Taking the Plunge

Discussion in 'iMac' started by raineysky, Feb 28, 2017.

  1. raineysky macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2016
    Location:
    DeRidder, Louisiana
    #1
    Looking to buy the 3.3 i5 2015 model with the 2tb fusion drive off of eBay. I pretty much know the new models are coming because the 2015 models are getting more reasonable.

    Never had a Mac before and kernel panics and such have me panicking. Always had mainly Dells and they lasted several years until the bugs took them over.

    I have software that only works on Windows, so I guess I'll need virtual software.

    Just need some Love and tell me I'm doing the right thing. Always wanted one. The wife is going to kill me.
     
  2. decafjava macrumors 68000

    decafjava

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Location:
    Geneva
    #2
    Well I recently took the plunge with a new system (in my sig) and am very pleased with my purchase. Go for it you won't be sorry!
     
  3. Rivanov macrumors member

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    Dec 28, 2010
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    Netherlands
    #3
    If the price is right and you don't mind to own a 'dated' model within the next month or so, you'll be fine! :)
     
  4. Samuelsan2001 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    #4
    Go for it that's a great machine, you can use a VM or boot camp for your Windows apps, if they are fairly light a VM will be fine, if they are fairly heavy you'll want to boot camp for the full power of the machine.

    Just have a quick check on the dGPU configuration if gaming is part of your usage.
     
  5. ZomBee macrumors member

    ZomBee

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2014
    #5
    I just took the plunge and got a 4g i7, 3tb, 32gig (self-upgrade) for work. I'd do it all over in a heartbeat. Love this machine. :)
     
  6. Lunder89 macrumors regular

    Lunder89

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    Oct 16, 2014
    Location:
    Denmark
    #6
    Treat a Mac well, and it will very rarely fail you. From someone who works with a mixed environment every day (PC's and Mac's), the Macs cause headaches a lot less frequently than PC's (in my experience).

    And depending on what you need and do, the Mac can also be a great time saver. I have learned that iMovie can replace every non-pro, and several pro video editors that exists for Windows. And generally working with media content, the Mac offers a lot more opportunities, if you go looking for them.

    Oddly enough Microsoft Office 2016 also, in my opinion, works better with the Mac, than with Windows.

    And some technical stuff is even easier on the Mac. (Creating restore images, for one).

    But coming from Windows, there is a few things you will need to get used to. The Dock and the menubar and the way windows (windows, not Windows) are handled takes a little getting used to. Especially if you keep working the the PC. I find that I often miss the window switching ALT+TAB, instead of the app switching CMD+TAB on Mac.

    Apple has also made a few setup decisions, and not all are great. The Finder as an example (the Mac version of Explorer), is by default set, to open a window with all your files (pictures, music, documents, presentations and so on), which is fine on systems with 100 files. But when you have a little over 15,000 files, it is useless. You can change it, but there will be some of the these settings around the system that you might want to change.
    I usually also set my Mac up, to arrange all folders contents by name, and locking them in a grid, which is not a default, and coming from Windows where it is, is a little annoying, until you find the setting and lock it as a default. (or maybe I just don't like messy folders)

    I bought my first Mac in 2007, and I havn't looked back since, so be careful. Once you go Mac, you can never go back. And these things are a little expensive, and difficult to ever get away from ;).
     
  7. raineysky thread starter macrumors newbie

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  8. InlawBiker macrumors 6502

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  9. cynics, Mar 2, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2017

    cynics macrumors G3

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    Jan 8, 2012
    #9
    I think you'll be very happy. My only suggestion would be to not try to force a windows way of thinking onto MacOS. There are a lot of fundamental differences that are best learned not worked around. Finder (Windows Explorer replacement) for example was a tough one for me, just the way MacOS handles files was so foreign to me. But now it makes much more sense then Windows to me.
    --- Post Merged, Mar 2, 2017 ---
    Thanks for the review. I wouldnt consider a higher spec'd iMac more "future proofed". Things you'll eventually want to upgrade for likely won't come from faster CPU's or GPU's but from usb specs, thunderbolt specs, screen tech, bluetooth/wifi specs (I waited for the 2013 for wifi AC), design, faster SSD tech, maybe some sort of Apple proprietary technology, etc etc.

    A middle of the road iMac could actually be more advantageous for some. Thats what I have now, and when I upgrade again will be for a 5k screen and PCIe SSD, two things that were unavailable even on a maxed out 2013 iMac.

    Just a thought. Might ease the minds of many people that don't have or are considering not getting a maxed out iMac.
     
