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Thoughts on MacBook Pro retina 18 months later

Hieveryone

macrumors 603
Original poster
Apr 11, 2014
5,274
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USA
This is primarily for the members on here who come on and can't decide whether or not to get a MacBook.

Just as a preface, I own a late 2013 2.6/8/256 13" MBPr. I was coming from an HP laptop and this was my first Mac.

Pros:

It's built well. Everything is high end. A notebook is more than just processor ram and storage. It's also trackpad, speakers, screen, and keyboard. I would have to say the MBPr is premium in every one of those ways.

The second thing about it is that "it just works." That basically means it does what I want it do when I want to do it every single time and there are no hiccups. Even basic things like turning it off are as simple as turning it off. With Windows there were sometimes 30 minute long updates before turning off.

If you own an iPad or an iPhone, you can relate to the above statement of "it just works." You never have to worry about maintenance. It never gets starts to lag, starts to overheat, or causes trouble in any way.

All the other pros are expected given I paid $1585 total, such as being lightning fast, etc.

Cons:

The price. It's a darn expensive item. Think about this: If your average laptop can run for 5 years, and you can buy 4 $400 dollar Windows laptops for the price of 1 $1600 MacBook, that's 20 years worth of computers. Literally.

___________________________________________________________________________________

Should you buy one?

It boils down to 1 thing- can you really afford it? Don't take a loan and pay interest to pay for this. Don't use your student debt to pay for one. If you get $2,000 a month in hand, don't spend 1 months earnings on a computer. You're better off getting a windows and saving your money for better things (such as retirement).

But if you make a comfortable income, have extra cash, very little debt, etc. it's a good choice. I don't think you would be disappointed. I certainly am not.

That's my opinion.
 
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Tenashus1

macrumors 6502
Jul 27, 2011
384
84
This is primarily for the members on here who come on and can't decide whether or not to get a MacBook.

Just as a preface, I own a late 2013 2.6/8/256 13" MBPr. I was coming from an HP laptop and this was my first Mac.

Pros:

It's built well. Everything is high end. A notebook is more than just processor ram and storage. It's also trackpad, speakers, screen, and keyboard. I would have to say the MBPr is premium in every one of those ways.

The second thing about it is that "it just works." That basically means it does what I want it do when I want to do it every single time and there are no hiccups. Even basic things like turning it off are as simple as turning it off. With Windows there were sometimes 30 minute long updates before turning off.

If you own an iPad or an iPhone, you can relate to the above statement of "it just works." You never have to worry about maintenance. It never gets starts to lag, starts to overheat, or causes trouble in any way.

All the other pros are expected given I paid $1585 total, such as being lightning fast, etc.

Cons:

The price. It's a darn expensive item. Think about this: If your average laptop can run for 5 years, and you can buy 4 $400 dollar Windows laptops for the price of 1 $1600 MacBook, that's 20 years worth of computers. Literally.

___________________________________________________________________________________

Should you buy one?

It boils down to 1 thing- can you really afford it? Don't take a loan and pay interest to pay for this. Don't use your student debt to pay for one. If you get $2,000 a month in hand, don't spend 1 months earnings on a computer. You're better off getting a windows and saving your money for better things (such as retirement).

But if you make a comfortable income, have extra cash, very little debt, etc. it's a good choice. I don't think you would be disappointed. I certainly am not.

That's my opinion.

Enjoying my first week with my rMBP. What a screen difference having come from a trusty, 2012 cMBP. Would have been nice if the price were lower but, it's an Apple.
 
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Micky Do

macrumors 68020
Aug 31, 2012
2,008
2,750
a South Pacific island
Should you buy one?

It boils down to 1 thing- can you really afford it? Don't take a loan and pay interest to pay for this. Don't use your student debt to pay for one. If you get $2,000 a month in hand, don't spend 1 months earnings on a computer. You're better off getting a windows and saving your money for better things (such as retirement).

But if you make a comfortable income, have extra cash, very little debt, etc. it's a good choice. I don't think you would be disappointed. I certainly am not.

That's my opinion.

So, a status symbol for the patrician born, not low rent plebs, in your opinion?
 
