Time Capsule setup questions

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by AppleFan360, Apr 17, 2008.

  1. AppleFan360 macrumors 68020

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    Jan 26, 2008
    #1
    Yesterday I set up my Time Capsule as a client to my existing N/G/B network powered by a linksys router. Everything seems to work fine. Backups flow from my iMac and Macbook without issue. The USB HP printer connected to the TC works fine.

    I have read reviews and posts about how users configure the TC as a "bridge". What exactly does this mean? Would it be better if my TC ran as a separate wireless N only network for backing up? If I do this, will the wireless G Windows PC's be able to access the TC?

    Thanks.
     
  2. skorpien macrumors 68020

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    #2
    A bridge effectively extends the current network. In your AirPort Utility, enable bridge mode and then connect your current router to your Time Capsule's LAN port (not WAN). This allows the original router to perform DHCP, NAT and other functions, and ensures that computers joining one router will be able to see and access computers/HDDs/printers on the other router (as your TC will only be acting as a wireless access point or WAP).

    Without bridge mode, the TC will set up an entirely different network and any computers connected to the Linksys won't see/access TC connected computers, the TC's HDD or USB printer.

    My suggestion would be to keep your Linksys for b/g devices and set up your TC in bridge mode broadcasting in n-only 5 GHz as a WAP. This way b/g devices don't slow down n devices, n and b/g devices can see each other/access TC, and there'd be no need to switch from one network to the next just to back up or network computers together (which you'd need to do if the TC wasn't in bridge mode).
     
  3. netnothing macrumors 68040

    netnothing

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    #3
    So let me understand because I think I want to do this to setup in Bridge mode. The setup will go something like this:

    Cable Modem ---wired---> Linksys (B/G) ---wired---> Time Capsule (n only)

    In this setup, you can still plug devices into the wired ports on either router. Time Capsule also at this point just refers back to the Linksys to obtain and pass through IP address seemlessly?

    And any device connected to either router through wired or wireless be be available on the network? How about shared printers/drives on the Time Capsule?

    -Kevin
     
  4. AppleFan360 thread starter macrumors 68020

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    Jan 26, 2008
    #4
    Thanks for the reply and the help. Excellent suggestions. I will try them out this weekend.
     
  5. skorpien macrumors 68020

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    #5
    You got it. Everything will be accessible through the entire network. I like to think of it as one network with two SSIDs (two ways to connect to the same network). Any printers will be shared across both routers, as well as any networked drives and computers. And yes, the Linksys will be the one assigning IP addresses. The TC will only be a wireless access point.

    And Chris, you're welcome. Although I've come upon some information that would suggest that you may have to connect your Time Capsule to your other router via the Time Capsule's WAN port (I wouldn't know as I haven't tried this setup). Sorry for the confusion. I'm learning as I go along here too...
     
  6. AppleFan360 thread starter macrumors 68020

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    #6
    It works! The Time Capsule is now a bridged network to the Linksys router broadcasting only 5 GHZ "N" while the Linksys does the 2.4 GHZ b/g/n. All computers can see the internal and external TC drives. Speeds on the Apple TV and Macbook have shot through the roof.

    I did discover what you said in your post. The Linksys needs to be hooked to the WAN port on the TC. I also had to reset the TC to the default settings to get it to work correctly.

    Thanks a bunch for you help!
     
  7. netnothing macrumors 68040

    netnothing

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    #7
    Got my TC setup in Bridge mode as well. The Linksys is doing G only 2.4GHz, while the TC is doing N only 5GHz.

    Took about 2 1/2 hours connected via GigE to backup 55GB for the first backup.

    Setup a Canon printer to the USB port on the TC. Both Macs see it fine, but can't print. Gives the No Pages Found error. Funny thing is....I installed Bonjour on my XP machine, and that can print to the Canon fine. Sad Apple :(

    -Kevin
     
  8. ks-man macrumors 6502a

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    Sep 25, 2007
    #8
    You recommend going from modem to linksys to time capsule and having the linksys serve as the router and TC acting as an access point. Would it be the same, better or worse if you had the modem connect to the TC and then connect the Linksys to the TC?

    My thoughts are the router in the TC should be better/newer than most people's b/g Linksys routers so why not use the TC as the router and the Linksys as the access point? With this setup could you still have the TC set up for N-only mode?

    Thanks.
     
