Vista x7 versions

RobHague

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jul 8, 2005
397
0
Has anyone seen this? Windows Vista is going to have seven versions. :eek: :eek:

Windows Vista Ultimate Edition - Like that ;) reminds me of that Flash animation going around the web at one point, Windows Really Good Edtion :D

Two days before the start of Professional Developers Conference (PDC) 2005, I've received exclusive insider information about the product editions, or SKUs, which Microsoft intends to create for Windows Vista (codenamed Longhorn). While the exact breakdown of the Windows Vista editions has been the subject of much speculation, this list closely matches the editions list I first published on the SuperSite for Windows last year. Here's how the Windows Vista product editions break down.

There will be two general categories of Windows Vista editions, which map closely to the two that exist today for XP ("Home," which comprises Starter, Home, and Media Center Editions, Pro, which includes Professional, Professional x64, and Tablet PC Editions). In Windows Vista, the two categories are Home and Business. In the Home category, Microsoft will create four product editions: Windows Vista Starter Edition, Windows Vista Home Basic Edition, Windows Vista Home Premium Edition, and Windows Vista Ultimate Edition (previously known as "Uber" Edition). In the Business category, there will are three editions: Windows Vista Small Business Edition, Windows Vista Professional Edition, and Windows Vista Enterprise Edition. In all, there are 7 product editions planned for Windows Vista

Here's how the product editions will break down:

Windows Vista Starter Edition: Aimed at beginner computer users in emerging markets who can only afford a low cost PC. As with the XP version, Windows Vista Starter Edition is a subset of Home Edition, and will ship in a 32-bit version only (no 64-bit x64 version). Starter Edition will allow only three applications (and/or three windows) to run simultaneously, will provide Internet connectivity but not incoming network communications, and will not provide for logon passwords or Fast User Switching (FUS). Windows Vista Starter Edition is analogous to XP Starter Edition. This version will only be sold in emerging markets.

Windows Vista Home Basic Edition: A simple version of Windows Vista that is aimed at single PC homes. Windows Vista Home Basic is the baseline version of Windows Vista, and the version that all other product editions will build from. It will include features such as Windows Firewall, Windows Security Center, secure wireless networking, parental controls, anti-spam/anti-virus/anti-spyware functionality, network map, Windows Search, the Aero user interface, Movie Maker, Photo Library, Windows Media Player, Outlook Express with RSS support, P2P Messenger, and more. Windows Vista Home Basic Edition is roughly analogous to Windows XP Home Edition. This version is aimed at general consumers, Windows 9x/XP Starter Edition upgraders, and price sensitive/first-time buyers.

Windows Vista Home Premium Edition: Whole home entertainment and personal productivity throughout the home and on the go. As a true superset of Home Basic, Windows Vista Home Premium Edition will include everything from Home Basic, as well as Media Center and Media Center Extender functionality (including Cable Card support), DVD video authoring and HDTV support, DVD ripping support (yes, you read that right), Tablet PC functionality, Mobility Center and other mobility and presentation features, auxiliary display support, P2P ad-hoc meeting capabilities, Wi-Fi auto-config and roaming, unified parental controls that work over multiple PCs, backup to network functionality, Internet File Sharing, Offline Folders, PC-to-PC sync, Sync Manager, and support for Quattro Home Server. Windows Vista Premium Edition is similar to XP Media Center Edition, except that it adds numerous other features and functionality, including Tablet PC support. My guess is that this will be the volume consumer offering in the Windows Vista timeframe (today, XP Pro is the dominant seller). This version is aimed at PC enthusiasts, multiple-PC homes, homes with kids, and notebook users.

Windows Vista Professional Edition: A powerful, reliable and secure OS for businesses of all sizes. Windows Vista Pro Edition will include domain join and management functionality, compatibility with non-Microsoft networking protocols (Netware, SNMP, etc.), Remote Desktop, IIS Web server, and Encrypted File System (EFS). Additionally, Pro Standard will include Tablet PC functionality. Windows Vista Pro is roughly analogous to XP Pro today. This version is aimed at business decision makers and IT managers and generalists.

Windows Vista Small Business Edition: Designed for small businesses without IT staff. Small Business Edition is a superset of Vista Pro Standard Edition, and includes the following unique features: Backup and Shadow Copy support, Castle and server-join networking, and PC fax and scanning utility. Additionally, Microsoft is looking at including a number of other features, many of which might be cut: These include Small Business Edition guided tour, pre-paid access to the Windows Live! Small Business or Microsoft Office Live! subscription services, Multi-PC Health (a managed version of Microsoft One Care Live), and membership in the Microsoft Small Business Club online service. Microsoft will offer a Step-Up program for Small Business Edition that will allow customers to upgrade to Windows Vista Enterprise Edition (see below) or Windows Vista Ultimate Edition (see below) at a reduced cost. This SKU is new to Windows Vista; there is no XP Small Business Edition. This version is aimed at small business owners and managers.

