The Most Interesting Products We Saw at CES 2018

Discussion in 'MacRumors.com News Discussion' started by MacRumors, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. 69Mustang macrumors 603

    69Mustang

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    #51
    Inferior? Is it because you have some tangible info that leads you to believe it's inferior? I've never known or heard of any half baked tech from Synaptics. Or is it because it didn't come from Apple? That seems to be your only criteria. If it comes from Apple: good. If it comes from anyone else: bad.
     
  2. sinoka56 macrumors regular

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    #52
    Like how the Face ID can't even distinguish identical twins?
     
  3. Snoopy4 macrumors 6502a

    Snoopy4

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    #53
    Soon enough. That’s the product people have been waiting for. Scalable TV. My hunch is it will be available in 2.4:1 as well. That would be the chit. Expensive as hell today, easily over 100k. 10 years from now...I can see 25k for the 146”. Forget the theater if that becomes a reality.

    I think Sony or LG had a role up led screen. Also slick, but would probably flap in any breeze which would be annoying.
    --- Post Merged, Jan 12, 2018 ---
    Replacing a projector is king. At 146” you need to sit back 16’ for the recommended THX viewing distance. That’s one big ass screen.
     
  4. deanthedev Suspended

    deanthedev

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    #54
    That’s all you’ve got? A stupid irrelevant comment claiming I think it’s no good because it’s not from Apple? Pathetic.

    Synaptics system is optical based (Qualcomm is ultrasonic). Think for a minute about which system could accurately measure the depth of the ridges and valleys of a real finger vs a printed copy. That and the fact people who tried the Synaptics version talking about how hit & miss it was if your finger wasn’t poistioned just right. This doesn’t appear ready for prime-time (which is probably why Vivo is using it and not Samsung in their S9).
    --- Post Merged, Jan 12, 2018 ---
    Where did Apple claim it could?
     
  5. sinoka56, Jan 12, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2018

    sinoka56 macrumors regular

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    #55
    You said that under-screen FP scanners are inferior but FP are unique enough that it can distinguish identical twins / people that look alike for that matter ... unlike Face ID
     
  6. George Dawes macrumors 6502a

    George Dawes

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    #56
    g-d help us if apple bring out one of those robotic pets
     
  7. bjoswald macrumors member

    bjoswald

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    #57
    All the "ping pong robot" needs is some kind of propulsion system, a link to a satellite-based military defense network and a neural-net processor. Imagine the possibilities!
     
  8. 6803390 Suspended

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    #58
    Last few months I was advocating fingerprint under the display. Now, I am not too sure whether it is good...

    I tell you why:

    * Requires Oled screen - I prefer lcd due to the longevity
    * Screen protectors could be an issue - self explanatory

    I see why Apple does not want to include it - including security reasons.

    Having said that, I noticed that few people complained about that iPhone X has to be positioned in a certain way in order for Face ID to work. Perhaps include both biometrics?
     
  9. lbmdk1 macrumors newbie

    lbmdk1

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    #59
    Bigger TVs, useless robots and concepts scooters, which will never go into actual production = The same as last year
     
  10. jclardy macrumors 68040

    jclardy

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    #60
    I'd say it is inferior just from a usability perspective. Touch ID was great because you could easily feel the indention of the home button and click it as you are picking the phone up out of your pocket. With an all glass front and back, you are now "guessing" to where the button is, whether you are on the right side of the device and the precise position vertically and horizontally on the glass surface to unlock it. They would surely aid you with haptic feedback, but I'm not sure it would be enough to make it as smooth of an experience.

    After using Face ID though, I don't want to go back. Face ID makes the lock screen actually useful now because I don't have to tap a notification then authenticate, I am just already authenticated by looking at the notification in the first place.
     
  11. TheShadowKnows! macrumors 6502

    TheShadowKnows!

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    #61
    Sorry, dude. But the only thing you are exposing is your blind faith on all things Apple.

