'Thumbed' passport grounds family

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by BoyBach, Oct 28, 2008.

  1. BoyBach macrumors 68040

    BoyBach

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    #1
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/dorset/7695225.stm


    Once again, common sense loses out to the jobsworths idiots anti-terror laws.

    "Welcome to the UK, where everyone is a suspect."
     
  2. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #2
    It's unfortunate, but at the same time, it's also just fair implementation of procedure. If the family were rejected for racial, ethnic, religious, or other discriminatory reasons, you have my attention. If this regulation that worn passports are not acceptable is not a real regulation, fine. Otherwise, meh.
     
  3. JNB macrumors 604

    JNB

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    #3
    I don't see how this qualifies as "news." Any ID that is excessively worn or delaminating is no longer trustworthy. Most modern ID's don't even have a physical photo covered by laminate anymore for just that reason.
     
  4. AppleMatt macrumors 68000

    AppleMatt

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    #4
    I fully support the decision. The story is playing on the fact that a 2.4 family holiday was ruined, along with the poor childrens hopes of a time away.

    The facts are that someone tried to board a plane with a potentially compromised ID. The guidelines are pretty clear, and "family with good intention" isn't a reason to make an exception.

    I wonder how the story would have been reported if it had been a young middle-eastern man going on holiday, and the airline let him board.

    AppleMatt
     
  5. djellison macrumors 68020

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    #5
    I agree. Your passport should be in perfect condition. It costs a lot of money to get one - why wouldn't you look after it with a passport holder etc?

    Doug
     
  6. notjustjay macrumors 603

    notjustjay

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    #6
    Yeah, I support the decision.

    The thread title and the first sentence of the story made it sound like it was going to be a case of silly discrimination based on the grounds that someone was deemed suspicious because he travels too much -- the passport being so well used from being opened and closed all the time.

    If that's all it was, then I would have joined in the moral outrage.

    But a delaminating passport that potentially could have been tampered with, is a legitimate case for scrutiny, I think.

    Glad to see that they're checking, though. Not everyone does. I know I once accidentally boarded a flight with someone else's passport in my hands (and mine in his) and we were waved right through.
     
  7. thecritix macrumors 6502

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    #7
    forgive me but, how many '2.4 familys' have flown civilian airliners into civilian buildings, killing thousands of people?

    maybe there's a reason that young middle eastern men are considered with a greater level of suspicion

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/september/11/newsid_2514000/2514627.stm
     
  8. chilipie macrumors 6502a

    chilipie

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    #8
    Much as I dislike the hysteria about terrorism and the often ineffective and time-wasting security measures, I'd rather the authorities were consistent. Would they have let a young middle-eastern man with a damaged passport through? No, so they shouldn't let others get away with it because they're white and with a family.
     
  9. yippy macrumors 68020

    yippy

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    #9
    However, if only one of their passports was worn, shouldn't the rest of the family been allowed to fly and only the husband would have to get a new passport.

    If the UK is anything like the US, you can get a replacement passport in a day or two for emergency situations like this and he could have simply joined them a few days later. All of them staying back would have been their choice, no?
     
  10. Henri Gaudier macrumors 6502a

    Henri Gaudier

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    #10
    Now ... if only he'd been ID chipped to the governments satisfaction then he'd be happily on his holidays. These terrorists masking themselves as family men ... it's evil. Line the bast*rd up against the wall and let him have it.;)
     
  11. R.Youden macrumors 68020

    R.Youden

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    #11
    In the UK it can take you weeks, if not months to get a new passport, thanks to the insistence of the US that we all have biometric passports (or what ever they call them)
     
  12. heehee macrumors 68020

    heehee

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    #12
    My passport is in pretty bad shape. I put it in my jeans pocket when I'm on vacation. One of the agents commented on it and asked what I did to it. He let me in though. :D
     
  13. Thanatoast macrumors 6502a

    Thanatoast

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    #13
    Just wait until the terrorists figure out they can reprogram people's chips. X-Mas '12, "Everyone's On A Watchlist" Day.
     
  14. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #14
    While it possibly can I got mine renewed in four hours recently.
     
  15. djellison macrumors 68020

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    #15
    Or you can do it same day at one of the passport centres.
     
