So, you've always wanted to vacation on a helicopter?

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by ravenvii, Mar 29, 2009.

  1. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #2
    Meh. Too many problems. Noise. Vibration. Refueling. It's a helicopter, for cryin' out loud.

    Plus, I don't think I want to risk my life spending extended time in a Soviet aircraft.
     
  2. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

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    #3
    Sounds like fun.

    Although the noise would get to me after a while.
     
  3. notjustjay macrumors 603

    notjustjay

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    Canada, eh?
    #4
    What is this, Sky Captain? Those images are pretty silly.

    I took a helicopter ride over the Grand Canyon. Beautiful scenery, but I couldn't stand looking at it for very long because the shaking of the helicopter made me start to feel very sick.
     
  4. brad.c macrumors 68020

    brad.c

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    #5
    What's the point of staying in the air all the time? And once you land, what's the point of it being a helicopter?
     
  5. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #6
    The same point of a car remaining a car once you arrive. I don't know if you were hoping it'd 'transform' into a robot or something. ;)



    Besides, helicopters can land (and take-off) in areas you wouldn't be able to if you were in an airplane. I think that's the point of helicopters.
     
  6. brad.c macrumors 68020

    brad.c

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    #7
    Then that's one fugly RV, man. :D

    Something tells me this thing can't go to that many remote places. Maybe they should target the vanity rock star tour bus market.
     
  7. joepunk macrumors 68030

    joepunk

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    #8
    From their website

    ;)
     
  8. Dagless macrumors Core

    Dagless

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  9. peskaa macrumors 68020

    peskaa

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  10. Chip NoVaMac macrumors G3

    Chip NoVaMac

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    #11
    My thoughts exactly...
     
  11. Consultant macrumors G5

    Consultant

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    #12
    Fake. See above quote. Part of world might have started April fools already.

    If they are suppose to fly in a few months, they would have real photos instead of renderings.


    suppose to be soundproofed room. However see above.
     
  12. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #13
    Exactly.

    I don't understand this concept and why it would be appealing.

    That much is certain.

    Close to April 1st ... might be a fake.
     
  13. AoWolf macrumors 6502a

    AoWolf

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    #14
    Obviously fake however,

    I think a flying hotel could work but I think it would have to be a Zeppelin like dirigible. Just imagine sipping hot chocolate as you float over the north pole, or some tropical paradise...
     
  14. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #15
    Agree.

    Something where you can stay in the air for days and not a couple of hours.
     
  15. r.j.s Moderator emeritus

    r.j.s

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    #16
    Fake or not, it's still an interesting concept.
     
  16. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #17
    True.

    Saying that, there may be a limit of how long you can stay at one of these hotels due to health regulations on background radiation. There's a limit on the effective dose a person can receive without being considered a radiation worker. The general public gets an annual dose of around 3 mSv per year, while the limit for pilots and flight attendants is much more than that. That doesn't mean it's ok for pilots and flight attendants to get blasted by cosmic neutrons all the time, but that's another issue. Saying that, there's a limit on that as well (for major commercial airline pilots, at least), and it's accounted for by the total flight time.

    I don't know whether passengers would be allowed to stay on one of those for a week.
     
  17. Gray-Wolf macrumors 68030

    Gray-Wolf

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    #18
    There's no way it would work. With the weight it would have, it would eat fuel like you would not believe. And could not stay in the air more than a couple hours. Short of doing a tourist hopper, it would be worthless.
     
  18. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #19
    As big as it is, you can not land anywhere you want to. It would require a reinforced landing area due to the weight -- especially since it has tires.

    Anyhow, this has been added at the bottom of the article:

     
  19. dmr727 macrumors G3

    dmr727

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    #20
    Well crap, I wish I were an airline pilot - I just pumped about 0.1 mSv into my body today alone, and I'm pretty sure the FAA doesn't give a crap. :)
     
  20. SkyBell macrumors 604

    SkyBell

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    #21
    How much fuel does this thing use? That's a ridiculous waste.
     
  21. swiftaw macrumors 603

    swiftaw

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  22. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #23
    That's too bad. I think the reason there's no actual regulation is because pilots aren't technically considered "radiation workers" even though they should be. However, the airlines may have taken the responsibility of watching out for workers anyway. Perhaps that's why you're not being bothered by policy? ;)

    I think most radiation workers at US hospitals are supposed to get a maximum of around 20 mSv per year, while in certain other industries, they can get 30 or 40 mSv per year. I forget the standard because I haven't seen it brought up in quite awhile. The US has its own standards, but most countries just decided to use the same ones, or very similar. Why do the research themselves? :p Most people at risk would wear "thermoluminescent dosimeter" (TLD) badges to measure their radiation dose, but pilots get more damage from neutrons than x-rays, which means it's a bit trickier to measure. ;)

    As a private flight pilot, do you need to wear any sort of detector, or limit your flight time? :confused:
     
  23. dmr727 macrumors G3

    dmr727

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    #24
    No and no. And you're right, galactic radiation is the bigger problem for us. Unfortunately, it doesn't scale linearly with altitude, so in many cases I'm getting almost double the dosage at FL450 than the airline pilots ten thousand feet below me. However that's typically offset by the fact that most airline pilots work a lot more than I do. ;)

    If you're curious, the FAA set up a website where a pilot can get an estimate of the amount of (galactic) radiation they received for a given flight:

    http://jag.cami.jccbi.gov./cariprofile.asp
     
  24. jzuena macrumors 6502a

    jzuena

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    #25
    Well, DMR is more of a corporate/charter pilot than a private pilot. As for private pilots, they don't ever bring the subject of radiation up. They don't want to scare all the students away, after all.

    That's what you get for flying those sports cars of the airplane world:D Come on back to Cesna 172s and you won't have to worry about anything more than tenths of a microSv per flight:eek: Better yet, join us helicopter pilots down in the weeds (at least that's where you stuck-wingers tell us we belong!) and it drops to hundredths of a microSv per flight... can't say this hotelicopter thing would be welcome at the altitudes we normally fly at, though. Something that big at 1500agl might be a bit loud for the ground-folk.
     

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