Watch bands: Two pieces?

lunaoso

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 22, 2012
1,331
50
Boston, MA
I was thinking about the bands, and they'll have to be two pieces correct? One connects on one side, the other connects on the other, and they aren't linked in the middle, as that's where the clasp is. So they must be two separate pieces. This seems like an annoyance, just because if you lose one half, you can't use it anymore (I know, I know, be responsible, but not everyone is). Just an interesting thought I had, something that didn't occur to me at first.
 

Julien

macrumors G4
Jun 30, 2007
11,140
3,829
Atlanta
Someone should have spent 30 seconds looking at the Apple site instead of a minute posting. :eek:



 

Seannyb

macrumors member
Sep 26, 2012
98
2
Oregon
I was thinking about the bands, and they'll have to be two pieces correct? One connects on one side, the other connects on the other, and they aren't linked in the middle, as that's where the clasp is. So they must be two separate pieces. This seems like an annoyance, just because if you lose one half, you can't use it anymore (I know, I know, be responsible, but not everyone is). Just an interesting thought I had, something that didn't occur to me at first.
This is nothing new when it comes to watch bands. If you are that worried about losing part of the strap when its not on the watch, hook the two straps together and you have one strap :eek:
 

lunaoso

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 22, 2012
1,331
50
Boston, MA
Someone should have spent 30 seconds looking at the Apple site instead of a minute posting. :eek:

Image

Image
If you took the band out of the apple watch (to switch it out with another one), it'd be in two pieces. Obviously it has to clasp or it wouldn't have anyway of staying on your wrist ;).

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This is nothing new when it comes to watch bands. If you are that worried about losing part of the strap when its not on the watch, hook the two straps together and you have one strap :eek:
I'm not worried about losing them, I just thought it was interesting. I mean I'm not really a watch guy anyway (this will be my first "expensive" watch), so it was just something I didn't think of until I looked at pictures.
 

ksuyen

macrumors 6502a
Jun 26, 2012
772
141
This gives an idea of 2 different colour band. Unless you really into faux pas, maybe not really a good idea.
 

Night Spring

macrumors G5
Jul 17, 2008
13,064
5,084
I think the link bracelet would be one piece. But other than that, all bands are two pieces. And yeah, as a previous poster said, to prevent losing just one piece, hook them up together when they are not on the watch. Of course, this is true of traditional watch bands, but the issue didn't really come up because most people didn't change watch bands frequently.
 

lunaoso

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 22, 2012
1,331
50
Boston, MA
This gives an idea of 2 different colour band. Unless you really into faux pas, maybe not really a good idea.
I thought of that as well, but the clasps are different for each type, but you could theoretically mix and match in between the band categories: for example a black and white sport band together.

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I think the link bracelet would be one piece. But other than that, all bands are two pieces. And yeah, as a previous poster said, to prevent losing just one piece, hook them up together when they are not on the watch. Of course, this is true of traditional watch bands, but the issue didn't really come up because most people didn't change watch bands frequently.
Yes that makes sense, just the way the clasp works, it would be.

For some I'm just pointing out the obvious, but others such as myself may not who don't deal with watches often may not have thought of this right away. As apple is really pushing the customization factor it seems like, I'm just curious to hear other peoples' opinion on this.
 

Lennyvalentin

macrumors 65816
Apr 25, 2011
1,429
739
So they must be two separate pieces. This seems like an annoyance, just because if you lose one half, you can't use it anymore
How exactly is this different from any other watch band? :p Also, the link bracelet, leather loop and the milanese band are for all intents and purposes single units. And if you're worried about losing half of your watch strap, for the love of grud, don't take the band off of your watch! Jesus! ;)
 

lunaoso

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 22, 2012
1,331
50
Boston, MA
How exactly is this different from any other watch band? :p Also, the link bracelet, leather loop and the milanese band are for all intents and purposes single units. And if you're worried about losing half of your watch strap, for the love of grud, don't take the band off of your watch! Jesus! ;)
I'm not a watch wearer, so I'm not used to/aware of the whole two piece aspect. I'm not worried about losing them, but I could see a lot of everyday people losing them. I dunno, I just thought it may be something people would be interested in discussing. I guess I was wrong. :p
 

Night Spring

macrumors G5
Jul 17, 2008
13,064
5,084
I thought of that as well, but the clasps are different for each type, but you could theoretically mix and match in between the band categories: for example a black and white sport band together.
I might try that. Not interested in an all white band, but a black and white band might be cool, like you are wearing a Yin-Yang bracelet.
 

Lennyvalentin

macrumors 65816
Apr 25, 2011
1,429
739
I'm not a watch wearer, so I'm not used to/aware of the whole two piece aspect.
If you pick up almost any random watch, you'll find they almost all have bands that are two separate pieces fitted with a pair of metal pins to the casing of the watch. Rarely the band is one single piece that goes underneath the watch. The band can also be moulded to the watch itself, and not be removeable at all. This is sometimes the case with certain sports/exercise watches for example; makes it easier to keep them clean I suppose.
 

