UK members that work in the trades?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by SoundMan, Feb 10, 2018.

  1. SoundMan macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2010
    #1
    Hi everyone,

    I wanted to ask members that are part of the trades in the UK some question's. Over here in Ontario Canada you must enter the Apprenticeship program and complete in school training and then let's say 5900 hours before you get your papers.

    Doesn't matter if it's becoming an Electrician, HVAC, Framing etc

    I wanted to know is everything the same in the United Kingdom? with it being controlled by the Government.

    I will coming over for a few years and enjoy Tiling over-here. I emailed this school teaching Tiling and never heard back as I asked the same question.

    http://www.tiling-courses.co.uk/

    any help would be great.

    Thank you:)
     
  2. Apple fanboy macrumors Nehalem

    Apple fanboy

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #2
    I don't work in the trades, but here in the U.K. unless it's gas you don't need any papers.
     
  3. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #3
    I’m curious, are trade profession qualification such as apprentice, journeyman, and master (master electrician) based on unions that give structure and oversight to this learning? My impression is they do. I live in The States.
     
  4. Apple fanboy macrumors Nehalem

    Apple fanboy

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #4
    Electricians and gas engineers have codes and safety qualifications.
    Anyone can work as a plasterer, plumber or tiler. Good ones will get work, bad ones won't.

    Unions don't really apply to trades in the same way here.
     
  5. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #5
    So there are no trade apprentice, journeyman training qualifications that are overseen by unions? Is this a case where government sets the standards, you work for an employer gaining experience, and then go take a test? Hopefully, I’m not perceived as projecting judgement. I’m just curious. :)
     
  6. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #6
    I always assumed that any tradesman (or woman) worth the name had to do a proper, supervised apprenticeship, under a qualified master, that usually lasted a few years at least, any of the people I know personally who work in these fields, had to do something of the sort.
     
  7. Apple fanboy macrumors Nehalem

    Apple fanboy

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #7
    Not that I'm aware of. When you book a plumber or plasterer you never ask about qualifications.
    Unions have little to no power here. They used to more back in the 80's. I realise things are a bit different in the US. When I did some trade shows there, I was told you don't just get to pick up an electric drill to make a hole if you need one. That's what we would do here and nobody would worry about it.
    --- Post Merged, Feb 11, 2018 ---
    I think there isn't much checking these days.
     
  8. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #8
    Well, any of the guys I have used have been through the proper training; my dad knew some of them - our plumber started working with us when he was an apprentice (we were customers of his master) and we inherited him after his master retired.

    Likewise, any electrician or carpenter we use - is legit, trained, and recommended by people who are qualified and whom we, ourselves, know (either as people we grew up with, neighbours, or those whom we ourselves have already had work for us).
     
  9. Apple fanboy macrumors Nehalem

    Apple fanboy

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2012
    Location:
    Behind the Lens, UK
    #9
    Oh agree I always get a recommendation when you can. Not always easy though if you live 200 miles from where you grew up.
    If you can't get a personal recommendation then there are many sites you can use, (rate my builder, check a trade etc).
     
  10. velocityg4 macrumors 601

    velocityg4

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2004
    Location:
    Georgia
    #10
    Looking at the rules I can find about the UK. Besides requiring basic courses in Math and Science you'd get in High School. Or whatever your equivalent is. You can work directly as an apprentice under someone properly licensed if you are at least 19. If under 19 you would need some sort of trade school first. At least for working as an electrician.

    In the US you don't have to work for a union for any of this. At least not in any states I've ever looked at. Many unions offer these certifications. Depending on the state. It may be difficult to find anything non-union. In others there aren't many union options.

    You can work for anyone who is properly licensed. Then you can get your own license. Based on each states individual licensing requirements for each trade. Generally, you can take classes in lieu of on the job experience. Although you still have to have real world experience. The classes can replace part of the experience requirement.

    Unless you know nothing about construction and can't get a job. It makes more sense to just go the direct experience route. Working for someone you get paid to learn. Going to school you pay to learn and depending on the state can take longer. In Georgia for example. 1 Year of school equals 1/2 year on the job. So, you could have made $25K working that year. Rather than paying out $30K. A net loss of $55K for 1/2 the earned experience. If you're clever, work hard, keep fit, stay sober and always try to learn and improve. Your wages will quickly go up. Getting workers like that is difficult.

    College makes sense if you are going more towards the engineering side of construction and want supervisory roles in large projects. Such as a degree in Civil Engineering or Construction Management. I'd imagine trade school would also make sense if you want to work as a big equipment operator. Especially cranes.

    Unfortunately all these individual state rules means you can't just take your license from one state to another. Some have reciprocity agreements. Others you'll have to obtain a license again. Although I'm not aware of any state where your experience in one state won't count towards your experience in another.
     
  11. Huntn macrumors P6

    Huntn

    Joined:
    May 5, 2008
    Location:
    The Misty Mountains
    #11
    That’s interesting because I picture the UK to be more of a socialized country than the US, so I assumed unions would be more prevalent. Unions are about training, safety, quality of life issues, and workers rights. So if my premise about the UK being more socialized is correct, this would indicate no correlation with socialization and unions. Maybe the UK system provides the worker protection that unions historically have provided in the States. Btw, I am talking about being treated fairly, not unreasonable worker protection.
     

Share This Page

10 February 10, 2018