MattXDA

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Aug 18, 2014
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Each year, there are some reports of iPhone preorders being stolen by delivery workers or unscrupulous passers by.

A good solution would be for each iPhone to be paired to your Apple ID on purchase, meaning that a 2 factor authentication code and your Apple ID would be required to set it up. This effectively means that the iPhone is protected at all stages of the delivery process.
This linking process could be done wirelessly by Apple while the iPhone is already boxed. (Phone checks its serial number with the Apple authentication server when initially powered on with internet access. Apple ID will be linked to serial number)

Thoughts?
 
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MattXDA

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Aug 18, 2014
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The scalpers wouldn't like this. Wouldn't they have to open the boxes then or can you unpair your ID remotely?
Would just be remote unpairing, like unlinking a device from your account. Shouldn’t be allowed though, to prevent the scalpers
 

Hal~9000

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Sep 13, 2014
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I like the OP's idea just as a general security measure against delivery drivers gone bad.

As for "passerbys" picking up a package off your doorstep I think that is a non-issue since as far as I'm aware of since Apple requires someone to actually physically sign for it (no leaving it at the doorstep).

Still a good idea though OP, scalpers might not be happy though ;)
 

eyoungren

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Aug 31, 2011
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As for "passerbys" picking up a package off your doorstep I think that is a non-issue since as far as I'm aware of since Apple requires someone to actually physically sign for it (no leaving it at the doorstep).
Apple does…carriers not so much.

If my wife hadn't been home when T-Mobile delivered our devices they would have been left at the door. Knock and run.
 
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joeblow7777

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Sep 7, 2010
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I like the OP's idea just as a general security measure against delivery drivers gone bad.

As for "passerbys" picking up a package off your doorstep I think that is a non-issue since as far as I'm aware of since Apple requires someone to actually physically sign for it (no leaving it at the doorstep).

Still a good idea though OP, scalpers might not be happy though ;)

Any delivery service I've ever encountered is supposed to require a signature for a package above a certain value, and an iPhone definitely qualifies. But there's always the stories about a lazy or negligent delivery person who doesn't care and just leaves it there.
 

noobinator

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Jun 19, 2009
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Any delivery service I've ever encountered is supposed to require a signature for a package above a certain value, and an iPhone definitely qualifies. But there's always the stories about a lazy or negligent delivery person who doesn't care and just leaves it there.

Well all that goes out the window if the drivers are the ones stealing them.
 
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joeblow7777

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Sep 7, 2010
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Well all that goes out the window if the drivers are the ones stealing them.

True, although it's probably not worth risking their jobs over. If they're supposed to get a signature and they don't, and the item goes missing, I would think that they are held responsible for it.
 

JPack

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Mar 27, 2017
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This is an example of a solution to the wrong problem.

Why is a courier delivery problem being resolved by placing additional burden on the customer? This negatively affects the Apple store online checkout experience by requiring an Apple ID. It negatively affects the out-of-box experience for millions of customers. Not to mention Apple spending additional time to support customers who can't remember their Apple ID at the time of purchase.

https://hbr.org/2012/09/are-you-solving-the-right-problem
 

CTHarrryH

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Jul 4, 2012
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Even if it all worked technically as planned - I doubt it would stop many thief. Not the smartest move anyway. And as stated by someone - you are buying a phone for someone who doesn't have an Apple ID? Or get it wrong and then you go through process to get straightened out. If the delivery stated must sign and agent didn't get signature I'd complain to company.
You can always change delivery to work etc.
 

HallStevenson

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May 1, 2012
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You didn’t read the part in brackets for some reason.
Sure I did, but it still doesn't make sense. In order to "link" it and do the authentication process once powered on by the 'owner', how is this link assigned to the phone ? You yourself said to do it "wirelessly by Apple while the phone is already boxed".
 
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brianric

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Jul 30, 2011
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Any delivery service I've ever encountered is supposed to require a signature for a package above a certain value, and an iPhone definitely qualifies. But there's always the stories about a lazy or negligent delivery person who doesn't care and just leaves it there.
That may be true in your case but not in my case. Olympus USA rountinely ships expensive cameras and lenses via FedEx with no signature required.
 