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maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
67,156
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Boston
The price. It's a darn expensive item. Think about this: If your average laptop can run for 5 years, and you can buy 4 $400 dollar Windows laptops for the price of 1 $1600 MacBook, that's 20 years worth of computers.
If you don't find value in the product, then it behooves you not to buy. In the case of the rMBP it is expensive, there's no denying that. You mentioned it yourself, its well designed, well made and high end. You cannot purchase a high end product for 400 dollar.s With that said if you do not find the value in the MBP at its price point, its silly to buy when when a less expensive windows computer would make do
 
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Dark Void

macrumors 68030
Jun 1, 2011
2,614
478
Interesting that you base most of it on price rather than experiences with it. I doubt you can get 20 years of computing out of 4 separate Windows notebooks at the cost of one MacBook. If you want a Windows laptop that will hold up to the test of time, you're going to be paying a price that is nearing the cost of a MacBook.

You're not just paying for hardware though which confuses most people who instantly bash Apple notebooks for their price without ever having used a Mac.
 
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matt2053

macrumors 6502a
Jul 8, 2012
549
101
After 2~3 logic board replacements, amirite?

I'm just going off what I've experienced in my own bubble of acquaintances, which is that many a 2007 or 2009 or 2010 MacBook Pro are still out there going strong.
 
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Hieveryone

macrumors 603
Original poster
Apr 11, 2014
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USA
What I'm saying is that the basic function of a computer for most people will be similar. Email, Word, internet browsing, etc etc.

A Windows will do that just fine. A Mac will do that better.

If you can afford a Mac, then it might be worth it, but if you're having to take a loan etc then just get a PC and save your money for more important things.

A Honda will take you from point A to B just fine. A Mercedes will do it better.

If you can afford the Benz, it might be worth it. If not, Honda is great.
 
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zettabyte

macrumors regular
Jun 6, 2015
105
19
Interesting that you base most of it on price rather than experiences with it. I doubt you can get 20 years of computing out of 4 separate Windows notebooks at the cost of one MacBook. If you want a Windows laptop that will hold up to the test of time, you're going to be paying a price that is nearing the cost of a MacBook.

You're not just paying for hardware though which confuses most people who instantly bash Apple notebooks for their price without ever having used a Mac.

I agree Dark Void. Who in their right mind would want only 4 computers, let alone Windows, in the span of 20 years? That's just silly. This reminds me of penny 'pinchers' who split a 2-ply toilet paper to save money, which is complete non-sense, because it does not make sense logically. Like even thinking of the idea of owning 4 Windows PC's all within 20 years. Wow...

To those penny 'pinchers' here...This is a MAC forum folks and it'd be expected that the owners of MAC's are not counting pennies and expressing their, "what if's, you could, it'd be better, more economical etc..." opinions here. I mean come on...have a little respect and class for the premium brand and to those who are a part of this community. This "ain't" wally world folks.

If you were to walk into a private Yacht club or heck even a high end Automobile forum...the price of gas is not even a topic of discussion. Get the point? - This has nothing to do with brand snobbishness, it's just the nature of staying within the line of ethics and sharing in the same interest for something and being productive with the movement. If buyers remorse is an issue, go return it and be done with it.

This is an Apple forum. Let's have a little class and talk about everything MAC, expect the price point. (Specifically in the sense of, "oh you could get a $400 this and that than paying $1000+ for a Mac.." If you can afford it great, if you can't oh well. Save up and look forward to buying a premium product when you can. I'll cheer you on.

Please people...lets just stop the poor-mans mentality talk here...

Nonetheless, thanks OP for sharing. Glad you're enjoying it...
 
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aberrero

macrumors 6502a
Jan 12, 2010
838
238
I took out a loan to buy my rMBP on launch day. No regrets. It's still going strong, pretty much indistinguishable from a 2015 model.

That said, don't buy an rMBP today. The current models are going to be obsolete in a year. You are much better off getting an older model on ebay for less than half the price of a new one, and it will give you 90% of the performance. Apple has really let the MBP go over the years. It was amazing when it came out - absolutely incredible for its time- but they haven't really moved it forward at all in the past 3 years.
 
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JackieInCo

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Jul 18, 2013
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I took out a loan to buy my rMBP on launch day. No regrets. It's still going strong, pretty much indistinguishable from a 2015 model.

