TUAW posts antenna video with ACTUAL numbers

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Vertigo50, Jul 6, 2010.

  1. Vertigo50 macrumors 65816

    Vertigo50

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    #1
  2. Vertigo50 thread starter macrumors 65816

    Vertigo50

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    #2
    I know people may be getting tired of antenna threads, but this video is more conclusive than most. No comments?
     
  3. jhatz macrumors member

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    #3
    Wowwwwwwwwwwwwwww, that women's voice is annoying.
     
  4. dagomike macrumors 65816

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  5. bluenoise macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    I haven't seen the video, yet, but do they show it running on older iPhones, too?
     
  6. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #6
    No because the problem is not inherent in the 3Gs (or older) phones because apple changed the antenna location.

    irregardless of apple saying its just a software issue with what's being reported. It is a design flaw with the antenna being in contact with the skin which then interferes with the reception.

    I've seen some stuff with the speedtest.net which also confirms its a hardware issue not a software bug.
     
  7. br0adband macrumors 6502a

    br0adband

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  8. mgamber macrumors 6502a

    mgamber

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    It's a good video but it still uses an iPhone program to display the data. What I'd like to see is someone insert a power/SWR meter between the transmitter final and antenna and see what the SWR looks like as you bridge that non-conductive gap. That someone will need more money and expertise than I, however, so I wait. That would be 100% conclusive proof that it's a hardware problem instead of the current 97%.

    I'm also getting kind of tired of this "death grip of doom" bulls**t. You don't need to "death grip" the phone, you don't need to "grip" it, you don't even need to touch it. Simply hold a wire and cross the non-conductive gap and poof, all your signals are belong to us.
     
  9. peterjcat macrumors 6502

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    #9
    1. That is begging the question, ie assuming what you are trying to prove. We need to see the same test run on the 3G/3GS to work out how much of the problem is to do with the design, we can't just say "We don't need tests because the problem is to do with the design".

    2. Irregardless isn't a word.

    3. Speedtest.net tests don't prove one way or another whether it's a hardware or a software issue. All they prove is that it's not simply a problem with the number of bars being displayed, but nobody is saying that it is.

    Edit: Good on Erica for writing the application, though, and it's good to see these results confirming what Anandtech found, though it's actually less of a drop than they discovered: -95 to -113 is only -18 dB, and goes to show that -95 isn't a particularly awesome signal and shouldn't be getting 5 bars in the first place.
     
  10. Ferris23 macrumors 68020

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    #10
    This was already posted. I'm not trying to be an ass but if you check the date on a story, and it was yesterday, wouldn't you think that it would already be posted at this of all sites?
     
  11. Chupa Chupa macrumors G5

    Chupa Chupa

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    #11
    +1
     
  12. dagomike macrumors 65816

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    #12
    That would be interesting, but not sure it would really matter. I doubt the phone is lying to itself. It's just lying to the users.
     
  13. Sir Ruben macrumors 65816

    Sir Ruben

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    #13
    Why was another topic created on the same old tired subject. Nobody cares anymore. Yawn.
     
  14. dagomike macrumors 65816

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    #14
    All good points, but regardless of what the 3GS would show, the iPhone 4's crappy reception is still crappy reception.
     
  15. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #15
    Oh really that's why webster has an entry for it. :rolleyes:

    Sure it does, bandwidth is being affected. Apple's response has been that the logic used to visually represent signal strength is incorrect and a fix will be sent to adjust the logic. The speedtest.net shows its just not display issue but a signal strength issue, i.e., hardware.
     
  16. mgamber macrumors 6502a

    mgamber

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    Yeah, I agree, and I did say it does go 97% of the way to prove it's hardware, but at what point does it stop lying? Who knows. External hardware attached to show the SWR go nuts as you bridge the gap would be 100% proof that you could take to Cupertino and make Jobs eat. Or, more importantly, that you could give to a lawyer who could take it to court and force Apple to fix the bazillion they're so proud of having sold.

