This may help with some of the FaceID fears

jsmith189

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Original poster
Jan 12, 2014
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Go to 4:40. You can see him using FaceID in a number of different ways and speeds.


Good to see that you can swipe up on the lock screen right away, even if FaceID hasn’t activated yet. So in theory you could swipe up while getting the phone out of your pocket, and then when you’re looking it would activate right away because you’ve already initiated the swipe unlock. Much like people do now (unlock with TouchID as they’re raising the phone then start using when they can see it).

I’m sure people will still complain, but I’ve seen a few people worry about “how quickly” they’ll be able to get in, and it seems “pretty quick” would be the answer.
 

dojoman

macrumors 68000
Apr 8, 2010
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That will save a lot time instead of face unlock then swipe up. I hope Apple will update new firmware where it will just go straight to homescreen just like the option in TouchID.
 

profets

macrumors 601
Mar 18, 2009
4,442
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That will save a lot time instead of face unlock then swipe up. I hope Apple will update new firmware where it will just go straight to homescreen just like the option in TouchID.
I wish one of these youtubers who had an initial hands on would have checked the accessibility settings to see if there’s a similar option for Face ID.
 

LiemTa

macrumors 6502
Jun 2, 2014
331
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That will save a lot time instead of face unlock then swipe up. I hope Apple will update new firmware where it will just go straight to homescreen just like the option in TouchID.
Craig already talked about this. Apple already tried this and found you would not be able to read your notifications if the phone just unlocked at the glance.
 

KingslayerG5

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Oct 16, 2017
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NSA concerns more than speed/convenience concerns for me.

The company who did Face ID did Microsoft Kinect. Xbox haters joke that Kinect really is CCTV for NSA.

I probably will give Face ID a one-week trial but likely go back to passcode once paranoia starts to creep in.

As they mentioned in articles regarding privacy, the key to our privacy is written all over our face.
 
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WilliamG

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Mar 29, 2008
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Interesting if you attempt to unlock the phone too fast you can see the words “Face ID” on the screen. Still very fast. Not as fast as Touch ID, but still fast enough.
 
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Oridus

macrumors 65816
Oct 8, 2012
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NSA concerns more than speed/convenience concerns for me.

The company who did Face ID did Microsoft Kinect. Xbox haters joke that Kinect really is CCTV for NSA.

I probably will give Face ID a one-week trial but likely go back to passcode once paranoia starts to creep in.

As they mentioned in articles regarding privacy, the key to our privacy is written all over our face.
And the concerns are all of a sudden more relevant because Apple has done it. When Android started doing facial unlock (albeit with a much less secure technology), I didn't see nearly as much outrage in regards to privacy as I've seen over the net for FaceID.
 

nia820

macrumors 68020
Jun 27, 2011
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NSA concerns more than speed/convenience concerns for me.

The company who did Face ID did Microsoft Kinect. Xbox haters joke that Kinect really is CCTV for NSA.

I probably will give Face ID a one-week trial but likely go back to passcode once paranoia starts to creep in.

As they mentioned in articles regarding privacy, the key to our privacy is written all over our face.
If you think government doesn't have a scan of your face already then you're mistaken.

Government doesn't need face ID to get a scan of your face.
 
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Knowimagination

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Apr 6, 2010
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NSA concerns more than speed/convenience concerns for me.

The company who did Face ID did Microsoft Kinect. Xbox haters joke that Kinect really is CCTV for NSA.

I probably will give Face ID a one-week trial but likely go back to passcode once paranoia starts to creep in.

As they mentioned in articles regarding privacy, the key to our privacy is written all over our face.
I wish this wasn't a serious reply, but unfortunately I think that it is.

The NSA absolutely will not have any access to Face ID information.
 

penajmz

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Sep 11, 2008
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And the concerns are all of a sudden more relevant because Apple has done it. When Android started doing facial unlock (albeit with a much less secure technology), I didn't see nearly as much outrage in regards to privacy as I've seen over the net for FaceID.
This.
 

Oridus

macrumors 65816
Oct 8, 2012
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If you think government doesn't have a scan of your face already then you're mistaken.

Government doesn't need face ID to get a scan of your face.
It's funny because a great majority of people in the USA (or other industrialized countries who use similar identification systems), 18 and older (and in some situations, younger), have at least one of the following:

  • Drivers License
  • Occupational License
  • Work ID
  • Passport
  • Military ID
  • Immigration ID
  • Mugshot
  • Photo or video of their likeness captured on security systems of a government facility such as the DMV, social security administration video
List goes on and on.