That said, don't buy an rMBP today. The current models are going to be obsolete in a year. You are much better off getting an older model on ebay for less than half the price of a new one, and it will give you 90% of the performance. Apple has really let the MBP go over the years. It was amazing when it came out - absolutely incredible for its time- but they haven't really moved it forward at all in the past 3 years.

I paid cash for my 15" Retina Pro. I had no problem buying the latest MBP because I hadn't owned one since 2010. I was using a 2010 white MB and a 2008 black MB so this is a HUGE upgrade for me, an amazing computer.
 
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iSheep5S

macrumors 6502a
Jun 4, 2013
568
275
Scotland
I'm not sure where the 'only rich people can afford Mac's' comes from because its the choice of unemployed people. ;)

Also fighting the Mac choice.

Assuming your Mac doesn't break you will (at least in the UK) get around 50% back after around 4 years.

To put this into perspective.

I got a £550 Samsung Windows laptop and after just 2 years! I was lucky to get £150 and it, like all my tech was minted.

On the flip side, when i crossed over to Mac i still missed Windows for gaming. So i took advantage of the bad resale prices and bagged one nearly new AMD equipped HP.
 
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nStyle

macrumors 65816
Dec 6, 2009
1,160
286
OP has at least one good thought: if you flat out can't afford it and need a computer, buy the cheapest thing you can get away with and invest the difference once you make it up.

I do not think the 13" rMBP is expensive for what it is (there's no comparable Windows laptop for cheaper with better features). I think a $499 iPad is expensive - for what it is.

zettabyte said:
Like even thinking of the idea of owning 4 Windows PC's all within 20 years. Wow...

Sorry but this does come off a bit pretentious. There's nothing unfeasible about that. Not everyone wants to spend money just because...There are plenty of people out there who buy for their needs. So, theoretically, I can easily see someone buying a cheap Windows PC every 5 years. I can see even more easily someone only needing a new Mac every 5-7 years.
 
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Dark Void

macrumors 68030
Jun 1, 2011
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478
I agree Dark Void. Who in their right mind would want only 4 computers, let alone Windows, in the span of 20 years? That's just silly. This reminds me of penny 'pinchers' who split a 2-ply toilet paper to save money, which is complete non-sense, because it does not make sense logically. Like even thinking of the idea of owning 4 Windows PC's all within 20 years. Wow...

Not entirely what I am saying (or at all). I don't mind a good Windows laptop, but to suggest that you can essentially divide the price of a Mac by 4 and say that four "typical Windows notebooks" individually equal to that divided price will last 5 years each is quite a stretch and a general, uninformed statement. I've had Windows notebooks and netbooks last years, but I found it to be quite a stretch, especially with no information given other than a vague understanding of what a "Windows laptop" (whatever that means specifically) could cost.

Plus, the statement is limiting in its own right. Sure, I can go get a Tobisha Satellite or Acer E Series right now for $299-$399 and use it for the next X number of years - but what if I needed or just preferred OS X? What's the battery life on it? What's the size and weight of it? How much RAM does it come with? Do I have to preform aftermarket upgrades for the general speed to be about the same for everyday tasks? Etc etc.

I have a 4 and a half year old MacBook Pro that uses a third party SSD and has had its RAM doubled (so it's about a $1400 purchase total over the years, compared to the OP's $1600 figure) and even that many years later it still receives double the battery life that an entry level Windows notebook would advertise, and it offers a better laptop experience because it doesn't cut corners on cheap keyboards or trackpad assemblies, and honestly the speakers are still better than what seems to be shipping in a "typical" notebook 5 years later. It boots in seconds and I don't have to deal with the crawling of an aged mechanical drive that I would have to if I was almost done with "my first of four $400 notebooks in a 20 year span."

So yeah, I'm elaborating quite a bit but all I am trying to say is that it's quite an ignorant statement, mostly because it's extremely general and offers nothing other than simple mathematics and non-specified ideas. You don't just go by price or specs when purchasing or using a computer.
 
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campyguy

macrumors 68040
Mar 21, 2014
3,413
953
Two additional points to this thread. I've owned 4 Mercedes vehicles, including a GL450 with the Off-Road Package (12" of ground clearance!) - I'm 6'7" and I don't even fit in Hondas. I also don't hear the road noise like you would in a Honda.