Windows Vista Enterprise Edition: Optimized for the enterprise, this version will be a true superset of Windows Vista Pro Edition. It will also include unique features such as Virtual PC, the multi-language user interface (MUI), and the Secure Startup/full volume encryption security technologies ("Cornerstone"). There is no analogous XP version for this product. This version is aimed at business decision makers, IT managers and decision makers, and information workers/general business users.

Windows Vista Ultimate Edition: The best operating system ever offered for a personal PC, optimized for the individual. Windows Vista Ultimate Edition is a superset of both Vista Home Premium and Vista Pro Edition, so it includes all of the features of both of those product versions, plus adds Game Performance Tweaker with integrated gaming experiences, a Podcast creation utility (under consideration, may be cut from product), and online "Club" services (exclusive access to music, movies, services and preferred customer care) and other offerings (also under consideration, may be cut from product). Microsoft is still investigating how to position its most impressive Windows release yet, and is looking into offering Ultimate Edition owners such services as extended A1 subscriptions, free music downloads, free movie downloads, Online Spotlight and entertainment software, preferred product support, and custom themes. There is nothing like Vista Ultimate Edition today. This version is aimed at high-end PC users and technology influencers, gamers, digital media enthusiasts, and students.

According to internal Microsoft documentation, the goal of the product edition differentiations in Windows Vista is to provide "clear value proposition" to all customer segments and take XP-era innovations, such as the Media Center and Tablet PC functionality, to the mainstream. Windows Vista is also being positioned as a transitionary product for the x64 platform: Almost all Windows Vista editions will be offered in both x86 (32-bit) and x64 (64-bit) versions. Microsoft expects to transition almost completely to x64 post-Vista.

I'll be expanding on this information in a showcase for the SuperSite for Windows, which you can expect to see on Monday. In the meantime, I wanted to get this information out as quickly as possible.

http://www.windowsitpro.com/Article/ArticleID/47665/47665.html
 

iindigo

macrumors 6502a
Jul 22, 2002
719
10
San Francisco, CA
Oh that's really smart M$, confuse your consumers even more than they are now. Really smart.

Another reason to use OS X: With the exception of the server version, OS X is pretty much one-size-fits-all.
 

neocell

macrumors 65816
May 23, 2005
1,073
2
Great White North
I hate company products like this. In the end you'll end up buying one, it works for you for a month or so, then you try something new that you'd really like to do with your computer and find out it's not supported.
How can M$ marketing department support this. As iindigo said it's just going to confuse people even more.
Heads up their a**es
 

0098386

Suspended
Jan 18, 2005
21,574
2,909
wow, how pathetic. its like how they released that "XP for 3rd world countries" which was a severly cut down, but cheap !$@£%! (see how excited i am!?) version of windows XP which had almost no software included and could only have 3 windows open at any one point. y'know, its the THIRD WORLD. why would they want to use Windows? wouldn't they be more interested in such minor things as living? -_- stupid M$

so. 7 versions. smashing. not to forget the extra 7 versions without Media Player that we'll see a year or 2 down the line.

im at the point now where i cannot see why anybody would support M$, in ANY of their products. barring maybe their mice.
 

jamdr

macrumors 6502a
Jul 20, 2003
659
0
Bay Area
I wonder what the price range is going to be. Probably for a lot of users the high-end "ultimate" editions will be out of the question because they will be $$$$ (knowing MS).
 

After G

macrumors 68000
Aug 27, 2003
1,583
1
California
The need to make different editions of Vista to make it easier to use for Home users shows an inherent design flaw in the OS.

The existence of different versions in an OS is indicative of MS' desire to make people pay for each feature they use. I think this might be a step toward "renting" your OS.

This kind of crap from Microsoft makes me sick to my stomach.
 

Mac_Freak

macrumors 6502a
Apr 22, 2005
713
0
greatdevourer said:
Hmm... "Windows Exploited Edition"? "Windows Go-Buy-Another-Computer Edition"?
LOL :) It is going to easier for consumers to pick other OS/platform than to pick which version of Vista to buy. :D
 

dubbz

macrumors 68020
Sep 3, 2003
2,284
0
Alta, Norway
Heh, love that Starter Edition too.

They don't seriously believe that anyone will use them? It will be replaced by a cracked, non-crippled, Vista edition as soon as is technically/humanly possible.

I do wonder if they've made Vista modular enough to actually *remove* all that functionality, or if all this can be overcome by a single Registry edit.
 

greatdevourer

macrumors 68000
Aug 5, 2005
1,996
0
dubbz said:
Heh, love that Starter Edition too.

