. Many are convinced that there is PPC code in their computers, sucking away their vital fluids.
     
  8. lewis82 macrumors 68000

    lewis82

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    Aug 26, 2009
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    Totalitarian Republic of Northlandia
    #8
    "How come there's still 32-bit code in 10.7? This is sooooo slowing down my machine!"
     
  9. Catfish_Man macrumors 68030

    Catfish_Man

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    Sep 13, 2001
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #9
    Technically it means a switch table somewhere in dyld has one extra entry, slightly reducing locality of reference ;)
     

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