  9. hazzzwu macrumors newbie

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    Apr 21, 2008
    #9
    Thanks for the info sir... However I'd like to throw a question here...
    I've followed the information from you as above, and now I kept my Linksys b/g which broadcast original network (let say network A) and TC has created new network (Network B) with its 5GHz n-only. I set up this using my iMac.

    I also have another Macbook Air laptop and HP Windows laptop (only support b/g).

    Everytime we start the computers, the default connection should be connected to Network A or Network B ?
     
  10. AppleFan360 thread starter macrumors 68020

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    #10
    Good point. I would think it won't make a difference in my case. The Linksys WRT-330N router that I'm using is a Gigabyte router with the same specs as the TC. I agree with you though. If someone is using an older router with a smaller "pipe", that router (linksys or whatever) should be at the end of the food chain. Meaning, the TC should be connected directly to the cable modem and the Linksys should be in bridge mode (if that's possible).
     
  11. AppleFan360 thread starter macrumors 68020

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    #11
    Your b/g 2.4 GHZ computers will not even see Network B since it's running at 5 GHZ.
     
  12. netnothing macrumors 68040

    netnothing

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    #12
    Personally, I don't thing it matters when it comes to your internet connection. You connection from your ISP is not ever going to reach the speeds of your internal network. Most cable modem packages have you at 6-8Mbps....and even with powerboost with Comcast, that only jumps to 20Mbps. Maybe a fiber connection like FIOS might matter.....but I'm not sure about that.

    In my case, I kept my old WRT54G Linksys as the main router connected to the cable modem, and setup the TC to be in bridge mode. However, because both my Mac Pro and XP machine have Gigabit Ethernet ports, I moved them over to the TC so sharing between them is at GigE speeds (I've seen a boost from the 10MBps to 20-30MBps with the GigE connection).

    I also think Apple makes it SOOOOO easy to setup the TC in bridge mode, that it's easier to make that the bridged router, than trying to futz with Linksys.

    Plus, with the TC plugged directly into the Linksys.....no matter how you connected, you can see all the other devices on the network. It's working out nicely.

    Just some of my thoughts.

    -Kevin
     
  13. AppleFan360 thread starter macrumors 68020

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    #13
    I agree with you. The GigE connection is overkill for any internet connection. I was referring more toward device data sharing on the network. If the TC is used as the main router, all devices should be plugged into that and an older Linksys should be used strictly as a wireless b/g device.

    But, like you said, setting up the TC in bridge mode is very easy and probably a better way to go assuming it's easy to plug other Ethernet devices into the TC.
     
  14. netnothing macrumors 68040

    netnothing

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    #14
    Agreed. Also...make sure you test your connection using Network Utility. I plugged my old Cat5 cables into the TC and both my Mac Pro and XP machine stayed at 100Mbps. Found a couple Cat5e cables and boom....1000Mbps!!!

    Between those 2 machines, transfers scream. Also, Wireless N to my Macbook and the GigE connection to the Mac Pro make those transfers really fast as well.

    If you have this setup, only plug devices into the Linksys that can only handle 10/100Mbps (like my Tivos).

    -Kevin
     
  15. skorpien macrumors 68020

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    #15
    It all depends on what you want from your network. I've read of some people using VoIP or other such services that require QoS (of which the TC is not capable afaik) or having routers that also act as their modems, so having TC in bridge is the only option in that situation. I've also read of users that prefer the other routers' firewall settings and claim TC is inferior in that department. I myself have my TC as the main router with my Linksys as my bridge as I don't need any of those other services other routers provide. Plus I've come to really like the reserved IP function of my TC. I've always had to set up static IPs, which is a pain in the @$$ for laptops that travel with you.

    Your default network should be the one to which you want to connect. For example, with the MBA, it should be Network B (5 GHz N). And like somebody else mentioned, your b/g machine won't even see the N network, so you're stuck with Network A :p
     
  16. hazzzwu macrumors newbie

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    Apr 21, 2008
    #16

    Thanks Chris and Skorpien, I've finalized the settings and you guys are correct the windows laptop wont work in Network B (5 GHz).

    However, for MP3 songs access using iTunes or Media Player (in my windows laptop), I experience quite slow. I mean I put all the MP3 songs collection in TC, then I use iTunes or Media player to access TC to play the songs. Any Clue?

    Skorpien, what does MBA stands for?
     
