(UK) iPhone upgrade program a rip off?

SgtHobNob

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 22, 2017
2
0
I currently have an iPhone 8 Plus on the upgrade program in the UK, I would like to upgrade to an iPhone X if I'm lucky enough to be able to get my hands on one on the 3rd November. I have been debating different options, whether to upgrade using the upgrade program/buy it outright/through a carrier etc, and I'm now not sure whether or not the upgrade program in the UK is actually a good deal or not.

I am going to use the iPhone X 256gb as an example on the upgrade program, I am also going to take tax off the price of the UK and show in GBP and USD.

In the US no deposit is required, just 24 even monthly instalments of $56.16 and you can upgrade after 12 payments ($673.92). In the UK a deposit of £55.20/$72.86 and 20 monthly instalments of £51.16/$67.53 you can upgrade after 11 payments (£617.96/$815.70).

If I was to upgrade at the earliest available opportunity I would end up paying $141.78 more than someone in the USA for the same thing. I understand that exchange rates change, but I can't help but feel that the US upgrade program is a much better deal than the one in the UK.

If I was to make all 20 payments I would end up paying $1423.49, versus 24 payments in the US is $1347.84, I think a difference of $75.65 after 2 years is reasonable.

What do you think? Am I missing something?
 

The Game 161

macrumors Core
Dec 15, 2010
19,373
9,499
UK
I currently have an iPhone 8 Plus on the upgrade program in the UK, I would like to upgrade to an iPhone X if I'm lucky enough to be able to get my hands on one on the 3rd November. I have been debating different options, whether to upgrade using the upgrade program/buy it outright/through a carrier etc, and I'm now not sure whether or not the upgrade program in the UK is actually a good deal or not.

I am going to use the iPhone X 256gb as an example on the upgrade program, I am also going to take tax off the price of the UK and show in GBP and USD.

In the US no deposit is required, just 24 even monthly instalments of $56.16 and you can upgrade after 12 payments ($673.92). In the UK a deposit of £55.20/$72.86 and 20 monthly instalments of £51.16/$67.53 you can upgrade after 11 payments (£617.96/$815.70).

If I was to upgrade at the earliest available opportunity I would end up paying $141.78 more than someone in the USA for the same thing. I understand that exchange rates change, but I can't help but feel that the US upgrade program is a much better deal than the one in the UK.

If I was to make all 20 payments I would end up paying $1423.49, versus 24 payments in the US is $1347.84, I think a difference of $75.65 after 2 years is reasonable.

What do you think? Am I missing something?
Well the payment program is different to IUP.

you can only upgrade on IUP where the payments you have 20 months to pay. The USA it will always be cheaper due to the brexit
 

SgtHobNob

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Oct 22, 2017
2
0
Well the payment program is different to IUP.

you can only upgrade on IUP where the payments you have 20 months to pay. The USA it will always be cheaper due to the brexit
You can blame brexit for the USD/GBP exchange rate, however I don't think thats an excuse for paying a deposit and more each month than in the US.
 

apolloa

macrumors G5
Oct 21, 2008
12,221
7,671
Time, because it rules EVERYTHING!
You can blame brexit for the USD/GBP exchange rate, however I don't think thats an excuse for paying a deposit and more each month than in the US.
No you cannot blame ‘brexit’, this is a pure myth, the pound does NOT equal 1 dollar and it never has, yet Microsoft and Apple have decided to charge £1 for every $1, it’s a complete rip off! And the big electronics giants are just makeing a lot more money out of it.
However in the UK you get a 12 month warranty as required by law I think, in the US you don’t, so I’m not sure if that has an impact?
 

Hermes Monster

macrumors 65816
May 4, 2010
1,144
304
UK
You’re also forgetting sales tax, which is between 8 and 13% I believe -it’s still less than the UK mind.