Tim Cook and Larry Page Working to Address Patent Issues Between Apple and Google

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Reuters reports that Apple CEO Tim Cook and Google CEO Larry Page have been participating in active discussions to address patent issues relating to the two companies, "keeping the lines of communication open" as patent battles between Apple on one side and Google and its Android hardware partners on the other side continue to rage.
Google Inc CEO Larry Page and Apple CEO Tim Cook have been conducting behind-the-scenes conversations about a range of intellectual property matters, including the ongoing mobile patent disputes between the companies, according to people familiar with the matter.

The two chief executives had a phone conversation last week, the sources said. Discussions involving lower-level officials of the two companies are also ongoing.
The two executives and their associates have reportedly been discussing some sort of settlement truce addressing some of the more minor issues that have been included in the disputes between the two companies. It is unclear, however, whether a broader agreement to address larger issues is also on the table.

Late last week, Apple was awarded over $1 billion in a jury verdict deciding that Samsung had infringed upon Apple's patents and trade dress with a number of its Android products. With Google's acquisition of Motorola Mobility, which has been involved in patent litigation with Apple for some time, Apple and Google are now also essentially competing head-to-head in the courts over these issues.

Article Link: Tim Cook and Larry Page Working to Address Patent Issues Between Apple and Google
 

MattJessop

macrumors regular
Apr 24, 2007
215
42
Manchester, UK
I think pretty much everyone on both sides can agree this is good to an extent. I get the need to protect your intellectual property, but there's just so much effort going into lawsuits that I would be happier seeing go into innovation and making products better. Innovation is enough to keep the market competitive.
 

BC2009

macrumors 68000
Jul 1, 2009
1,929
236
This is good. There's no way to consider this a bad thing on any level.
Agreed. As a shareholder of AAPL, I would love it Apple and Google achieved a cross-licensing agreement with a "no-cloning" clause with Apple getting revenue from every Android device sold.

An agreement like this would do more to help Apple maintain their uniqueness in the market than a dozen lawsuit wins on two-year-old smartphones. It would also make Apple some serious extra revenue.
 

samcraig

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Jun 22, 2009
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Agreed. As a shareholder of AAPL, I would love it Apple and Google achieved a cross-licensing agreement with a "no-cloning" clause with Apple getting revenue from every Android device sold.

An agreement like this would do more to help Apple maintain their uniqueness in the market than a dozen lawsuit wins on two-year-old smartphones. It would also make Apple some serious extra revenue.

I don't agree with all of your points. I do hope Apple and Google come to agreements. What you're suggesting is that it all favors Apple. I want the agreements to be in the best interest of both companies and subsequently - any companies that do business with either.
 

BJMRamage

macrumors 68020
Oct 2, 2007
2,457
881
maybe thermonuclear is not a Big Bang Sue and Destroy move but a Slowly Suck Away Loads of Cash from your Competitor with every sale they have as well as with your sales. Android Phones already are selling for less than value and if Apple takes a cut for each device sold, not based on selling price, it is a Win:Win for Apple.
 

saving107

macrumors 603
Oct 14, 2007
6,376
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San Jose, Ca
I think pretty much everyone on both sides can agree this is good to an extent. I get the need to protect your intellectual property, but there's just so much effort going into lawsuits that I would be happier seeing go into innovation and making products better. Innovation is enough to keep the market competitive.
I recently switched to the Nokia Lumia 900 and since Microsoft introduced their Windows Phone I have been impressed with what they have done on that platform, and with their 7.5 Mango update and the introduction of the Lumia 900 I was ready to make the jump.

I feel like Microsoft (and Nokia) put in a great amount of effort to come up with a UI that is completely original and unlike others in both software and hardware.
 

nick_elt

macrumors 68000
Oct 28, 2011
1,578
0
I recently switched to the Nokia Lumia 900 and since Microsoft introduced their Windows Phone I have been impressed with what they have done on that platform, and with their 7.5 Mango update and the introduction of the Lumia 900 I was ready to make the jump.

I feel like Microsoft (and Nokia) put in a great amount of effort to come up with a UI that is completely original and unlike others in both software and hardware.
Gotta love 'em updates! MS FTW! Lol
 

maflynn

Moderator
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May 3, 2009
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Boston
Now Goggle wants to talk.
Who says that Google instigated the conversation. By all accounts they've always been open to negotiation, its apple that decided to issue a thermonuclear war on android, not the other way around.
 

KnightWRX

macrumors Pentium
Jan 28, 2009
15,046
4
Quebec, Canada
Google is scared and does not want to assume the position. ;)
Google isn't running scared at all. I think both parties are probably just tired of the warring, it's counter productive and prevents building on the shoulders of giants. Best to just cross-license what they have instead of searching for prior art, invalidating, working around patents, etc..

Both parties infringe on patents, Apple does it, Google does it. It's not willful, with patents, sometimes it's just darn hard to even know a patent exists and that your solution infringes on it. Heck, even when you know of a patent, it's hard to determine infringement, with plaintiffs claiming as hard as they can you are, and you explaining the cases the patent doesn't cover, not to mention the prior art that invalidates it.

Wasted energy on both sides, for all players. Sometimes, just paying licensing fees that are reasonable to all and cross-licensing agreements are just best. It's cheaper than litigating and ressources can concentrate on implementing new technology.
 

samcraig

macrumors P6
Jun 22, 2009
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Now Goggle wants to talk.
Now Apple wants to talk. See how that works?

Who says that Google instigated the conversation. By all accounts they've always been open to negotiation, its apple that decided to issue a thermonuclear war on android, not the other way around.
Exactly

Google isn't running scared at all. I think both parties are probably just tired of the warring, it's counter productive and prevents building on the shoulders of giants. Best to just cross-license what they have instead of searching for prior art, invalidating, working around patents, etc..

Both parties infringe on patents, Apple does it, Google does it. It's not willful, with patents, sometimes it's just darn hard to even know a patent exists and that your solution infringes on it. Heck, even when you know of a patent, it's hard to determine infringement, with plaintiffs claiming as hard as they can you are, and you explaining the cases the patent doesn't cover, not to mention the prior art that invalidates it.

Wasted energy on both sides, for all players. Sometimes, just paying licensing fees that are reasonable to all and cross-licensing agreements are just best. It's cheaper than litigating and ressources can concentrate on implementing new technology.
Exactly - and the suits aren't exactly good PR for EITHER company.