This blows... I'm conflicted right now.

Johnny Steps

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 29, 2011
432
187
My MacBook Pro 2011, which I invested a new SSD and 16Gb of RAM just crashed and nothing is booting up. I'm thinking it's the GPU since apparently there's been articles on it and my computer's symptoms are extremely similar to those. I'm going to Apple later today to see what they'll do.

However my folks kindly offered to buy me a new MacBook Pro. They told me that even if Apple can fix it, they know they'll charge me and don't want that since I'm in school and putting something a brand new GPU isn't worth it for something old.

But as I looked at the new Retina models, I noticed they're not user upgradable after purchase.

What should I do? I know I probably shouldn't be picky since my parents are generously offering to get me a new one, but I guess since I've been exposed to the speed of a solid state drive and RAM it's been nice.

Also they want to buy the new one at a store, so I think they only have default models right?
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
63,831
30,347
Boston
I'd take it into Apple and get an estimate of what the price will be to repair. If it is the GPU then it makes more sense to go with a rMBP over repair because it will cost you and it will only delay the failure in the future.

Basically before spending a lot of money, see if the repair will cost.
 

Johnny Steps

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 29, 2011
432
187
I'd take it into Apple and get an estimate of what the price will be to repair. If it is the GPU then it makes more sense to go with a rMBP over repair because it will cost you and it will only delay the failure in the future.

Basically before spending a lot of money, see if the repair will cost.
All right then. But, and I can't believe I'm saying this about Apple's products, why are their rMBP so... Weaker in specs? My 2011 is a quad core 15" and yet to get similar to what I have now I'd have to pay over $2000. There's not even a solid state drive option for the 13" rMBP with 8gb of RAM?

Maybe I'm missing something...
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
63,831
30,347
Boston
What do you mean not a solid state option for the 13" rMBP?

The rMBP has an SSD already. :confused:
 

yjchua95

macrumors 604
Apr 23, 2011
6,725
230
GVA, KUL, MEL (current), ZQN
All right then. But, and I can't believe I'm saying this about Apple's products, why are their rMBP so... Weaker in specs? My 2011 is a quad core 15" and yet to get similar to what I have now I'd have to pay over $2000. There's not even a solid state drive option for the 13" rMBP with 8gb of RAM?

Maybe I'm missing something...
All retina MBPs use SSDs (aka flash storage).
 

yjchua95

macrumors 604
Apr 23, 2011
6,725
230
GVA, KUL, MEL (current), ZQN
Wait I thought solid state drives were different from flash drives? I thought the rMBP was using a regular whatever rpm flash drive?
Flash and SSD are one and the same.

In fact, the ones used in the RMBPs are capable of exceeding 700MB/s.

----------

Wait I thought solid state drives were different from flash drives? I thought the rMBP was using a regular whatever rpm flash drive?
RPM drives are called HDDs at 5400/7200rpm.

Flash and SSDs are the same and the terms are used interchangeably.
 

Johnny Steps

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 29, 2011
432
187
Flash and SSD are one and the same.

In fact, the ones used in the RMBPs are capable of exceeding 700MB/s.

----------



RPM drives are called HDDs at 5400/7200rpm.

Flash and SSDs are the same and the terms are used interchangeably.
Ohhh! Okay then! Well I just learned something today! Thank you for that!
 

KUguardgrl13

macrumors 68020
May 16, 2013
2,485
109
Kansas, USA
Oh! Well.. Hm. I guess that's not so bad. I still find it funny I can't get 16gb.. But yeah okay, I suppose the change won't be so bad.
You can get 16gb in the 13" rMBP if you order online. For the midrange model (2.4ghz and 256gb SSD) it's an $80 difference once you add the education discount. It's normally $1499, and you can get it with 16gb of ram for $1579.

But consider your uses. Do you absolutely need more than 8gb? If you're doing things involving video or CAD software then maybe. If you're writing papers and watching Netflix, then 8gb should be plenty.
 

MCAsan

macrumors 601
Jul 9, 2012
4,524
410
Atlanta
The first generation rMBPs used SSDs with a SATA interface...like a spinning HD. But the latest generation uses SSDs with a PCI-e that is faster. So you will extremely fast "disk" read/write procedures with a new Macbook that uses an SSD. :D
 

Johnny Steps

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jun 29, 2011
432
187
You can get 16gb in the 13" rMBP if you order online. For the midrange model (2.4ghz and 256gb SSD) it's an $80 difference once you add the education discount. It's normally $1499, and you can get it with 16gb of ram for $1579.

But consider your uses. Do you absolutely need more than 8gb? If you're doing things involving video or CAD software then maybe. If you're writing papers and watching Netflix, then 8gb should be plenty.
Yeah.. Probably not. Netflix and papers and online homework is the most I use. I guess I want to feel like I'm future proofing my computer but technology doesn't work that way.
 

