Testing LAN speeds of various devices

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by rhett7660, Sep 13, 2017.

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  1. rhett7660 macrumors G5

    rhett7660

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Location:
    Sunny, Southern California
    #1
    Hello,

    Is there a way to test the local speeds and also see what is being used the most on my LAN?

    I have two switches and a router installed on my network with various items connected to the switches etc. However I would like to see all the devices that are connected and how much of my bandwidth each device is using. Is there something out there that will do this?

    I can get a list of items from router, but it doesn't tell me how much of my network they are using.
     
  2. mfram macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2010
    Location:
    San Diego, CA USA
    #2
    Generally only enterprise-class "managed" switches are going to provide such functionality. I have never seen that feature in consumer-grade switches. But maybe someone knows of one that can.
     
  3. rhett7660 thread starter macrumors G5

    rhett7660

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Location:
    Sunny, Southern California
    #3
    Thanks for the response as that is what I have been reading also, but I am wondering if there is something that can I load on Computer A and on Computer B and see the path that is taken and the overall speed in which that file is transferred at? I have a couple of switches (Un-managed) in my network and I am just trying to figure out if I am running at the optimal speed or if there is a bottle neck somewhere in my data flow.
     
  4. imaccooper macrumors 6502

    imaccooper

    Joined:
    May 29, 2014
    Location:
    North Carolina
    #4
    First off, the bottleneck is never in the network. It is always something else's fault (yes this is a joke, but all of us network guys need to say this).

    Anyways, if I follow what you are trying to do, it appears you are running files between computers on your network. I have seen a couple of software applications that may test your LAN speed, but they aren't going to be able to tell you it went from this computer a to hub a this fast and so on. Unmanaged hubs just don't do that. What you will likely see from a software application is your files transferred at x mbps and thats about all you are going to learn from it. The only way to narrow it down to specific segments of your LAN would be to have higher grade managed switches.

    Also, I could take both of your posts and easily describe a small business or a typical house. For instance, you could have two 4 port hubs that are plugged into your TV and computer or whatever in different places, or you could have larger 24-48 port hubs that are running throughout an entire business with 50 people or more. I don't really know where you fit on that scale based on what you have said so far. You also mentioned router which may be involved depending on how your devices are plugged in. If both of your hubs are plugged into the back of the router so that all traffic must pass through it, then the router information is also important. If one of your hubs is plugged into the other hub, then it is less important. So here are a couple of questions that might help me give you some better ideas.

    1. What hubs and router are you using?
    2. How many people are on this network during these file transfers?
    3. What types of files are you transferring and what size are they?
    4. Is any of this done over the internet via cloud syncing or anything like that?
    5. Do you have any security items set up that inspects traffic passed through it?
    6. Is this just a personal curiosity or are you have speed trouble and suspect a problem?
    Related: How long does it take you now to transfer one of your typical files asked about in #3?

    Depending on your answers, it may be apparent if you have any weak links just based on what the devices can do.
     
  5. hobowankenobi macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2015
    Location:
    on the land line mr. smith.
    #5
    Years ago I used a free tool from a german company that would measure file sharing speed from machine A to machine B.

    Keep in mind, it won't tell you why: network (cabling, termination, switches, etc, etc), disk read/write speed, network traffic/congestion, and so on...could all contribute to bottlenecks. And dependent on specific file sharing protocols, all of which have their own quirks as I understand it.

    But still useful.

    Hey look! Still available. What a perfectly sensible (german after all...) name: LanTest

    Have not used it in years, but handy. It was good to at look as file transfer speed one hop away from the main switch (say a dedicated file server), and then check downstream in other buildings, behind other switches, etc. Get a benchmark and compare, and do spot checks. I'm sure there are much more sophisticated ways, but useful.

    At the very least, you see and compare exactly how fast files move, even if the WHY is left unanswered.
     
  6. rhett7660 thread starter macrumors G5

    rhett7660

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Location:
    Sunny, Southern California
    #6
    Yes this is exactly what I am looking for. See answers below.