    FYI: SWR is a ratio of power sent to and reflected back from the antenna. 1:1 is perfect, no standing waves, all power sent down the line is radiated out from the antenna. When an antenna isn't exactly resonant or doesn't match the power source resistance or feed (or both), the SWR goes back which means some of the power being sent out is reflected back to the transmitter and lost as heat. If it's bad enough and the power is high enough, it will fry the final stage of the transmitter.

    The iPhone 4 actually has BETTER reception with the exception of this one problem. Put it in a case and it works better than any iPhone to date. Personally, mine hasn't dropped a call yet in the same places where I was never, in two years, able to hold a call longer than 5 minutes. Not even once.

    Edit: The external portion of the antenna is why it has better reception than any iPhone before it. All Apple needs to do it replace the metal band, the entire metal band, with the exact same thing coated in a non-conductive material that won't easily chip or flake. Even better would be to take the band out of the equation entirely and, instead, put a groove on the inside of the band (assuming it's not already hollow), run a wire up that groove and use that for the antenna. All Apple is accomplishing with their "software fix" is lowering expectations that the phone will work at all in any given location. And you can be sure AT&T won't give a damn. They go by their reception map when you try to cancel a contract without an ETF, not the math formula du jour as dictated by Apple.
     
  17. dagomike macrumors 65816

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    I think I'm just saying the results from these decibel tests are pretty intuitive to what we would expect from real-world experiences. It doesn't prove anything, but I'd say actually measuring the antenna would be more of an exercise of curiosity than something needed to make the app credible.

    I haven't noticed better signal. I suppose I should test this more in very low signal coverage, but generally the bars have read lower than the 3GS when just sitting on a table in my home.

    To me it's also silly to say it's better IF... My 3GS has better reception if I climb up on my roof. But I don't want to do that to make call, just like I don't want to be mindful of what I touch when using a phone.

    It does work better with a case, however. I still drop more calls, but the signal bar at least doesn't drop.
     
  18. mgamber macrumors 6502a

    mgamber

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    #18
    At home I have awful reception but since I have any at all, I can't get out of the contract. I also have two 3G's, a 3GS and two iPhone 4s and, without a doubt, the two iPhone 4s do much better than any of the other iPhones. Data is consistently and measureably faster and calls don't get dropped. What's worse, AT&T rolled out their microcell "nationwide" but it's not available here so I'm thinking of getting a repeater. They're more expensive, a decent one starts around $350, but there's no activation, they don't use your broadband connection, there's no monthly charge....to use your broadband connection...and they work great as long as you have any reception at all. They cover both bands, 3G and voice and you can buy a directional yagi antenna with lots of gain and point it right at a tower if you barely have reception on the best of days.
     
  19. dagomike macrumors 65816

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    #19
    What repeater are you looking at?
     
  20. bluenoise macrumors 6502a

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    #20
    If I hold my old 3G a certain way, the bars drop just like on my iP4.
     
  21. mrblack927 macrumors 6502a

    mrblack927

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    #21
    Same here, I got out my old 3GS again just to try it.
     
  22. dagomike macrumors 65816

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    #22
    It's been established that most all phones attenuate when held. The iPhone 4, however is much worse to the point of instant transmission loss. The iPhone 4 drops calls/data where the 3GS doesn't.
     
  23. bluenoise macrumors 6502a

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    #23
    I don't doubt that is happening, but I haven't experienced it, yet. In fact, my iP4 has maintained calls through an area where my 3G often dropped. I don't hold either phone in my hand, though, when driving.
     
  24. diabolic macrumors 68000

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    #24
    That's how I feel about the signal loss issue others are discussing. I don't ever bridge the antenna seam or cup the antenna in my palm when I use the phone. I'd have to really go out of my way to try to do it.

    In everyday use, my 3GS dropped far more calls than my iPhone 4 does. I use mine everyday and count on it for my business. If it were worse than the 3GS I would have returned it immediately.
     
  25. dagomike macrumors 65816

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    #25
    I don't doubt some people have no problems. It's multivariate, so a single experience doesn't represent the whole.
     

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