    There is a place for under-display fingerprint authentication, and Apple's Asian competitors will use it as a calling card, no doubt. Here are some reasons:
    1. no need for precise alignment of receptor to emitter with always-on detection
    2. reduced complexity and increased yields (see 1)
    3. improved mean-time-to-failure and extended battery life (see 1)
    4. lower end-user cost (see 1 thru 3)
    5. improved ergonomics with "touch anywhere" to authenticate (when the fingerprint is unblocked)
    6. improved aesthetics (one-continuous piece of glass -- no discontinuities)
    7. perfect display-to-size ratio (see 6)
    8. ...
    And, yes. Apple will never acquiesce to go back to a TouchId Mark III under the display. FaceId is their signature differentiator, going forward. That much we know given their public comments.

    But, I ask, if there is ever to be a SE Mark II (which I love), wouldn't it benefit from an under-the-display fingerprint sensor?
     
  12. rhoydotp macrumors 6502

    rhoydotp

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    #62
    Totally agree! I was impressed with the fast twitch moves by the robots yet still controlled. Really getting closer to a time where robots will be part of daily life.
     
  13. Chupa Chupa macrumors G5

    Chupa Chupa

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    #63
    Well, we don't know what The Wall costs. If it's as expensive as you suggest then there is no "average person" in the mix. It would only be for the very high income folks, the ones who buy the $25K projectors. Decidedly that is tiny market of a tiny market.

    But below that top of the line market there is a decent mid-range HT market. I'm not among the very high income folks. I don't live in a McMansion. I live in a TH. My HT AKA The Loft has standard 8ft ceilings. The wall my projector screen is on is 16 ft wide. My projector screen is 100 in. My current project cost me $5K -- 8 years ago. If I could get a 100in modular screen like The Wall for $5K I'd bite. No brainer b/c projectors are compromise.

    Single panel 90" flat screens are available for $3K. Seems Samsung could be competitive here since presumably cobbling several smaller flat screens into one should be less expensive than producing one large one. The only question is can they get all those panels to stay in sync with each other over time.
     
  14. Plutonius macrumors 604

    Plutonius

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    #64
    I think that instead of "most interesting" in the title, it should say "best way to waste money" :).
     
  15. X38 macrumors 6502

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    #65
    I thought FaceID sounded like a good idea, but after a couple months living with it, I'm starting to think in-screen TouchID would be a better solution. FaceID still fails to unlock often enough to be irritating and the inability to unlock without having the iPhone pointed at me and facing upright turns out to be a pretty serious nuisance. It's especially bad in situations such as meetings where I have my iPhone laying on a table and I need to discretely glance at something - with TouchID I could just leave the iPhone on the table, but with FaceID I have to pick it up, often rotate it, and point it at me, which is often rather disruptive for the meeting. It turns out having a way to discretely access information relevant to a meeting at my fingertips was one of those iPhone things that I'd long since taken for granted but used frequently. TouchID was much better in this scenario. Unless Apple can get FaceID to work with hemispherical coverage and any orientation, it would be better to either switch to in-screen TouchID or include both.
    --- Post Merged, Jan 13, 2018 ---
    Yes, after experience with FaceID, I agree including both would a big improvement.
     
  16. Supermacguy macrumors 6502

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    #66
    I'd love to actually have the TouchID sensor be on the screen. I really don't like FaceID, and despite ppl saying it's here to stay, I feel it's not an improvement on the human/phone interaction. As others have said, I'd really like Apple to have TouchID and FaceID both in a phone. You can have the best of both features, if you set it up properly. Something in the sys prefs like "always use touchID first if verified" or "require both touchID and faceID for purchases".
    --- Post Merged, Jan 13, 2018 ---
    The BEST piece of tech was surely the Aflac duck for kids with cancer.
     
  17. Chupa Chupa, Jan 13, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2018

    Chupa Chupa macrumors G5

    Chupa Chupa

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    #67
    1. CES is always a snooze fest. But it's not intended to be entertainment. It's a trade show. Once upon a time those of us outside the trade had to wait until the March issue of Popular Science or PCWorld or Sound and Vision magazine to find out what the new product announcements were. So it seemed more exciting. Now we get it real time plus we are a lot more jaded about tech now because products are announced year round now, not held until CES.

