So with rechargeable batteries, what are the electric costs?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by tzhu07, Mar 28, 2013.

  1. tzhu07 macrumors regular

    tzhu07

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2008
    #1
    This seems to be the one thing that people do not mention. They say rechargeables save money in the long run, especially with high drain devices, but how much does it add to the electric bill for every four AA charge?
     
  2. Jessica Lares macrumors G3

    Jessica Lares

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2009
    Location:
    Near Dallas, Texas, USA
    #2
    Our electric bill is less than $100 every month, and we have two Kindle Fires, two iPhones, an iPod Touch, and a Android. Plus my MBP. A pack of 8 AA batteries is like $5-10 depending on brand. It has to be a big savings really if we can power our entire house for less than $100 a month.

    And yeah, it DOES save money. Especially when you're talking about digital cameras, which can go through 8 of those in one day. Our rechargeables don't add much to our bill.
     
  3. heehee macrumors 68020

    heehee

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2006
    Location:
    Same country as Santa Claus
    #3
    Im pretty sure its a few cents per month. Our electric bill per month is less than $40 per month.
     
  4. mrsir2009 macrumors 604

    mrsir2009

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2009
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #4
    An iPhone 5 costs $0.41USD per year to charge (for the average person). So probably in the area of under a cent.
     
  5. jav6454 macrumors P6

    jav6454

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2007
    Location:
    1 Geostationary Tower Plaza
    #5
    The average cost of consuming a kiloWatt per hour in the US is around $0.12 (according to NPR).

    A charging iPod/iPhone consumes 5W per hour. Bear in mind, 1 kiloWatt (kW) is 1000W. In simple terms you are not even consuming 1% of a kilowatt which means your cost is less than 1% of that $0.12.

    In other words your iPhone or iPod consumes out of your pocket a mere $0.0012 per hour of charging (assuming 1% usage which no iOS device consumes ever).
     

Share This Page