I run a small business, and we have both Macs and PCs. "$400 PCs" are generally crap that will not last past one fiscal year - the time and effort needed to keep one running or replaced adds several hundred dollars) that I need to pay someone to install and retrain) to that "cheap" cost.

And, I need scheduling software. We use Merlin, from a German company. A Merlin license costs me $350. A MS Project "Pro" CAL costs me $995. They do the same thing.

And, if a Mac has issues, I use my AppleCare warranty to get a Mac fixed or replaced in short order, often in the same day. My PCs? Hah!!!! Get an RMA, ship the PC to wherever (dealing with traffic is a PITA too!), then deal with the inevitable "we can't find anything wrong with your PC, "have you installed Windows/drivers/hardware properly" spiel - then wait for it to be shipped back to me.... Screw that.

I run Windows 7 or 8.1 in a Parallels VM on my Mac - it's as fast as most of my PCs. BTW, OS X is UNIX - supremely more powerful than any Windows OS I've used, and I started with 2.0 when I was working for Boeing. Two more toxic words with Windows keeps me from investing any more money in Windows that I have to - "The Registry". :mad:

Cheers!
 
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A.Goldberg

macrumors 68020
Jan 31, 2015
2,396
9,036
Boston
Should you buy one?

It boils down to 1 thing- can you really afford it? Don't take a loan and pay interest to pay for this. Don't use your student debt to pay for one. If you get $2,000 a month in hand, don't spend 1 months earnings on a computer. You're better off getting a windows and saving your money for better things (such as retirement).

But if you make a comfortable income, have extra cash, very little debt, etc. it's a good choice. I don't think you would be disappointed. I certainly am not.
So here we have it, in this awkward, patronizing, pseudo-financial advice column, written by the alleged "Wolf of Wall Street" :rolleyes:, we have a glimmer of financial advice. Don't buy things you cannot afford. Don't finance a nonessential, rapidly depreciating asset (or in the case of a PC more of a liability ;) ). Wow, this is revolutionary stuff from the grand maven himself! I humbly bow in gratitude for gracing me with your divine wisdom.

I think the key word here is afford, which is a relative term. If someone can't afford to buy their MacBook Pro in cash, but require it for their business (i.e. graphic design), then it is a necessity. Can you afford not to own it? Without it you cannot work. Financing the $1600 computer and taking the hit on interest ultimately pays off because it allows them to work and earn money. It's called investment, a field in which you supposedly work.

Every purchase involves a cost-benefit analysis at some level. Whether it's a box of cereal or a house. In reality, every conscious decision we make is a cost-benefit analysis. Should I buy a $2000 computer? Should I walk back up the 3 flights stairs to get the phone charger I forgot,? No, I'm too tired or Yes, I need it so my battery doesn't die and no one can call me. Spending appropriately and maximizing saving/investing general theme of being a financially responsible adult. The ideas you're professing here are really quite obvious. For the acclaimed investor that you are, this would be known as "stating the obvious". True, many people make terrible financial decisions, but that is a matter of desire over practicality, not a lack of education.

I think part of equation you're missing is, do you actually need it. It's not just about affording. I can afford a $2,000 computer, sure. But I already have a year or-so old MacBook Pro, a Mac Pro, a ThinkPad, and a few oldies hanging around. I think I'm set. Do you need to buy a computer right now. Do you really need the features of an Apple, or are the functions of the low-end PC good enough? Does the performance of the MBA with the lower price tag satisfy your needs? etc. The "Pros" of the MBP you listed are much the same as the MBA.

The price. It's a darn expensive item. Think about this: If your average laptop can run for 5 years, and you can buy 4 $400 dollar Windows laptops for the price of 1 $1600 MacBook, that's 20 years worth of computers. Literally.
But you're comparing apples and oranges here. A $1600 MacBook is not a $400 PC laptop. They do not have the same hardware, same software, same compatibilities, same reliability, same resale value, same customer service, or what would be most important in your mind, snob appeal. I pay "4 times as much" (I'd say more like 25-30% more, though its not an exact comparison) for an premium product in all these areas.