But yet, lets get worried over our phones having a facial unlock system designed a company already proven to keep the privacy and security of the contents of the devices it creates one of it's top priorities, if not top priority. The same company that was in the news for not bypassing the lock of an iPhone.
[doublepost=1509384293][/doublepost]
Does anyone know if you can completely disable Face ID like you can Touch ID and passcode, so that you can just swipe to open?
Of course you can. Simply don't set up FaceID or add a passcode.
 
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KingslayerG5

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Oct 16, 2017
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https://tech.co/new-iphone-x-face-id-invasion-privacy-2017-10/amp

“Because Face ID is attention-based, much like voice recognition systems, this means some aspect of the technology has to always be on. Some are creeped out by the idea of facial recognition system potentially scanning everything it sees, which seems like a legitimate concern.

“The increasing usage of biometrics for consumer security will likely reignite the Apple vs. FBI debate. Some also fear that easy-to-use biometric systems, like Face ID, might wind up being used against consumers if they’re put into situations where they’re unable to act quickly enough to disable Face ID and are compelled to unlock their phone against their will.”

“Although Apple says it’s worked with Hollywood makeup and design artists to tests its systems against spoofed faces, it’s getting frighteningly easier to create facial molds and models. For example, in 2013, artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg created an art exhibit using residual DNA from leftover hair and other artifacts to 3D print the faces of strangers. Her exhibit was created to demonstrate the amount of information we tend to leave behind and how we’ll need to carefully guard it from the surveillance systems of the future. With 3D printing and DNA phenotyping becoming more common, the long-term viability of facial recognition as a security measure is at the very least questionable.”

Worse, Face ID has a single point of failure, your face. Should you lose to mathematical model that the tech relies on to a hack, you can’t exactly change your face like you can a password.

“Because so many of the concerns surrounding Face ID are speculative, it’s extremely difficult to say. While it’s likely that individuals using Face ID will make their devices more secure, in a broader sense, an argument could be made that the privacy implications of introducing this technology for society as a whole are currently unknown.”



Imagine if you are drunk or stoned. The nosy, jealous gf is ready to flash your phone to unlock it with just a gaze? Nah. Passcode it is.
 

andcool69

macrumors member
Feb 21, 2011
58
37
It's funny because a great majority of people in the USA (or other industrialized countries who use similar identification systems), 18 and older (and in some situations, younger), have at least one of the following:

  • Drivers License
  • Occupational License
  • Work ID
  • Passport
  • Military ID
  • Immigration ID
  • Mugshot
  • Photo or video of their likeness captured on security systems of a government facility such as the DMV, social security administration video
List goes on and on.

But yet, lets get worried over our phones having a facial unlock system designed a company already proven to keep the privacy and security of the contents of the devices it creates one of it's top priorities, if not top priority. The same company that was in the news for not bypassing the lock of an iPhone.
[doublepost=1509384293][/doublepost]

Of course you can. Simply don't set up FaceID or add a passcode.

Yes to all of this. They have it even if you think they don't. Also, I work for the government... so yea they have everything about me on file somewhere. Doesn't concern me one bit!
 

Renho

macrumors 68000
Sep 15, 2014
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SR, CA
Well if you anybody doesn’t like FaceId then just use passcode. There, problem and concerns gone..
 

deany

macrumors 68030
Sep 16, 2012
2,874
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North Wales
Go to 4:40. You can see him using FaceID in a number of different ways and speeds.


Good to see that you can swipe up on the lock screen right away, even if FaceID hasn’t activated yet. So in theory you could swipe up while getting the phone out of your pocket, and then when you’re looking it would activate right away because you’ve already initiated the swipe unlock. Much like people do now (unlock with TouchID as they’re raising the phone then start using when they can see it).

I’m sure people will still complain, but I’ve seen a few people worry about “how quickly” they’ll be able to get in, and it seems “pretty quick” would be the answer.
What a wonderful invention, well worth the $999 to $1150 price tag.;)
 
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dojoman

macrumors 68000
Apr 8, 2010
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Where is this option now and what is it called?
General->Accessibility->Home Button->Rest Finger to Open toggle

One of the reviewers said it does go straight to home screen in certain situation, if you left off the phone and it autolocks the next time you unlock with FaceID it will go straight to home screen.
 

LarryJoe33

macrumors 68000
Jul 17, 2017
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Boston
General->Accessibility->Home Button->Rest Finger to Open toggle

One of the reviewers said it does go straight to home screen in certain situation, if you left off the phone and it autolocks the next time you unlock with FaceID it will go straight to home screen.
Thanks, that is what I thought. I use this, but I thought the only difference was that I did not have to press the home button. What are you guys thinking for Face ID, an option like this would automatically unlock the phone when you look at it (with no swipe)? I guess the difference between the two is that even with this option with Touch ID, you still have to psychically touch the phone. There still should be a need to touch the phone with FID
 
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