They don't seriously believe that anyone will use them? It will be replaced by a cracked, non-crippled, Vista edition as soon as is technically/humanly possible.

I do wonder if they've made Vista modular enough to actually *remove* all that functionality, or if all this can be overcome by a single Registry edit.
Regedit = the Winblowz MasterSword (play more LoZ if you don't know what I'm on about). I can't see many people opting for Starter Edition, either.

Btw, what's with the hats on avatars?
 

dubbz

macrumors 68020
Sep 3, 2003
2,284
0
Alta, Norway
Mac_Freak said:
I don't know if any one has posted this pic before or not but here it is what we can expect from Vista. Take a closer look.
Doubt it. They'll just continue their "automatically-reboot-before-user-see-bsod" scheme. Increased stability isn't the only reason why people see less BSOD's in XP ;)
 

Sun Baked

macrumors G5
May 19, 2002
14,859
57
Wonder how many of the features are going to time out and give you the standard "free trial period for this feature is over, please call to upgrade your OS" and/or "sorry, please upgrade to xxx to run this file" :rolleyes:
 

mkrishnan

Moderator emeritus
Jan 9, 2004
29,776
12
Grand Rapids, MI, USA
Sun Baked said:
Wonder how many of the features are going to time out and give you the standard "free trial period for this feature is over, please call to upgrade your OS" and/or "sorry, please upgrade to xxx to run this file" :rolleyes:
Well, I guess that will depend on whether Quicktime comes pre-installed on those Vista machines! ;) :eek: :D

Seriously, I think that MS is treading a dangerous line with users actually buying new computers and not getting functionality because they don't have the right variant of Vista (or XP for that matter). Although, with all the DVR kind of Media Center features, it isn't quite true at present that they are considered part of a core OS by most users.

But I still think it would be better for MS if they could structure it so that users could purchase an upgrade from one version of Vista to another online, and download and install the additional components without re-installing the OS from scratch, than to have users sort of stuck with the OS variant they get.
 

RobHague

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Jul 8, 2005
397
0
Hmmm, the back of software box's is going to get a bit more crowded...

System Requirements: Microsoft Windows Vista: Home, Home Premium, Pro, Small Business, Enterprise and Ultimate Edition.
I'm sure there are going to be some really fun conversations in stores on its release too!

Customer: "A copy Windows Vista please my good man."
Retailer: "Will that be Home, Home Premium, Pro, Small Business, Enterprise or Ultimate?"
Customer: <blink> "A copy of Windows Vista please."
Retailer: "But which one? There are different flavours available..."
Customer: "Ok - So give me a Vista with everything on it."
Retailer: "Enterprise or Ultimate?"
Customer: "Isnt there an Ultimate Enterprise?"
Retailer: "No. Just Enterprise or Ultimate. Or the other five versions."
Customer: "So is Ultimate better than Enterprise?"
Retailer "Not really. Its just different."
Customer: "So its not Ultimate then?"
Retailer "I guess not. Enterprise is for Enterprises. You want Ultimate."
Customer: "Ok then. How well will this work on my Celeron 333 with 512mb of RAM btw?"
Retailer: <dies>
 

Steven1621

macrumors 6502a
Apr 10, 2003
796
0
Connecticut
With all the smart people at M$, I can't comprehend how they could do something this stupid. Granted, I have no knowledge of what the real business world is like as I am a college student, but still. Do they sit down and think, "How can we make this as confusing and difficult as possible for consumers?"
 

mkrishnan

Moderator emeritus
Jan 9, 2004
29,776
12
Grand Rapids, MI, USA
Customer: "A copy Windows Vista please my good man."
Hah, well anyone who uses the expression, "my good man," should be able to communicate any additional necessary information to the salesperson through the slight tipping of his bowler, a piercing glance, and perhaps a nudge and a wink if really necessary, although those are rightly considered pedestrian and vulgar gestures. :D
 

Lacero

macrumors 604
Jan 20, 2005
6,639
2
All this confusion just makes me want to go back to DOS with DoubleSpace.
 

Tahko

macrumors regular
Jun 11, 2005
223
0
Finnland
God, microsoft is stupid with their windows "solution"!

It's the developing that takes money, not pressing the dvd's vista comes on. so, now they have wasted money to develop 7 different kinds of vista, while they could have gone all the way with ultimate! what's the damn point in crippling their os that has been developed for so long? I fail to see the logic.
 

StarbucksSam

macrumors 65816
Nov 21, 2004
1,427
0
Washington, D.C.
I can't wait to see how many people purchase a lower edition, try to do something unsupported, and then claim they have a "virus" and that their computer is "broken".
 
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