8CoreWhore

macrumors 68020
Jan 17, 2008
2,252
332
Big D
I feel the same way about shoes. :p

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This is nothing new when it comes to watch bands. If you are that worried about losing part of the strap when its not on the watch, hook the two straps together and you have one strap :eek:
Yeah, but, then you'll lose the whole Watch.:D
 

lunaoso

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 22, 2012
1,331
50
Boston, MA
If you pick up almost any random watch, you'll find they almost all have bands that are two separate pieces fitted with a pair of metal pins to the casing of the watch. Rarely the band is one single piece that goes underneath the watch. The band can also be moulded to the watch itself, and not be removeable at all. This is sometimes the case with certain sports/exercise watches for example; makes it easier to keep them clean I suppose.
I guess that's true. I've just never noticed it, as I don't normally wear watches.
 

Night Spring

macrumors G5
Jul 17, 2008
13,064
5,084
Lol! Even though I have my own washing machine, I swear that thing eats the occasional sock! Always just ONE sock though, making me end up with an odd one out of a pair...
I hate that too. I finally got laundry nets to wash the socks in. No more lost socks! :D
 

dacreativeguy

macrumors 68020
Jan 27, 2007
2,014
210
I was thinking about the bands, and they'll have to be two pieces correct? One connects on one side, the other connects on the other, and they aren't linked in the middle, as that's where the clasp is. So they must be two separate pieces. This seems like an annoyance, just because if you lose one half, you can't use it anymore (I know, I know, be responsible, but not everyone is). Just an interesting thought I had, something that didn't occur to me at first.
You must have been the kid wearing the mittens with the string connecting them up your sleeves.
 

Night Spring

macrumors G5
Jul 17, 2008
13,064
5,084
So hook the two pieces together so you can lose both of them instead of one piece and you'll have no choice but to convert the Apple Watch into a pocket watch.
Haha.

Realistically, I think most people will keep one band on the watch at all times. But considering Apple is stressing the bands being swappable, and many people plan to buy multiple bands, what to do with the bands when they are not being used is a valid concern. Most women are used to keeping track of their accessories (necklaces, ear rings, and whatnot), and men who use cuff links and tie pins also must have storage places for little objects like that. But I imagine there would be lots of people for whom having to keep track of a small object like the extra watch band is a totally new experience.
 

kdarling

macrumors P6
This thread is amusing to people who've worn watches all their life.

Yet I dare say that most people rarely change their bands except to replace a broken one.

So the OP has a point: how DO you store Apple Watch bands?

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Now, with regular watchbands (and I have a few since I usually replace rubber smartwatch bands with leather right away), I use plastic sleeves and/or rubber bands to keep pairs together.

However, I see an instant market about to arise for an Apple Watch band holder of some sort. Wood with lined compartments, maybe. Or a metal jewelry rack with places to "slide and click" your unused bands into.

Or even just a "joiner" piece that you can click both ends into, to hold them together.

Quick: someone go into business NOW! I'll only take 5%. Thanks :)
 

Arran

macrumors 601
Mar 7, 2008
4,353
2,725
Atlanta, USA
Just make sure you lose both pieces at once. Problem solved.

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Or even just a "joiner" piece that you can click both ends into, to hold them together.
I like that idea, but introducing a third piece to misplace is not helping the OP. :D
 

lunaoso

macrumors 65816
Original poster
Sep 22, 2012
1,331
50
Boston, MA
Just for clarification, I myself am not worried at all about losing them. I just think that we're entering new territory with a single watch that is expected to be worn by millions, with tons of different band options, we could see this become an issue. I hadn't heard anyone talk about it before so I figured I'd bring it up. The apple watch is going to be bringing in thousands of previous non-"watch wearers", such as myself, who were ignorant to this fact beforehand. I think that's what's most interesting about the apple watch, it's attacking an industry by not only getting watch wearers to switch to it, but giving everyone else a reason to wear a watch.
 

Night Spring

macrumors G5
Jul 17, 2008
13,064
5,084
Just for clarification, I myself am not worried at all about losing them. I just think that we're entering new territory with a single watch that is expected to be worn by millions, with tons of different band options, we could see this become an issue. I hadn't heard anyone talk about it before so I figured I'd bring it up. The apple watch is going to be bringing in thousands of previous non-"watch wearers", such as myself, who were ignorant to this fact beforehand. I think that's what's most interesting about the apple watch, it's attacking an industry by not only getting watch wearers to switch to it, but giving everyone else a reason to wear a watch.
At least you don't have to wind the Apple watch -- you just need to pop it onto the charger. Although I liked winding watches, I found it relaxing to wind it once a day. And I think Im really dating myself, lol.

But it is interesting to hear from the perspective of someone who's never worn a watch. And like you say, Apple watch will "convert" many previous non-watch wearers. As well as bringing back to the fold ex-watch wearers like myself, who strayed when the iPhone came out. :p
 

Seannyb

macrumors member
Sep 26, 2012
98
2
Oregon
How exactly is this different from any other watch band? :p Also, the link bracelet, leather loop and the milanese band are for all intents and purposes single units. And if you're worried about losing half of your watch strap, for the love of grud, don't take the band off of your watch! Jesus! ;)
Agreed :) However, it looks like the Leather Loop will be a 2 piece band. One side is short with a metal loop for the other, longer band to thread through and close magnetically onto itself.