Like even thinking of the idea of owning 4 Windows PC's all within 20 years
I think it really depends on the person and what their computer requirements are. We are reaching I point, I believe, where the performance of computers is really plateauing. For many users, the internet is all they need and even low level computers have sufficient power to provide an enjoyable user experience. People invest in cell phones, not so much computers these days. I see people are keeping their computers longer. The average ownership is 4-5 years right now, but you have to imagine the spread on that is more like 2-8 years as there are early adopters and late.
 
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zettabyte

macrumors regular
Jun 6, 2015
105
19
Sorry but this does come off a bit pretentious. There's nothing unfeasible about that. Not everyone wants to spend money just because...There are plenty of people out there who buy for their needs. So, theoretically, I can easily see someone buying a cheap Windows PC every 5 years. I can see even more easily someone only needing a new Mac every 5-7 years.

You've said it yourself. "...I can see even more easily someone only needing a new Mac every 5-7 years..." I agree...because with a Mac you can easily get that many miles out of it as it has proven over and over again. However, with a Windows laptop, it's just hard to fathom the idea of having 4 computers in 20 years. I can't imagine that I'm the only one that feels this way. You may be an exception and that is fine. We're all entitled to our own opinions, but due to the nature of this particular scenario, I'm sure that more people would agree that this is splicing a 2-ply toilet paper to save money. ie...penny pinchers.
 
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zettabyte

macrumors regular
Jun 6, 2015
105
19
Not entirely what I am saying (or at all). I don't mind a good Windows laptop, but to suggest that you can essentially divide the price of a Mac by 4 and say that four "typical Windows notebooks" individually equal to that divided price will last 5 years each is quite a stretch and a general, uninformed statement. I've had Windows notebooks and netbooks last years, but I found it to be quite a stretch, especially with no information given other than a vague understanding of what a "Windows laptop" (whatever that means specifically) could cost.

Plus, the statement is limiting in its own right. Sure, I can go get a Tobisha Satellite or Acer E Series right now for $299-$399 and use it for the next X number of years - but what if I needed or just preferred OS X? What's the battery life on it? What's the size and weight of it? How much RAM does it come with? Do I have to preform aftermarket upgrades for the general speed to be about the same for everyday tasks? Etc etc.

I have a 4 and a half year old MacBook Pro that uses a third party SSD and has had its RAM doubled (so it's about a $1400 purchase total over the years, compared to the OP's $1600 figure) and even that many years later it still receives double the battery life that an entry level Windows notebook would advertise, and it offers a better laptop experience because it doesn't cut corners on cheap keyboards or trackpad assemblies, and honestly the speakers are still better than what seems to be shipping in a "typical" notebook 5 years later. It boots in seconds and I don't have to deal with the crawling of an aged mechanical drive that I would have to if I was almost done with "my first of four $400 notebooks in a 20 year span."

So yeah, I'm elaborating quite a bit but all I am trying to say is that it's quite an ignorant statement, mostly because it's extremely general and offers nothing other than simple mathematics and non-specified ideas. You don't just go by price or specs when purchasing or using a computer.

I get what your saying and was only replying based on a $400 price point. Was that not clear? I know I saw a $400 price point.

Nevertheless, the fact remains that we don't need 2-ply toilet paper splitters here talking about penny pinching when this is a Mac Forum. It's a premium product with a premium price. Some find the price intimidating, yet they are still here. I just don't get it...
 
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zettabyte

macrumors regular
Jun 6, 2015
105
19
Two additional points to this thread. I've owned 4 Mercedes vehicles, including a GL450 with the Off-Road Package (12" of ground clearance!) - I'm 6'7" and I don't even fit in Hondas. I also don't hear the road noise like you would in a Honda.

I run a small business, and we have both Macs and PCs. "$400 PCs" are generally crap that will not last past one fiscal year - the time and effort needed to keep one running or replaced adds several hundred dollars) that I need to pay someone to install and retrain) to that "cheap" cost.

And, I need scheduling software. We use Merlin, from a German company. A Merlin license costs me $350. A MS Project "Pro" CAL costs me $995. They do the same thing.

