Wanna be UK'er

Salasm

macrumors regular
Original poster
Feb 1, 2006
165
0
surrounded by mods
Anybody know of any websites that provide American words or sayings translated into their UK equivalents?

I know there's quite a few UK mac members here after lurking for quite some time, and I always find some of the UK terminologies interesting.

What are some common UK phrases?
 

UKnjb

macrumors 6502a
May 23, 2005
717
0
London, UK
'ere yer are, guv'. Not the best maybe, but a bit of a start. An' good luck to yer - yer and yer fine lady, if she's there. :)

Linky
 

Black&Tan

macrumors 6502a
Mar 4, 2004
736
0
I never liked the English equivalent of cigarette - a fag. After being raised in the US, I can't separate the derogatory nature of the word. Disquieting.

The English equivalent of eraser always produced a smile - a rubber.

Then there's snog and shag, referring to relations between consenting adults.
 

XIII

macrumors 68040
Aug 15, 2004
3,450
0
England
Black&Tan said:
I never liked the English equivalent of cigarette - a fag. After being raised in the US, I can't separate the derogatory nature of the word. Disquieting.

The English equivalent of eraser always produced a smile - a rubber.

Then there's snog and shag, referring to relations between consenting adults.
It's just funny how you guys don't use those words. :)
 

Black&Tan

macrumors 6502a
Mar 4, 2004
736
0
More...

Spot of tea luv = cup of tea
Brolly = umbrella
Bumbershoot = umbrella
Ta = thanks
Cheers = thanks
Washing up liquid = dishwashing detergent
Sultana = raisins (I really like this one)'
Uni = university
Boot = trunk
Jumper = sweater
Qeue = line
Tube = underground, subway
 

UKnjb

macrumors 6502a
May 23, 2005
717
0
London, UK
Never mind the word "bush"

In the US, I understand it means a President. Over here, well it is ..... :eek:
 

Black&Tan

macrumors 6502a
Mar 4, 2004
736
0
After understanding what a shag was, I always thought it was funny that we have shag carpets.

Hmmm...alternate meaning? I wonder....

:D

UKnjb said:
Never mind the word "bush"

In the US, I understand it means a President. Over here, well it is ..... :eek:
It can also mean the same thing over here. We also have the phrase, "beat the bushes" meaning to look for something.
 

Black&Tan

macrumors 6502a
Mar 4, 2004
736
0
Kernow said:
I always thought these were different things - sultana=dried white grape, raisin=dried red grape. :confused:
Maybe. I didn't know there was a difference. I remember seeing Sultana Bran in the grocery store in Preston, but here in the US, its referred to as Raisin Bran.

Here's another website I have in my bookmarks...

http://english2american.com/
 

bumpy

macrumors newbie
May 19, 2006
14
0
That's due to the richness of british slang, we have an amazing amount of words for anythng rude. Where as the Eskimos have 200 words for snow, we have 200 words for masturbation. :D

Just shows what's most important to a nation.
 

skunk

macrumors G4
Jun 29, 2002
11,744
4,143
Republic of Ukistan
quigleybc said:
What's the origin of the "guv'ner" or Guv, that i hear a lot? Bart Simpson would say that when mimicking a British accent...
Governor, the person who governs you, foreman, boss or simply your social better...
There's a touch of irony in there, too, as in country people addressing strangers as "squire".
Both terms to be accompanied by a tip of the hat or, if short of a hat, a tug of the forelock.
 

x86

macrumors regular
May 25, 2006
166
0
Dearborn, MI
quigleybc said:
What's the origin of the "guv'ner" or Guv, that i hear a lot? Bart Simpson would say that when mimicking a British accent...
I'm curious about that as well. I first heard it while playing Dragon Quest on my PS2...
 

Peterkro

macrumors 68020
Aug 17, 2004
2,149
1,382
Communard de Londres,Tiocfaidh ár lá
Was it Oscar Wilde is was it George Bernard Shaw I'm :confused: now my memory doesn't work too well anymore.Mind you they were both Irish so offer a independent view.

I think I need a lie down I was thinking of " two nations separated by a common language"
 

Jaffa Cake

macrumors Core
Aug 1, 2004
19,802
6
The City of Culture, Englandshire
quigleybc said:
What's the origin of the "guv'ner" or Guv, that i hear a lot? Bart Simpson would say that when mimicking a British accent...
It's just a way of saying 'governor' – someone in charge, or in a position of authority. Generally, you might say it in an effort to show a bit of respect, guv.

EDIT: Me ol' mucker skunk got in there first, I see. *tugs forlock by way of deference*