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Alongside the launch of iOS 9.1, Sprint has implemented an enhanced Wi-Fi calling feature for its users, allowing them to make and receive calls on multiple iOS and Mac devices over Wi-Fi or a cellular connection.

Prior to today, it was possible for Sprint users to make and receive calls from iPads and Macs using an iPhone's cellular connection, but that functionality did not extend to calls placed over Wi-Fi when cellular signal was low.

The iOS call forwarding feature implemented with iOS 8 that allowed users to make and receive calls from multiple devices required Wi-Fi calling to be turned off, but that is no longer the case. Calls placed or received on devices other than an iPhone will now work over a cellular connection and when connected to Wi-Fi with Wi-Fi calling in use.

Receiving calls on multiple devices with the call forwarding feature also required devices to be on the same Wi-Fi network as an iPhone, but with enhanced Wi-Fi calling, that's no longer necessary. In fact, an iPad or a Mac can still receive a call when an iPhone is in another location entirely or turned off.

Sprint users can access the new enhanced Wi-Fi calling feature by downloading iOS 9.1, watchOS 2, or OS X 10.11.1 on their devices and making sure Wi-Fi calling is enabled on an iPhone by going to Settings --> Phone --> Wi-Fi Calling. Other devices can be set up to receive calls by going to Settings --> FaceTime --> Calls from iPhone. All devices must use the same Apple ID and they must be signed into iCloud.

These advanced Wi-Fi calling features, which are outlined in an updated Apple Support document on Wi-Fi calling, are also available to T-Mobile users in the United States. While AT&T and several other international carriers have implemented support for Wi-Fi calling, it does not extend to the enhanced Wi-Fi calling feature available to Sprint and T-Mobile users.

Article Link: Sprint Announces Enhanced Wi-Fi Calling Feature for iOS 9.1 Users
 

joueboy

macrumors 68000
Jul 3, 2008
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Is the enhanced WiFi Calling advertised by Sprint is better than other carrier because of the word enhance?
 
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ptb42

macrumors 6502a
Oct 14, 2011
703
184
I've been happy with the AT&T WiFi calling feature.

For some reason, my signal at my house is wildly variable. When it drops below a certain level (1 dot?), it switches to Wi-Fi calling and I don't miss incoming calls.

I have also worked at customers where I have no AT&T signal at all, but my Verizon WiFi hotspot (supplied by my employer) has a strong signal. This makes it possible for me to use that for phone calls.
 
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Aniseedvan

macrumors 65816
May 14, 2012
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Is the enhanced WiFi Calling advertised by Spri nt is better than other carrier because of the word enhance?
It's being able to make and receive calls without the phone being turned on which is what others don't yet do..
 

joueboy

macrumors 68000
Jul 3, 2008
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It's being able to make and receive calls without the phone being turned on which is what others don't yet do..

Ok, I got it. But I think it's more on the Continuity feature of iOS & OSX. I have WiFi Calling on T-Mobile but once turned on the forwarding call feature to my iPad and iMac is disabled. I still don't understand why this feature is carrier exclusive instead of an iOS feature. Makes me wonder if Apple starts taking money from carriers to have some exclusive features turned-on for marketing purposes, afterall this is what Tim likes to do anyway. I love WiFi calling but it seems like this encourages carriers stop improving their network. A mentality that "hey they can still receive calls in their house we don't need a tower in that area'" kind of attitude. Because they can spend millions advertising how better their network than the other, yet just a fraction when it comes to improving their services.
 
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CEmajr

macrumors 601
Dec 18, 2012
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Charlotte, NC
It's being able to make and receive calls without the phone being turned on which is what others don't yet do..
No it allows using the continuity features of calling from a Mac or iPad while wi-if calling is on. Prior to that you had to either turn off wifi calling or turn off calling from other devices. Had to choose one or the other.

T-Mobile already has this feature, AT&T still doesn't.
 

DeanL

macrumors 65816
May 29, 2014
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London
Does that mean that you could technically start multiple calls (one from you iPhone, iPad, Mac...) at the same time but independently?
Because these devices are now able to reach the carrier directly through the IP instead of reaching the iPhone for it to dial...
 

avanpelt

macrumors 68030
Jun 2, 2010
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Sprint is now able to allow users to make a regular phone call from a Mac or an iPad even when the iPhone is turned off? How'd they manage to do that?