Applejuiced

macrumors Westmere
Apr 16, 2008
40,672
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At the iPhone hacks section.
IMG_0726.JPG


For years now carriers have a similar security feature on the initial 1st only activation of the device when it arrives by mail.
In other words even if it's stolen during shipping it's useless without the correct customer info entered in.
 
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MattXDA

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Aug 18, 2014
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Sure I did, but it still doesn't make sense. In order to "link" it and do the authentication process once powered on by the 'owner', how is this link assigned to the phone ? You yourself said to do it "wirelessly by Apple while the phone is already boxed".
When you buy a phone the serial number is already placed in your Apple Support Profile. The only difference is that when the phone is turned on, it sends its serial number to the Apple server and checks to see which Apple ID needs to be used to sign in
 

JPack

macrumors 604
Mar 27, 2017
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When you buy a phone the serial number is already placed in your Apple Support Profile. The only difference is that when the phone is turned on, it sends its serial number to the Apple server and checks to see which Apple ID needs to be used to sign in

Customers don't need an Apple ID to make a purchase online. They can check out as a guest. In those cases, there's no serial number recorded in any Support Profile.
 

MattXDA

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Aug 18, 2014
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Customers don't need an Apple ID to make a purchase online. They can check out as a guest. In those cases, there's no serial number recorded in any Support Profile.
Not when the idea is implemented, Apple IDs for all
 

noobinator

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Jun 19, 2009
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Pasadena, CA
Yeah the more I think about this, the worse idea it is. The fact that some people buying an iPhone don't even have an Apple ID yet makes this plan not feasible. Then the fact that it inconveniences customers in many ways is another deal breaker.
 

Beenblacklisted

macrumors 6502
Dec 28, 2011
430
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Miami,Fl
Each year, there are some reports of iPhone preorders being stolen by delivery workers or unscrupulous passers by.

A good solution would be for each iPhone to be paired to your Apple ID on purchase, meaning that a 2 factor authentication code and your Apple ID would be required to set it up. This effectively means that the iPhone is protected at all stages of the delivery process.
This linking process could be done wirelessly by Apple while the iPhone is already boxed. (Phone checks its serial number with the Apple authentication server when initially powered on with internet access. Apple ID will be linked to serial number)

Thoughts?
your killing off many businesses ,who help customers in countries with no apple store, get the iphones they want.
 

HallStevenson

macrumors 6502a
May 1, 2012
525
318
In the end those packages are insured against theft, loss or damage during shipping.
Actually, they may not be. One thing UPS or Fedex will do with large-volume shippers is offer even better rates than the rates they can already get, by dropping any 'liability' options (or capping it). Found this out at my previous employer when a co-worker filed a damage claim. He did all the steps of the process, including providing an invoice for a one-off, machined part made of a high-alloy material (it was thousands of dollars). All through the claims process, no one at the carrier said anything... A couple weeks later, he rec'd a check for $100 (US). That was the maximum they pay out on claims (in return for really good rates).

Remember, Apple ships computers, iPhones, iPods, etc direct from China, using 2-day service in many cases and those rates can't be cheap. But they get so much of a discount, they can "afford" to have a few devices lost. UPS and Fedex do lose or damage "x" packages per day so given Apple's volume, that % will hit Apple's shipments too.
 

Applejuiced

macrumors Westmere
Apr 16, 2008
40,672
6,532
At the iPhone hacks section.
Yes, but that's not what Apple does or how they do business.
You wont get your device stolen and only get $100 check or anything like that.
Someone will eat the loss and that will not be the customer that's for sure.


Actually, they may not be. One thing UPS or Fedex will do with large-volume shippers is offer even better rates than the rates they can already get, by dropping any 'liability' options (or capping it). Found this out at my previous employer when a co-worker filed a damage claim. He did all the steps of the process, including providing an invoice for a one-off, machined part made of a high-alloy material (it was thousands of dollars). All through the claims process, no one at the carrier said anything... A couple weeks later, he rec'd a check for $100 (US). That was the maximum they pay out on claims (in return for really good rates).

Remember, Apple ships computers, iPhones, iPods, etc direct from China, using 2-day service in many cases and those rates can't be cheap. But they get so much of a discount, they can "afford" to have a few devices lost. UPS and Fedex do lose or damage "x" packages per day so given Apple's volume, that % will hit Apple's shipments too.
 
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