  10. Lunder89 macrumors regular

    Lunder89

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2014
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    Denmark
    #10
    As for advice number one, listen to it. Try to solve everything without Windows. That way, the transition will be a lot easier.

    And when purchasing a Mac, of course specs are important, but oddly enough, not always the most important. All the things around a Mac, is the things that can annoy. Now you don't write it, but I suspect it is the 27" 5k iMac you are buying (current generation, top tier with AMD Radeon R9 M395 graphics), and it seems it is the only iMac in a long time, that doesn't overheat and have performance throttling, when under a heavy work/gaming load. My 5k iMac is the mid tier with the R9 M390 graphics, and I no problems with overheating or performance throttling.
    Also I can see several 2014 iMacs (27") are having display problems, the 2015 model doesn't seem to have these problems.

    I think all around, the 2015 iMac 27" is one of the best iMacs Apple has built. Ever. I have wanted one for 10 years, and the 2015 models doesn't seem to have any strange things going on. Many previous iMacs do, often with the screen and the graphics card.

    And lastly, waiting for the 2017 model might be a bad idea. Apple may remove all the regular USB ports, which I would find annoying on a desktop, that doesn't need to get thinner or lighter, for transport purpose. The longest journey my iMac takes, is from my desk in my Office, and in to my living room, close to the antenna for my TV, when I need to record something on the tele, and that happens about once or twice a year. I still use many USB peripherals with the USB A standard. (Joypad, Blu-Ray drive, harddrives, TV-Tuner)
    I get it, it needs some USB C ports, I just hope it is not at the cost of USB A. But I fear it. They might also raise the price, though that is guess work.
     
  11. decafjava macrumors 68000

    decafjava

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Location:
    Geneva
    #11
    Helpful advice indeed, hard for me as I worked with windows and still use it at work though I will be working from home more often now.

    Wow, I hit the jackpot with my first Mac then, it's the same model as yours.

    I really hope not, but at least I will be using this computer for quite a few years to come...
     
  12. raineysky thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2016
    Location:
    DeRidder, Louisiana
    #12
    Good advice Lunder89 and cynics. Funny, but I have never seen a Mac in person or have known anyone who uses them. My work always required Windows. Fonts though have always been a big deal to me and Macs do them best I'm told (along with a host of other things). At 56 years of age I'm ready to take a walk on the wild side again :)
     
  13. vrBrew Suspended

    vrBrew

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    Mar 3, 2017
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    High life, High times
    #13
    I have been using iMacs since 2000, upgrading every 2 years. Between my wife, kids and I, I have always had 2 iMacs, Mac Pro, and MBP running. I sell the older systems on eBay.

    I have always chosen the upgraded CPU and storage option. Then used 3rd party memory upgrades. I would sooner get an i7 over an i5. Max CPU per version of iMac will get you more years before you need to get an upgrade.
     
  14. iMas70 macrumors 6502a

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    Sep 4, 2012
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    MA
    #14
    Are there any drawbacks to buying the current 27" iMac instead of waiting for Apple to release a new version? I prefer to have the latest and greatest and not buy a machine that's close to 2 years old (I know it's still great :) ) but I don't know when they will provide us with something new. I'd like to buy one this month so I'm hoping to get good news during the March event. The lack of rumors makes that seem doubtful.
     
  15. Lunder89 macrumors regular

    Lunder89

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    Denmark
    #15
    The current generation iMac is on last years processors with skylake CPU and the R9 M3XX graphics series, both have newer versions available. They are missing USB C and therefore also Thunderbolt 3, but I think that is about what they are lacking.

    I don't think we will see an update to iMac in march though. Rumors about a refresh currently seems more like wishful thinking than actual rumors. The latest macOS Sierra betas doesn't seem to contain any new iMac stuff (like drivers or model-ids). If we are to see a march introduction, someone needs to dig something out of the next beta release of macOS Sierra, otherwise chances of a refresh is extremely low.
    Windows is almost everywhere, so only using Mac is difficult, but during a transition, doing as much on a Mac as possible makes the Mac easier to get used to. My first mac was a 2007 MacBook White, and a portable you can bring with you makes it a lot easier to make it your only computer.

    The 2015 iMac seems solid, I havn't found any weaknesses in the one year I have owned mine, various sources reveals problems for pretty much every previous generation, going all the way back to the first aluminum iMacs in 2007. So since the 2015 is also my first iMac, I feel lucky too.

    And as for Apples next generation iMac, what they will do, no one knows. But based on what they did with the latest MacBook Pro, I have my fears.
     