Oh wait, I get it. The calls hardly go through with the phone so if you just turn the phone off, you have the same experience on your iPad and Mac, as well. ;)
 

xero9

macrumors 6502a
Nov 7, 2006
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I don't think that's accurate...

That is absolutely 100% accurate. This is not continuity that was introduced in iOS 8. This is your Mac or iPad connecting directly to the carrier for the phone calls via wifi.
 

markgpearse

macrumors 6502
Nov 11, 2010
283
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I have this with tmobile. It's really exciting when I'm working at my iMac, with my Apple Watch on my wrist and my iPhone nearby and my iPad not much further way and a call comes in...
 
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Aniseedvan

macrumors 65816
May 14, 2012
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That is absolutely 100% accurate. This is not continuity that was introduced in iOS 8. This is your Mac or iPad connecting directly to the carrier for the phone calls via wifi.

Exactly; not having to worry if I leave my phone at home and I'm 2 hours drive away.
I've only just enabled wifi calling myself on EE this week as I was on t-mobile (UK). I don't personally have much use for it unless they turn on "enhanced".
 

avanpelt

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Jun 2, 2010
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I'd like to know how they're able to accomplish this. Since it still works when the phone is powered off, Apple must be storing the carrier information the user's Apple account so that the Macs and iPads associated with the account are able to call out when the phone is off.

I know Sprint phones are locked domestically but I wonder what happens if the phone is unlocked for international use and you go overseas and put an overseas SIM in the iPhone? Is the Mac/iPad still able to use Sprint's Wi-Fi calling with your U.S. phone number without needing the iPhone because it has done so previously? My guess is no because Sprint probably wouldn't allow that; but I don't see any reason why the Mac or iPad wouldn't be able to do so since they don't even need the iPhone to be turned on in order to make/receive calls now.
 

aristobrat

macrumors G5
Oct 14, 2005
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I'd like to know how they're able to accomplish this. Since it still works when the phone is powered off, Apple must be storing the carrier information the user's Apple account so that the Macs and iPads associated with the account are able to call out when the phone is off.
AT&T says its similar-sounding service is "a standards-based, network approach that will make connecting a wide variety of devices easier to give you a better user experience", which makes it sound like it's not an Apple-exclusive feature.
 

avanpelt

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Jun 2, 2010
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AT&T says its similar-sounding service is "a standards-based, network approach that will make connecting a wide variety of devices easier to give you a better user experience", which makes it sound like it's not an Apple-exclusive feature.

That is interesting. I wonder if AT&T will treat smart watches, computers, and tablets that are using NumberSync as additional on-network devices and charge $5 per month per device for the "privilege" of those devices having direct access to AT&T's network without needing the phone? It wouldn't surprise me one bit if they pull something like that. We'll have to wait and see.
 
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apunkrockmonk

macrumors 6502a
Nov 20, 2005
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Rochester, NY
As soon as I upgraded my T-Mobile iPhone 6 to the first iOS 9 beta I had this functionality.

When I regressed back to 8.4 to await the final version of 9 I lost this functionality.

As soon as the public release of 9 came out I regained this functionality.

Sprint is just catching up here...
 

rdlink

macrumors 68040
Nov 10, 2007
3,226
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Out of the Reach of the FBI
Verizon...? Verizon...?

I know you have to pretend you're wearing clothes, Emperor. But we all know your network has its really crappy spots, also. Some of them in major cities. Your public arrogance about the superiority of your network would be hilarious, if it weren't so infuriating.
 
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C DM

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Oct 17, 2011
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Hurry up Verizon!
Verizon...? Verizon...?

I know you have to pretend you're wearing clothes, Emperor. But we all know your network has its really crappy spots, also. Some of them in major cities. Your public arrogance about the superiority of your network would be hilarious, if it weren't so infuriating.
Seriously. I don't get how Verizon is so far behind not just one service that has it, but basically all the top ones that it competes against that have it now and are enhancing and improving it.
 
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