KUguardgrl13

macrumors 68020
May 16, 2013
2,485
109
Kansas, USA
Yeah.. Probably not. Netflix and papers and online homework is the most I use. I guess I want to feel like I'm future proofing my computer but technology doesn't work that way.
People on this forum are kind of split on the future proofing bit. I started college on 2009 with a MBP with 2gb of ram (barely enough back then). I decided to Max it out last year to 8gb to speed it up a bit and found I use about 4gb. Then my MBP really struggled in September, so I replaced it in October with a new rMBP also with 8gb. I hope to keep this Mac until 2016 at least, so I hope 8gb will be enough. The way I see it, ram expectations have doubled in 5 years. Now 4gb is barely enough and 8gb is average.
 

Zeov

macrumors 6502a
Apr 1, 2011
634
113
Odense
All right then. But, and I can't believe I'm saying this about Apple's products, why are their rMBP so... Weaker in specs? My 2011 is a quad core 15" and yet to get similar to what I have now I'd have to pay over $2000. There's not even a solid state drive option for the 13" rMBP with 8gb of RAM?

Maybe I'm missing something...
yes, you're missing something.

----------

All right then. But, and I can't believe I'm saying this about Apple's products, why are their rMBP so... Weaker in specs? My 2011 is a quad core 15" and yet to get similar to what I have now I'd have to pay over $2000. There's not even a solid state drive option for the 13" rMBP with 8gb of RAM?

Maybe I'm missing something...
yes, you're missing something.

all retina macbooks use SSD.
 

sb in ak

macrumors newbie
Apr 15, 2014
19
0
Homer, Alaska
I'd definitely wait for an repair estimate for the 2011 Macbook before buying a new model. For your uses, the 2011 is still plenty powerful. Hell, I can do those things on my 2009 Macbook.

I am personally not a fan of the sealed design of the rMBP models. I see them as larger Macbook Air models. They're pretty and fast but not fitting of the "pro" designation due to loss of ports, optical drive, and no upgradability (or more realistically, fixability). I had a Ram module fail on my 2009 MB last year and I was able to easily replace it--$30 DIY fix. Personally, I'd grab the base mid-2012 non retina on the refurb store. You can still upgrade the Ram and you can put the SSD you just purchased in there, assuming the 2011 isn't worth fixing.
 

dmccloud

macrumors 6502a
Sep 7, 2009
991
14
Anchorage, AK
My MacBook Pro 2011, which I invested a new SSD and 16Gb of RAM just crashed and nothing is booting up. I'm thinking it's the GPU since apparently there's been articles on it and my computer's symptoms are extremely similar to those. I'm going to Apple later today to see what they'll do.

However my folks kindly offered to buy me a new MacBook Pro. They told me that even if Apple can fix it, they know they'll charge me and don't want that since I'm in school and putting something a brand new GPU isn't worth it for something old.

But as I looked at the new Retina models, I noticed they're not user upgradable after purchase.

What should I do? I know I probably shouldn't be picky since my parents are generously offering to get me a new one, but I guess since I've been exposed to the speed of a solid state drive and RAM it's been nice.

Also they want to buy the new one at a store, so I think they only have default models right?
I bought mine at the Apple Store (specs in sig), even though the website claimed it was only available online. Best thing to do is ask which models they have in stock. Apple tends to ship the most common configurations to the stores, even if it's not a "stock" option on the website itself.

If you're just using it for internet/email/schoolwork, then you could probably go with a smaller SSD and less RAM than I'm running, but that depends on how you will be using the machine.
 

eneisch

macrumors 6502a
Jul 11, 2008
638
109
I bought mine at the Apple Store (specs in sig), even though the website claimed it was only available online. Best thing to do is ask which models they have in stock. Apple tends to ship the most common configurations to the stores, even if it's not a "stock" option on the website itself.
+1 on this. Some Apple stores seem to have additional configurations in stock but you have to ask for them. I know someone who recently got a 13" Macbook Air from a NYC Apple store with 8GB of RAM and a 512GB SSD which are usually build to order (BTO) options.
 

Hieveryone

macrumors 601
Apr 11, 2014
4,133
1,464
USA
My MacBook Pro 2011, which I invested a new SSD and 16Gb of RAM just crashed and nothing is booting up. I'm thinking it's the GPU since apparently there's been articles on it and my computer's symptoms are extremely similar to those. I'm going to Apple later today to see what they'll do.

However my folks kindly offered to buy me a new MacBook Pro. They told me that even if Apple can fix it, they know they'll charge me and don't want that since I'm in school and putting something a brand new GPU isn't worth it for something old.

But as I looked at the new Retina models, I noticed they're not user upgradable after purchase.

What should I do? I know I probably shouldn't be picky since my parents are generously offering to get me a new one, but I guess since I've been exposed to the speed of a solid state drive and RAM it's been nice.

Also they want to buy the new one at a store, so I think they only have default models right?
It seems to me like you want a notebook with really good specs so I'd consider the 15" 2.3GHz quad core with 16 GB ram and a 512GB SSD.

I'm not sure your budget but don't forget to check the refurbished store or the education discount!