    House has been hard wired with Cat 6
    1. What hubs and router are you using? Switches:
    In media closet: TRENDned 24 port 10/100/1000
    At my TV Media: D-Link DGS-2208 8 port 10/100/1000
    Thank you amazon.com
    2. How many people are on this network during these file transfers? 2
    3. What types of files are you transferring and what size are they? Mainly media, movies, etc from two of the computers Mac Pro and Mac Mini to Synology NAS box with two network cables attached.
    4. Is any of this done over the internet via cloud syncing or anything like that? All done via LAN no Internet
    5. Do you have any security items set up that inspects traffic passed through it? I do not
    6. Is this just a personal curiosity or are you have speed trouble and suspect a problem? More like congestion problems. I have a lot of home automation items (light switches and thermostat being used, non-homekit, along with Sonos speakers x4) Throw in two iPhones, two iPad Mini's (one used as a remote iRULE, and one used by the wife). Three Apple Express Wifi points that are hard wired)
    Related: How long does it take you now to transfer one of your typical files asked about in #3? Various, see #6.
     
  7. imaccooper macrumors 6502

    imaccooper

    Joined:
    May 29, 2014
    Location:
    North Carolina
    #7
    One additional question, how is your stuff wired? Obviously your modem is somewhere then you have your router. Where does it go from there? Do you just have one wire going to the trednet and then everything branches out from there or is anything else attached to your router?

    Other than potentially a different structure, based on what you’ve said, there isn’t much more your going to do with your current equipment. Are you looking to upgrade your stuff or just looking to optimize what you have? If it’s the latter, then there isn’t much else your going to be able to do to optimize your hardwired setup with the equipment you mentioned.
     
  8. hobowankenobi macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2015
    Location:
    on the land line mr. smith.
    #8
    Those are big switches. Lots of ports...for a home. Most of them in use?

    Hopefully your cabling is in good shape: no damage (bad kinks can damage solid core wire), good termination, etc.

    I notice a NAS....some older/low end models are just plain slow. Great for backups, etc. but not great for high performance needs. Don't forget that HDs slow down as they fill....so anything over about 70% full could contribute to slow file transfer speeds.

    It is great to have a cable tester to verify you are getting Gbit speeds everywhere. If you can't lay hands on one, any MacBook plugged into any cable will tell you Gbit or Mbit connection:

    Open Sys Prefs/Network, select the Ethernet Port, Click Advanced, and then open the Hardware tab.

    If you see less than 1000, then it is likely that cable has bad termination (all 8 wires must be correctly terminated to get 1000/Gbit speed; 6 wires will give 100/Mbit; 4 wires will give 10).

    And don't forget Network Utility. Apple has buried it...but it is still there and useful.
     
  9. rhett7660, Sep 21, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2017

    rhett7660 thread starter macrumors G5

    rhett7660

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Location:
    Sunny, Southern California
    #9
    I have a media closet upstairs where the main modem and trednet sit. Then yes you are correct about the second switch is at the media cabinet where I have several devices connected to it (seven to be exact).

    Ideally, I just wanted to see if I was getting the right speeds of my equipment and also see what the saturation point is since I am seeing slowing down when accessing the internet. I have cat 6 cable ran everywhere I need x2. I don't plan on updating anytime soon, more just trying to see if I am getting the true speeds or close to throughout my network. Rats.
    --- Post Merged, Sep 21, 2017 ---
    The 48 port switch is just over half full. Purchased it for future expansion.

    Thanks for the tip I will have to check that out. I am 99% sure there are no issues with the wiring. but that pesky .1% one never knows!

    The NAS box is a new box and screams for a NAS box. Not to worried about that. I am mainly looking to see if I am getting the correct speeds on my hardwired system and also seeing if maybe I am saturating or causing slow downs when accessing devices or the internet with so many of my devices.
     

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8 September 13, 2017