    2. I care very much about voice assistance. Apparently lots of others too because Echo was the big gift for the 2nd year in a row. I use Siri myself to manage parts of my home -- one of my door locks (August lock), my thermostat (Ecobee3), all of my lamps in the house (Hue + LIFX), and my chandelier (Leviton Homekit Dimmer). IMHO that is where Siri shines. Where it falters is that you have to have an iDevice to use it. I wish Apple would make or license something like the Dot. It would make Homekit so much better. Meanwhile, yes, I do envy all of the Alexa compatible devices.
     
  18. velocityg4 macrumors 68040

    velocityg4

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    #68
    It's hard to guess on the prices. In 2011 Toshiba introduced the Regza 55x3. A 55 inch 4K TV for $12,000. Which as far as I can find is the first consumer 4K TV in that size range.

    Now you can pick up a 55" 4KTV for about $400. Once manufacturing matures and some competitors enter the market. Prices of the panels can potentially plummet. Looking at lower end 4K TV prices. It seems like price has gotten to the point where most of the cost is shipping and materials. They must be insanely cheap to produce.

    I don't know many details about the wall. Estimates seem to show around a 9" diagonal module. The question becomes how cheap can they get those module? Once manufacturing matures.
     
  19. deanthedev Suspended

    deanthedev

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    #69
    Touch anywhere to authenticate? You do realize the sensor is not full screen, and is located in a specific location, right?

    Extended battery life? Where’s the data for this? Extended vs regular fingerprint or extended vs face recognition? Which face recognition (regular camera based or FaceID)? Extended by how much? 1 minute, 10 minutes, 100 minutes? What’s the current consumption of the Synaptic sensor system vs other systems?

    Sounds like you copied/pasted something without even understanding what any of it means. This reads like a bullet point list from a sales chart Synaptics uses to try and convince OEMs to use their system.
     
  20. TheShadowKnows! macrumors 6502

    TheShadowKnows!

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    #70
    LOL! So much bitterness. Did you get your Apple blossom hurt?

    "Notably, Kuo adds that the decision to boost battery capacity across the board stems from the TrueDepth camera system that Apple debuted on this year’s iPhone X. The TrueDepth camera system, which powers features like Face ID, will reportedly be used on all new iPhone models next year."
     
  21. cmaier macrumors G4

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    California
    #71
    The faa needs to approve it if you bring it on a plane.

    The FAA doesn’t allow large li-ion batteries on planes since they tend to explode. And scooters tend to have ****** batteries that explode (hence amazon banned sales of many, etc.)

    So what they’re saying is “ours won’t burn down your house.”
     
  22. SonicSoundVW macrumors regular

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    Michigan, USA
    #72
    Jibo is a piece of garbage. Its not surprising the LG version didn't perform, the Jibo didn't either. lol
     
  23. blkhawk105 macrumors newbie

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    Feb 22, 2016
    #73
    Often times in development you don’t need to actually pick up the phone, but you can’t load a new build to a locked device.
     
  24. FightTheFuture macrumors 6502a

    FightTheFuture

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    #74
    Were they wrong? iPhone X is selling quite well.

    This sounds a lot like complaints of Apple ditching ports.
     
  25. macs4nw macrumors 601

    macs4nw

    #75
    The 'Wall' is absolutely mind-blowing. I would love to actually experience the quality of a microLED screen that size firsthand. Patience I guess.

    Imho, as far as mimicking reality is concerned, there is so far no substitute for huge screen sizes (such as the spectacular and slightly curved IMAX screens), not even the at the time much touted 3D technology, since then all but dropped, which I found to have peculiar distortion artifacts, especially relative sizes between body parts e.g.

    As a table-tennis player and aficionado, I'm also very impressed by Omron's Forpheus ping pong robot and am wondering how well it can detect and counteract the trickiest and deadliest table-tennis force: spin in its many forms.
     

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