  16. AppleMatt macrumors 68000

    AppleMatt

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    #16
    Well not many, but equally only a couple of middle Eastern men have. Considering the billions of people in the world, we're standing pretty much even. That said, spies were often trained in family units so they wouldn't be suspected. Considering major terrorist cells operate as agencies, it's not a long shot. It's important not to let emotion drive policy here.

    Im not sure what your point is though, because the very nature of this story highlights that everyone is subject to the same rules - rightly so; good intention isn't valid excuse. The next 'big attack' could come from a white Christian extremist. Unlikely? Probably what a lot of people thought on Sep 10th 2001.

    The point is, the family broke the rules and got dissapointment. If the airlines broke the rules, potentially a lot of people could die. I'd rather they err on the sure of caution for the flights I catch.

    AppleMatt
     
  17. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #17
    Not yet.

    Agree.

    These days, proper documents are even more important.
     
  18. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

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    #18
    I'm pretty sure they would use read-only chips in passports and other official documents.
     
  19. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #19
    Hopefully this would be extremely difficult if not impossible, but it is also just another argument against watchlists and in favor of uniform execution of process.

    One of the famous rallying cries for us (USA) on the issue of civil liberty is this statement, possibly originally from Benjamin Franklin: "They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety."

    The right to travel with a worn out passport is not an essentially liberty or a civil liberty at all. The right to be free from discrimination is. I don't think there's any compelling argument that uniform enforcement of rules leads to reduced transit safety. I don't care if it's inconvenient to enforce rules uniformly. It's the right thing to do.
     
  20. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #20
    You might be correct.

    Depends on the chip/card.
     
  21. Willis macrumors 68020

    Willis

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    #21
    I think the decision was a little hard. In todays world, we're able to check passports for their authenticity, and if there is no visible sign of tampering, why refuse travel. Their reason for telling him he couldnt travel was that it was worn, not tampered.

    When I went to Italy this year, I traveled via EuroTunnel and they didn't even ask to see anyones passport in the car. It was only when we were returning that the British passport control in France was checking every car and searching around 8/10 cars. Luckily again, we didn't get searched either.
     
  22. kkat69 macrumors 68020

    kkat69

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    #22
    I will say it's better this than what happened to me. Us in the military back in the day had ID cards that were laminated (this is way before the credit card style cards they have now) and my lamination got so 'thumbed' that I was able to slip a picture of Han Solo over my picture and run around the base with it, I used it at the BX and they checked them on the way in and when you purchased, at the gate, etc and each time no one noticed that I was NOT Han Solo.

    During basic training in the military the drill instructors would gain access to the dorm (the doors are pre-locked from the outside) by holding up ID's to the window. We were required to check the name on the ID AND the picture. They would often time, hold up fake ID's wither with the picture correct and the name different OR the picture incorrect and the name correct to test us to see if we're doing our job by checking BOTH things. I got tested with a picture of Micky mouse on the badge. I had him yelling at me though the glass telling me to let him in and I refused until he held up the proper ID card.

    So in a way I can see the how the airline rep did what they did.
     
  23. t0mat0 macrumors 603

    t0mat0

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    #23
    Already shown to be possible. They messed the RFID tags up really thinking they would be the bees knees in security.
     
  24. Henri Gaudier macrumors 6502a

    Henri Gaudier

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    #24
    Why is everyone so obedient? FFS! Nothing positive was achieved in this incident. It's just another example of how oppressive states are becoming. How doing ordinary things has the state wanting to know ever more about you, your finger prints or DNA or iris scan.

    I can drive to any country in europe and where there were once borders and guards now there is nothing. That's the way it should be. If I'm doing something wrong, the authorities will be listening to my phone calls, putting in secret CCTV cameras into my light fitting etc .. in short building a case against me. Yet if I'm doing nothing wrong I can drive over the border to Italy relatively unobserved by the state. That's decent. As an Englishman and EU citizen he should be allowed to fly anywhere within the EU without the need for a passport. I can't believe how many people love being told what to do by unelected officials.
     
  25. BoyBach thread starter macrumors 68040

    BoyBach

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    #25

    I heartily agree.

    This story is just another example of the jumped up jobsworths on a power trip who seem to have flourished over recent years.
     

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