And, if a Mac has issues, I use my AppleCare warranty to get a Mac fixed or replaced in short order, often in the same day. My PCs? Hah!!!! Get an RMA, ship the PC to wherever (dealing with traffic is a PITA too!), then deal with the inevitable "we can't find anything wrong with your PC, "have you installed Windows/drivers/hardware properly" spiel - then wait for it to be shipped back to me.... Screw that.

I run Windows 7 or 8.1 in a Parallels VM on my Mac - it's as fast as most of my PCs. BTW, OS X is UNIX - supremely more powerful than any Windows OS I've used, and I started with 2.0 when I was working for Boeing. Two more toxic words with Windows keeps me from investing any more money in Windows that I have to - "The Registry". :mad:

Cheers!

Danke schon!...very well said and exactly my point...this is a Premium Product! Some people here are just not getting it...They are talking C grade level cars in an A grade level forum. Am I missing something? This is getting extremely silly.
 
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zettabyte

macrumors regular
Jun 6, 2015
105
19
I think it really depends on the person and what their computer requirements are. We are reaching I point, I believe, where the performance of computers is really plateauing. For many users, the internet is all they need and even low level computers have sufficient power to provide an enjoyable user experience. People invest in cell phones, not so much computers these days. I see people are keeping their computers longer. The average ownership is 4-5 years right now, but you have to imagine the spread on that is more like 2-8 years as there are early adopters and late.

Indeed. The gap is for sure narrowing. Even the most simple users can get away with a >$200 Chromebook if internet is all they need. Quality wise even the high end Windows computers over $1500-$2000+ fall short that prevents it to even come close to the built quality of a Mac.
 
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lowendlinux

macrumors 603
Sep 24, 2014
5,315
6,567
Germany
Two additional points to this thread. I've owned 4 Mercedes vehicles, including a GL450 with the Off-Road Package (12" of ground clearance!) - I'm 6'7" and I don't even fit in Hondas. I also don't hear the road noise like you would in a Honda.

I run a small business, and we have both Macs and PCs. "$400 PCs" are generally crap that will not last past one fiscal year - the time and effort needed to keep one running or replaced adds several hundred dollars) that I need to pay someone to install and retrain) to that "cheap" cost.

And, I need scheduling software. We use Merlin, from a German company. A Merlin license costs me $350. A MS Project "Pro" CAL costs me $995. They do the same thing.

And, if a Mac has issues, I use my AppleCare warranty to get a Mac fixed or replaced in short order, often in the same day. My PCs? Hah!!!! Get an RMA, ship the PC to wherever (dealing with traffic is a PITA too!), then deal with the inevitable "we can't find anything wrong with your PC, "have you installed Windows/drivers/hardware properly" spiel - then wait for it to be shipped back to me.... Screw that.

I run Windows 7 or 8.1 in a Parallels VM on my Mac - it's as fast as most of my PCs. BTW, OS X is UNIX - supremely more powerful than any Windows OS I've used, and I started with 2.0 when I was working for Boeing. Two more toxic words with Windows keeps me from investing any more money in Windows that I have to - "The Registry". :mad:

Cheers!

And where I work if an HP or a Dell goes down the the Dell tech or HP tech is there in three hours to take care of the problem even if that means a loaner with all SW and preferences installed you get what you pay for. If my Mac at work goes down I mac an appointment at the Apple store take it to them if they cannot fix it by the end of the day they give me a loaner with my HD in it.

You've said it yourself. "...I can see even more easily someone only needing a new Mac every 5-7 years..." I agree...because with a Mac you can easily get that many miles out of it as it has proven over and over again. However, with a Windows laptop, it's just hard to fathom the idea of having 4 computers in 20 years. I can't imagine that I'm the only one that feels this way. You may be an exception and that is fine. We're all entitled to our own opinions, but due to the nature of this particular scenario, I'm sure that more people would agree that this is splicing a 2-ply toilet paper to save money. ie...penny pinchers.

When you buy PC's at the same price point as Mac's you get the same longevity it's not a Mac thing it's a price point thing.

Indeed. The gap is for sure narrowing. Even the most simple users can get away with a >$200 Chromebook if internet is all they need. Quality wise even the high end Windows computers over $1500-$2000+ fall short that prevents it to even come close to the built quality of a Mac.

No they don't fall short though they may not be as pretty

====

Why do I always involve myself if HiEveryone threads they're always train wrecks :mad:
 
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