Tiling in a shower

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by pvmacguy, Jul 24, 2014.

  1. pvmacguy macrumors 65816

    pvmacguy

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2009
    Location:
    Jax
    #1
    Anyone ever done any tiling? I have a bathtub/shower combo and looking to do a little upgrading to it. Right now it has 3 walls of tile that go 3/4 up to the ceiling. I'm thinking about upgrading the tile to something newer and extend to the ceiling.

    My question, where the tile stops now it is just painted drywall board. It doesn't get wet right now just steamy from the hot water. Would that be ok to tile over, or would I need to cut out that drywall and replace with backerboard?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Gregg2 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
  3. pvmacguy thread starter macrumors 65816

    pvmacguy

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2009
    Location:
    Jax
  4. Zh2 macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2011
    Location:
    In a house in England.
    #4
    Hi,

    1. Replace it. It will almost certainly have absorbed moisture. When tiled over, it will dry out and begin to crumble. Better safe than sorry!

    2. When you come to putting the new tiles on. Pre-weight the shower tub / floor with the approximate weight of a human being. Use old towels or cardboard to protect the unit and then add the weights. Many people forget to do this - Its all tiled up and grouted. It looks superb. As soon as you step in there, you break the grout seal and allow water in.

    Cheers.

    Z.
     
  5. prostuff1 macrumors 65816

    prostuff1

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2005
    Location:
    Don't step into the kawoosh...
    #5
    Take it all out and put backboard in. You will either need a plastic membrane behind the backerboard or something over it. I suggest putting the backboard up without plastic behind it and then painting on something like RedGard. Follow the directions and then you can tile right over it.

    DO NOT use "green board" is the water resistant and made to use in bathroom areas but not in a shower area itself. I guess you could technically use it if you were going to use RedGard but still, I would stay away from the stuff in area with constant water from a shower/bath.

    You should not be grouting the area between the tub and tile anyway. A 100% silicon caulk should be the only thing in that area. Same goes for the vertical changes in plane, use caulk there also.
     
  6. senseless macrumors 68000

    senseless

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2008
    Location:
    Pennsylvania, USA
    #6
    Drywall in a shower? What kind of builder did this?
     
  7. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #7
    I think it's pretty normal. Tile doesn't need to go all the way up to the ceiling if your ceilings are high (or your builder was short).
     
  8. pvmacguy thread starter macrumors 65816

    pvmacguy

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2009
    Location:
    Jax
    #8
    Thank you for all that information! It will greatly help me. I am wondering though, when I look at the tile now. I question if they laid backer/green board on top of the drywall and then tiled over becuase the tile around the edges finishes with a bull nose as if the area is thicker than the wall above the tile.

    As far as drywall in the shower, I'm pretty sure thats standard with large condo construction where it would have cost too much to bring the tile to the ceiling. But I will say, the HOA I'm on there we sued the developer for shoddy construction.
     
  9. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #9
    I agree. Replace the shower stall walls with a shower rated drywall/board, before re-tiling. The OP might be surprised what he discovers behind the walls, but even if no leaks, it's prudent to start fresh.
     

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