The Many Glen Avon, CA Earthquakes

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by BigMcGuire, Jun 2, 2019.

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  1. BigMcGuire Contributor

    BigMcGuire

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Location:
    California
    #1
    Anyone near Fontana California?

    If so you're maybe feeling the many many tiny earthquakes that are hitting Glen Avon, CA over and over and over.

    http://scedc.caltech.edu/recent/Maps/118-34.html

    I've lived in CA for most of my life - never seen so many tiny earthquakes hit one place like this, over and over. I was here for the 1994 Northridge quake.

    We're about 14 miles from the epicenter so everything over a 2.2 we feel pretty good.

    Just curious if anyone on these forums are feeling these too.

    Distance From:
    Glen Avon, CA - 5 km (3 miles) NNW (344 degrees)
    Fontana, CA - 6 km (4 miles) SW (218 degrees)
    Mira Loma, CA - 7 km (4 miles) NNE (13 degrees)
    Pedley, CA - 9 km (6 miles) NNW (346 degrees)
    Bloomington, CA - 10 km (6 miles) W (259 degrees)

    At 4:36pm PST we had a 3.3 that shook the house pretty good, since then, 9 tiny ones. Check the last few days since 5/26! Just non-stop. Never seen this before.

    https://ktla.com/2019/06/02/dozens-of-small-earthquakes-felt-in-glen-avon/

    Since Dr. Jones' response, there have been many more.
    --- Post Merged, Jun 2, 2019 ---
    Since posting this, just had another house rattler (~3.0 I guess) -- waiting for it to show up on Caltech's website. (It was a 2.6).
    --- Post Merged, Jun 2, 2019 ---
    Just had a 2.7. lol. Going to be an interesting night!
     
  2. Huntn, Jun 3, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2019

    Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

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    The Misty Mountains
    #3
    I’m no expert on earthquakes, but my understanding is that for a fault line , this is good instead of saving it up for a big one, yes?
     
  3. BigMcGuire thread starter Contributor

    BigMcGuire

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    #4
    This is what I’m thinking too. Just never seen or experienced it in one place like this before. Heh. I’ll take a few hundred tiny ones over a 5.0+.
     
  4. AronDraws macrumors 6502

    AronDraws

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    Location:
    Burbank, CA
    #5

    I'm in Burbank and I've been watching the alerts coming up. I don't believe any have been strong enough to be felt here yet, but it's close enough for me to wanna keep an eye on it. It's been something like over 400 in the area since mid/late May?? That's wild.
     
  5. BigMcGuire thread starter Contributor

    BigMcGuire

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  6. jkcerda macrumors 6502a

    jkcerda

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    Criminal Mexi Midget
    #7

    http://www.foxla.com/news/local-new...DcWhsVAokQZ-t8V9zPigvKd39G7xMxAc9SepBjsovQWtc
    when the world ends there will be no more taxes :p
    do we need an earth quake credit?
     
  7. cube macrumors P6

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    #8
    As long as Yellowstone does not explode...
     
  8. HDFan macrumors 65816

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    #10
    For that particular fault location yes. It can increases stress on other parts of that fault which did not slip. It can also create additional stress other adjacent faults.
     
  9. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

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    #11
    I was not thinking of it in those terms and it makes sense, the idea that the entire fault line need to be reducing stress gradually, not allowing it to build up.
     
  10. BigMcGuire thread starter Contributor

    BigMcGuire

    Joined:
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    Location:
    California
    #12
    Yes, tiny earthquakes are much better than none and a large one later. That said, I've been in CA since 89 and ... NEVER ever seen something like this - where you have 600-700 earthquakes in one area going off again and again and again for about a week -- if you look at the map, it kinda moved up and down in this one area. Never seen anything like it.

    The latest LA Times articles address this and mention that in 30+ years CA has not seen anything like this.

    Us Californians are a little jittery because we haven't had a good 5.0 earthquake in a while - usually indicates stress is building up.
     
  11. HDFan macrumors 65816

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    Jun 30, 2007
    #13
    I think it is PBS that has a great documentary on the San Andreas fault. It should move about 1" a year, but in many locations (such as San Francisco) it hasn't moved since 1906. So that's 113 years, meaning when it goes it will move 113 inches - close to 10 feet. They have a great arial shot of the fault in the central valley where it has slipped. You see a stream bed coming from the east. When it hits the fault it makes a 90 degree turn and heads north for a few hundred feet right over the fault. It then makes another 90 degree turn and leaves the fault line as it resumes its westernly flow.

    When the Spanish settlers came to the San Francisco area they settled around the lakes in the East Bay. So that's the center of many cities, where the hospitals, fire houses, city halls, etc. are located. We now know that the lakes were there because of the Hayward fault. Many of these buildings were build right over the fault. Most of the water and power lines go right over the fault. It it has the potential to be just as disastrous as the San Andreas.

    These are just two of the well known ones. There many others (hundreds?) which haven't been discovered yet.
     
  12. whooleytoo macrumors 604

    whooleytoo

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    Location:
    Cork, Ireland.
    #14
    Can't imagine earthquakes becoming a norm like that, never experienced any here.

    I assume all houses are built to withstand quakes to a reasonable degree? I'd imagine even a large number of small quakes could damage some buildings?
     
  13. BigMcGuire thread starter Contributor

    BigMcGuire

    Joined:
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    Location:
    California
    #15
    Yeah anything around a 5 can cause damage but depending on depth won’t do a ton of damage. A 6 definitely will cause damage. I’ve heard a lot of houses are built to withstand a 7 but in 1994 when we had the 6.4 I remember lots of things collapsing. Especially apartments.
     
  14. HDFan macrumors 65816

    Joined:
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    #16
    Sort of. Since wood (rather than brick) is the normal construction material for homes here this provides a measure of protection as wood flexes. In the Loma Prieta quake fatalities in Santa Cruz happened when a brick bookstore collapsed.

    In the Salinas area a lot of wood homes (built in the 20's I think) were destroyed as the homes weren't locked to their concrete foundations. They just fell off.

    So it depends on when it was constructed. After the Kyoto quake it was discovered that even steel buildings that I believe met Japans strict building codes were failing. Building codes tend to change after major quakes as vulnerabilities are exposed.

    The biggest problem is the cost. We have the building codes, but no one want to pay for the retrofits. Should I pay for a retrofit if the building itself may not even exist when the quake comes 100 years from now?

    https://www.nytimes.com/interactive...redness-usa-japan.html?searchResultPosition=2
     

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15 June 2, 2019