  16. cynics macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2012
    #16
    I agree USB C will be annoying for many users but with an iMac it won't be quite as bad as many think. Plus it will add a pretty good level of future proofing especially if they are all TB3 spec'd USB C's.

    Its a hassle with a MacBook because very few things out the real world can you interact with use USB C. So you are forced to carry more stuff around then you might typically.

    However with an iMac all we will need to do is get a few USB C to micro USB cables and maybe a USB C to mini USB (to avoid dongles of course) to connect to our current peripherals.

    https://www.amazon.com/CableCreatio...r=8-2-spons&keywords=usb+c+to+micro+usb&psc=1

    And then a couple dongles/adaptors for thumb drives and current USB hubs (probably Type A negating some of the above linked cables). Or USB C Hubs

    And finally maybe a couple USB C to Lightning, again I prefer cables over dongles to minimize connections.

    Others may need new thunderbolt cables or adaptors too.

    Now I'm not saying all that isn't annoying because it is, but if you are buying a new iMac knowing it has USB C to begin with it shouldn't be all that bad. Spend 30 or so bucks and you are set, plus you now have all the benefits of USB C now if you need it and certainly in the future. This type of thing is what I was talking about when I think "future proofing" and honesty I'm glad Apple is leading the charge on this one.

    A current benefit I'm thinking of would be USB hubs that don't need external power because the USB C ports can provide more than USB A spec ports. Other benefits include reduce cost for current TB cables and adaptors since more and more products are coming out with USB C/TB3 ports such as monitors. No more fulling around with adaptors from TB.

    I think the thing that makes it a hassle for many, myself included is everything comes with a USB A cable so new products may cause you to need to buy a new cable. Also everyone, including myself has a drawer full of USB A cables while USB C isn't so abundant quite yet. Also until everyone gets on board with it you'll need a dongle (or USB A hub with USB C connector) if you carry around a usb thumb drive since you typically use them between multiple systems. And something I just find frustrating with it is you can buy a 4000 dollar MBP and a 1000 dollar iPhone, take them home and not have a way to plug them into each other. If Apple wants to push the tech then they should include an adaptor in the box (they don't right? lol)!

    You have to admit four 4k monitors out of a MacBook is pretty impressive. Sure very few of us will ever do it, but it illustrates how powerful those ports can be and its hard to even guess how it will be leveraged in the future.

    EDIT : And another benefit....its reversible! *drops mic* (sarcasm intended)
     
  17. Lunder89 macrumors regular

    Lunder89

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    #17
    Oh I don't deny the possibilities of USB C, it is a very versatile port. But on a desktop, where things isn't forced to be thin, it wouldn't make sense in my world to do USB C only. Not yet anyway, since USB C still is very new, and not many peripherals come with USB C connections yet.

    Sure you can get external storage as USB C, but some people use more than external storage.

    I know USB C is the future, and Apple pushes for the future, but this time with the MBP, they have in my opinion pushed too hard. MPB is a computer used by a lot of prosumers, myself included. And I still use most of the ports, and getting adapters and cables defeats the purpose of a lighter computer, because all the adapters and cables in the bag weighs more than the MPB lost.

    Plus the expense of the computer, adding alle the cables and adapters, I just can't spend money on that in good conscious. The MBP is overpriced, it can't connect to anything without an expensive adapter or a new cable, it is a terrible successor to MBP line, and if I had to buy a new MBP today, I would still by the old model, it is less expensive, it comes with alle the ports a prosumer needs, and it is not that much slower.

    And if the next iMac comes with USB C only, then I am happy I bought mine before that was the case. I think a 5K iMac is expensive enough, and then to need to buy expensive adapters, for an expensive computer, when it has no purpose having only USB C. If they leave one or two USB A ports on the next generation iMac, then I would be in a good mood. And keep at the same price as know, it doesn't need a price jump, like the MBP.
     
  18. Samuelsan2001 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2013
    #18
    It's not that they want USBc per se it's that thunderbolt 3 has a USB c port configuration and Can do both USB c and thunderbolt making it the easiest to use and most versatile port around.

    Most things with a cable attachment has a separate cable i.e. Hard drives etc and you just need to change the cable to a USB c version, these are less than $5 on Amazon. The whole port thing is a non issue 90% of the time replacement cables are cheap and plentiful and don't need a dongle.
     
  19. iKaushal macrumors 6502

    iKaushal

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2011
    Location:
    Mumbai, India
    #19
    My late 2011 MBP 15" had a graphics failure and the extended apple coverage ended on 31st Dec.

    So had to get another one.

    Took the plunge by getting iMac 5K 27" model...and its amazing.
     

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