Personally, I wanted the 2.6GHz quad core, 16GB ram, 1 TB SDD, 15 inch retina but it was overkill for my needs and super expensive. Although, it sure would've been nice!
 

MCAsan

macrumors 601
Jul 9, 2012
4,524
410
Atlanta
The ed discount on a top of the line 15: rMBP is $200. The same configuration refurbed is $500 off....with warranty and eligible for Apple Care.

I don't think you can get ed discount on refurbed units....but it might be worth asking. ;)
 

bobcan

macrumors 6502a
Jan 8, 2007
680
5
Sunny but Cold.. Canada
The ed discount on a top of the line 15: rMBP is $200. The same configuration refurbed is $500 off....with warranty and eligible for Apple Care.

I don't think you can get ed discount on refurbed units....but it might be worth asking. ;)
Yes, the Refurbs are likely 'best bang for buck' if you find one config'd as you would like.. and as you say, with same Warranty and as Applecare eligible as any other.. and NO, there is not a Education Discount on them, online order at the price you see.. Stock changes often hourly, so keep looking!! :apple:

http://store.apple.com/us/browse/home/specialdeals/mac/macbook_pro
 

thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
6,667
1,738
Oh! Well.. Hm. I guess that's not so bad. I still find it funny I can't get 16gb.. But yeah okay, I suppose the change won't be so bad.
You can get 16GB if you order it online as a configure to order option. It's $200, which isn't that much more than you would pay aftermarket at current ram prices. It varies from month to month. Two months ago it was around $180. Now it's $160 from crucial. At one point it was only around $80. The cheaper brands tend to have a higher rate of bad sticks.

Don't pay too much attention to cpu clock speeds. Their interpretation varies somewhat when comparing different generations or cpu classes. They have gone more toward integrated graphics. The rmbp graphics won't be a step up, but that only matters if you're really using them. You can see if Apple will do anything. It's becoming an issue, so I'm surprised no repair program was enacted.
 

Justinhub2003

macrumors regular
Jul 17, 2012
137
0
Cincinnati Oh
I'd definitely wait for an repair estimate for the 2011 Macbook before buying a new model. For your uses, the 2011 is still plenty powerful. Hell, I can do those things on my 2009 Macbook.

I am personally not a fan of the sealed design of the rMBP models. I see them as larger Macbook Air models. They're pretty and fast but not fitting of the "pro" designation due to loss of ports, optical drive, and no upgradability (or more realistically, fixability). I had a Ram module fail on my 2009 MB last year and I was able to easily replace it--$30 DIY fix. Personally, I'd grab the base mid-2012 non retina on the refurb store. You can still upgrade the Ram and you can put the SSD you just purchased in there, assuming the 2011 isn't worth fixing.
Who the heck needs an optical drive though?

I guess I don't get how making a laptop quad core, super thin, lasting 9 hours, with the fastest SSD interface available in a laptop, a decent GPU and an outright beautiful screen is not a " Pro " machine. the 15" MBPr also weighs the same a 13" Classic MBP which is crazy.

Upgradeability is not requirement for "pro". I have all my old ports too just I only connect the adapter when I need it and I don't have to deal with a thicker laptop for things I use 5% of the time.
 

simon48

macrumors 65816
Sep 1, 2010
1,315
88
I'd definitely wait for an repair estimate for the 2011 Macbook before buying a new model. For your uses, the 2011 is still plenty powerful. Hell, I can do those things on my 2009 Macbook.

I am personally not a fan of the sealed design of the rMBP models. I see them as larger Macbook Air models. They're pretty and fast but not fitting of the "pro" designation due to loss of ports, optical drive, and no upgradability (or more realistically, fixability). I had a Ram module fail on my 2009 MB last year and I was able to easily replace it--$30 DIY fix. Personally, I'd grab the base mid-2012 non retina on the refurb store. You can still upgrade the Ram and you can put the SSD you just purchased in there, assuming the 2011 isn't worth fixing.
If you're talking about a "pro" laptop not having enough ports how about the fact that it has 3 display ports. That's huge and two of them are Thunderbolts which can be chained and be used for a lot of other ports. Now that's fixability.
 

sb in ak

macrumors newbie
Apr 15, 2014
19
0
Homer, Alaska
I still use the optical drive for DVDs (I often live in places where the internet is sketchy and it allows me to use Netflix). And I know the argument is that you can get external drives cheap, but that also adds to the number of peripherals I have to haul around. Plus, I figure that I can always swap out the DVD drive once it becomes truly archaic and replace it with a SSD, even if that connection is a little slower. Again, less peripherals to haul around. Remember, all of these adapters and peripherals add to the weight of the unit and makes it less cohesive. Though one could make the argument that the use of peripherals instead of everything sitting inside give you options to travel as light or heavy as you want.

Not necessarily trying to convince the OP. Just stating why I'm not ready to go to the rMBP yet.

PS, I also don't need a lecture on what "pros" do or don't need. We all have specific needs. It's fine if the rMBP works for you. It might not work for me as well. I do think that there is a loss here as Apple is offering fewer options to their customer base.