  17. hazzzwu macrumors newbie

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    Apr 21, 2008
    #17
    Kevin, I am interested in boosting up the speed. By the way, what do u mean by: "However, because both my Mac Pro and XP machine have Gigabit Ethernet ports, I moved them over to the TC so sharing between them is at GigE speeds " as you mentioned above?

    Are you referrring to a wired connection? What is Gigabit Ethernet Ports?
     
  18. netnothing macrumors 68040

    netnothing

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    #18
    Yes, both my Mac Pro and my XP machine are desktops. Therefore they are wired to the TC. The Linksys router I have it older, and can only handle 10Mbps or 100Mbps connections. These are MegaBITs per second. Roughly, a 100Mbps connection will transfer data at about 10 MB (MegaBYTES) per second.

    A Gigabit ethernet port is 1000Mbps. With this you will see those 10MB per second speeds of 100Mbps, go up to 20-30MB per second.

    Because both my Mac Pro and my XP machine have network cards that can handle 10/100/1000Mbps speeds, by plugging them into the TC and using either Cat5e or Cat6 cables, I'm able to get the maximum speeds of Gigabit Ethernet, or 1000Mbps.

    You can tell what speed your current link is running at by opening Network Utility (Applications -> Utilities -> Network Utility). Under the Info tab you can select your link and see the current speed. In my case, my Mac Pro shows the Link Speed as 1 Gbit/s. In XP, it's under the Network Connections, and check the Status of the connection.

    In order to get the speeds, you need not only a Router that has 1000Mbps ports, but the network cards in each machine need to support 1000Mbps.

    Hope this helps.

    -Kevin
     
  19. skorpien macrumors 68020

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    #19
    MBA is the acronym for MacBook Air. Just short hand for those too lazy to type it out :eek:

    Your access speeds for your Windows laptop are, unfortunately, limited to 54 Mbps transfer rate. That's theoretically a maximum of 6.75 MB/s (real world speeds are usually quite lower). That may be why you're experiencing the slow access times. I haven't tried moving my library over to my Time Capsule, so I really wouldn't have many suggestions, sorry. Hopefully somebody else could help you in that department.
     
  20. amiroo79 macrumors newbie

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    Apr 16, 2008
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    Calabasas, CA
    #20
    I'm a newbie and I just bought a MacBook last night with a Time Capsule. I am very much impressed. I went through the setup not knowing much of what I was doing but I was able to get the Time Capsule to replace my current Linksys G Router. My MacBook recognized the Time Capsule and I created a back and surfed the internet just fine at very fast speeds than I was before.

    Only problem now is that my iPhone can't connect to the TimeCapule's AirPort. It's a secured network so when it sees it, it asks for the password. I enter it but it just asks me to enter the password again.

    Strange... I can connect to other networks in the area just fine with the iPhone so I know it's not the iPhone. So, can it be some setting on the Time Capsule that I need to get right before I can connect with my iPhone?

    Thank you in advance for helping this newbie out!
     
  21. netnothing macrumors 68040

    netnothing

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    #21
    What if you reset the password to something simple, just as a test. Then once it connects and you know everything works, change it to a more secure password.

    Also, did you setup the Timed MAC address filtering? It is not setup by default, so it would have been something you did.

    -Kevin
     
  22. MattZani macrumors 68030

    MattZani

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    #22
    so how's it all setup? I'm using a netgear wireless modem/router, so I just take one of the ethenets from the back and plug it into the wan port of tc? I'm pretty sure i understand, but a couple pics of the back of your routers and tc's would be helpful!
     
  23. netnothing macrumors 68040

    netnothing

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    #23
    Yup, basically it goes:

    Network cable from the Cable Modem into the WAN port on the Netgear. Network cable from any of the LAN ports on the Netgear out to the WAN port on the TC. Think of the TC as just any other networked device.

    In the Airport Utility for the TC, setup the TC in Bridge mode and create a new wireless network 802.11n 5GHz only.

    TC will get an IP address from the Netgear, and will pass on assigned IPs to any connected devices.

    Let me know if you have problems.

    -Kevin
     
  24. MattZani macrumors 68030

    MattZani

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    #24
    Ok thanks, can you setup TC with a PC? I'm not sure if I should wait till June on the MBP, but want the TC ASAP
     
  25. skorpien macrumors 68020

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    #25
    Yup. Just install AirPort Utility for Windows from the CD that comes with the TC.
     

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