UPS for the MacPro

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by zoran, Oct 12, 2009.

  1. zoran macrumors 68030

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    Jun 30, 2005
    #1
    Is there some specific UPS recommended for the line of MacPros?
    If not, what UPS should i be looking for?
     
  2. gr8tfly macrumors 603

    gr8tfly

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    #2
    I use APC, myself. I have a "pro" model for my server, and 4 other "consumer" style models around the house. OS-X has basic functionality built-in for the USB models.
     
  3. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

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    #3
    what specs should i be looking for in order to set it for a Mpro? any special features that might come in handy?
     
  4. gr8tfly macrumors 603

    gr8tfly

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    #4
    The main thing would be how much up-time you need (w/hr). APC has an online "calculator" to help establish your requirements. Otherwise, there's number of UPS outlets; but I can't think of much else. If it has USB connectivity, they'd all be the same.
     
  5. nanofrog macrumors G4

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    May 6, 2008
    #5
    That calculator can over-estimate what you need though. I'd go with a 1500VA unit. The consumer versions, sold as the BackUPS line (BR1500LCD) would produce 865W, and should provide ~25 min. or so of battery time on a base model DP. Perhaps a bit more on a Quad, but it does have a little higher draw (higher TDP for a single CPU as well). It would be just fine for what the OP needs. :)
     
  6. gr8tfly macrumors 603

    gr8tfly

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    #6
    Yea, it's just a starting point. Being APC's own calculation, it's a bit of a conflict of interest recommending UPSs (no wonder it's high ;) ).
     
  7. nanofrog macrumors G4

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    May 6, 2008
    #7
    Exactly. :D

    Hmm... C2Q system... Use the calculator.... Answer = 4kVA! (imaginary number, but you get the point). :eek: :p
     
  8. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

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    #8
    I dont really care to use a ups for working off the power line, mostly i need it to protect me from power surges and of course have a limited time to work off power in order to safelly shutdown the MPro!
     
  9. nanofrog macrumors G4

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    May 6, 2008
    #9
    They protect you from brown-outs (low voltage conditions) more than surges by a substantial margin. Brown-outs can cause damage to the system as well, and is more responsible for DOA systems.

    As it happens, as you go up in VA ratings, the protection for both the surge capacity increases along with battery time. And if you're paranoid about surges, you can use a decent surge suppressor off the wall, then plug the UPS into the surge suppressor.

    Also note, that as time passes, the batteries will weaken, and not provide as much time to shut the system down. That's why you should get more time than you think you need. At least 2x IMO, and why a 20 - 25 min. estimate off new batteries is a good point to be at. Eventually they go bad (3 - 5 years), and require replacement or a new UPS. The batteries are less expensive than a new unit, and by enough you will notice.
     
  10. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

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    #10
    i see, thanx for the help, btw what is a surge suppressor? and why should i place it before the UPS? cant the UPS alone take care of its self, why does it need a surge suppressor?


     
  11. gr8tfly macrumors 603

    gr8tfly

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    #11
    Yes, the UPS has surge protection built-in.
     
  12. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

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    #12
    so then why would i need a surge suppressor?
     
  13. eawmp1 macrumors 601

    eawmp1

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    #13
    Read the post - the answer is there.
     
  14. zoran thread starter macrumors 68030

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    Jun 30, 2005
    #14
    ok i did read it, but i dont see how can one be paranoid about surges if he is covered with the protection the ups offers!
    btw can someone recommend me any surge suppressors so i can really see what they look like and their specs?
     
  15. nanofrog macrumors G4

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    May 6, 2008
    #15
    I used paranoid, as the suppression levels do vary between models. So if you live in an area that has a higher incedence of lightning strikes on power lines (i.e. areas where the power lines are the tallest structures for lightning to hit combined with lots of thunderstorms), or just want a higher amount, then there's the possiblity of adding additional suppression.

    I live in such an area. In my case, I had a good unused surge suppressor lying around (Isotel 8 Ultra), and I needed a new UPS not too long ago. So I decided to add it. So no added expenses. It was more of "why not", given the thunderstorm frequency in the area.

    Hence the suggestion of adding a separate surge suppressor before the UPS (it can help save it as well). Otherwise, if it's enough to keep a user happy (and they usually have some sort of insurance policy for equipment damage if it does get "killed"), then don't bother.

    Some people may just be willing to spend a little extra for the additional peace of mind, or like in my case, it's already in hand. ;)

    You can look at the units offered by APC, or better yet, TrippLite, as they're a separate manufacturer (pay attention to the Isobar/Isotel lines).

    Check the specs on the UPS/s you're interested in, and compare it to a good suppressor. I'd expect something approaching the 3000 joule mark for anything worth having. If it exceeds it, great. The issue can come into both physical space and cost. They may not have enough room to use enough MOV's (what the suppressors use) or the cost is too high to meet the target per unit. So the suppression level may be lower than you'd want.

    In the end, it's up to you. As mentioned, a UPS usually comes with a type of equipment damage policy (insurance that's included with the purchase).
     

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