What Book Are You Reading?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Huntn, Jan 14, 2011.

  1. RootBeerMan macrumors 6502a

    RootBeerMan

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2016
    #6351
    Umm..The woman on the cover is Wonder Woman. She's wearing the costume her character has always worn. And the older version of Superman on the cover is pretty much who he's always been.
    --- Post Merged, Dec 21, 2018 ---
    Currently reading R. Buckminster Fuller's "Operating Manual For Spaceship Earth". Looking forward to seeing how this work holds up after all these decades.

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  2. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #6352
    Never knew what WonderWoman looked like, and never saw anything she featured in.

    And, okay, so that is the older version of SuperMan; well, I do know who he is, but never saw the movie (movies?) or was remotely acquainted with the franchise.

    Each to their own.
     
  3. balezi macrumors newbie

    balezi

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2018
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    United Kingdom
    #6353
    Atomic Habits by James Clear.

    Amazing how much of our lives are governed by habits, without us even realising it. Reading the book has helped me develop a couple of new, positive habits.
     
  4. SandboxGeneral Moderator emeritus

    SandboxGeneral

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    #6354
    Book: On Writing: A Memoir of the Craft
    Author: Stephen King
    This book, a paperback version, arrived in my mailbox just a couple of hours ago and I tore into the plastic teal and white packaging to get to the book as quickly as I could. I've been looking forward to receiving it all day so that I could start a new book, this book. I'm not a fast reader, but I've been reading it since I opened the package and have just now stopped to take a bathroom break and stretch my legs a bit. It's a page-turner for me already and I don't even know the page number I'm on because I'm not even looking at them.

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  5. yaxomoxay macrumors 68030

    yaxomoxay

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    #6355
    It's a great book!
     
  6. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

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    #6356
    That looks very interesting. I just downloaded a sample to my Kindle.
     
  7. Gutwrench Contributor

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #6357
    A Memoir of the Craft sounds interesting.

    I have a couple similar books by Mary Oliver. It’s fascinating reading an artist’s perspective on their craft.

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  8. Dave Meadows macrumors 68040

    Dave Meadows

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2010
    #6358
    I loved this book. Extremely insightful into how he crafts his work. Some say Dickens's "drones" on a bit but is beautifully written. I'd say the same of King. He can write a couple of pages without the story progressing but the language he uses is (to this Brit) fascinating.
     
  9. Matz Contributor

    Matz

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    Location:
    Rural Southern Virginia
    #6359
    “Sackett’s Land” by Louis L’Amour.

    Second in the Sackett series. A pretty good read, so far.
     
  10. LizKat macrumors 601

    LizKat

    Joined:
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    #6360
    Not books at the moment... I recently got onto a kick of reading (or re-reading) some of the long reads in archives of The New Yorker by the remarkable Burkhard Bilger. The guy is an empathetic and engrossing writer on so many different and well researched topics, and his profiles on various individuals or team endeavors have also been fascinating -- anything from Mars explorations through deep caving adventures to the hunt for heirloom Mexican beans, with stops along the way to delve into the particular obsessions about time and consciousness of a neuroscientist, and the (sustainable) featherwork of a fashion designer. Plus a hard look at what it's like to discover that one's grandparent was at one point a Nazi party chief in the Vichy government in Alsace and then abruptly an ardent worker in the French resistance...

    Here's the bio from The New Yorker about him. I read somewhere that in his long tenure there he's only had one piece rejected. Having read a lot of his stuff now, I am not surprised:

    Burkhard Bilger published his first piece in The New Yorker in 2000 and became a staff writer the following year. His work has been anthologized three times in “Best American Science and Nature Writing,” twice in “Best American Sports Writing,” and once each in “Best Food Writing,” “Best Technology Writing,” and “Best American Science Writing.” Bilger was a senior editor at Discover from 1999 to 2005. Before that, he worked as a writer and a deputy editor for The Sciences, where his work helped earn two National Magazine Awards and six nominations. In 2000, he published “Noodling for Flatheads: Moonshine, Monster Catfish, and Other Southern Comforts,” which was a finalist for the PEN/Martha Albrand Award. Bilger is a Branford Fellow at Yale University.​


     
  11. ThisBougieLife macrumors 68000

    ThisBougieLife

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    #6361
    ^Ah, so it was Bilger who wrote the article on Rancho Gordo. That was one of those articles that upon first glance didn't seem too interesting to me, but after reading that article, I ordered some of those heirloom beans myself!
     
  12. LizKat macrumors 601

    LizKat

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    #6362
    Yep, that was Bilger's. He also wrote that piece "The Possibilian" about David Eagleman, the neuroscientist. That one, in a section about human perception of time passing, caught my eye because of the references to U2 drummer Larry Mullen Jr.'s extraordinary ability to sense truly minuscule lags in the proper assembly of elements in a music track's production, stuff on the order of two to six milliseconds.

    Really he's the kind of writer that can make me read about stuff I'll probably never read about again in that level of detail but can't put down once I've started in on it. I haven't burned a saucepan yet because of him, but only because I've got the sense to not start in on one of his pieces before supper "while the water's coming to a boil..."
     
  13. MarkB786 macrumors 6502a

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    Rocky Mountains, USA
    #6363
    Radical Candor - Kim Scott. Makes you think more strategically about your daily interactions with employees.
     
  14. rhett7660 macrumors G4

    rhett7660

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    Sunny, Southern California
    #6364
    What a great book. I have read it a few times now, once all the way through and then back through passages I have found helpful. I have it listed in this thread also! Good stuff!
    --- Post Merged, Dec 24, 2018 ---
    This isn't based on the movie, however the outfits/costumes have been around since the inception of the characters. The movies didn't come out till the 1980's while the tv show was much earlier.

    You might find the history of Wonder Woman fascinating, especially when you learn the how and why she was created.
     
  15. Huntn, Dec 28, 2018
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2018

    Huntn thread starter macrumors P6

    Huntn

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    #6366
    Finished The Wizard of Oz. My impression was that the book was very popular when written, through the 1930’s when the movie was made. The book had elements that the movie left out, with a creative setting and characters, but the author was not very good describing conflict and action. That just about every event was described so plainly, it lacked excitement, at least from my perspective.

    Example, attacked by wolves? One by one chop their heads off. Where in reality a pack of 40 vicious wolves should have torn their party to pieces without some strategy employed by Dorithy and her friends. Without any fanfare, throw water on the witch, problem solved. Giant spider? No problem, jump on it’s back while it is sleeping and swipe it’s head off.

    The genius of the movie besides making it a musical, was consolidating, adding complex story elements that added depth and focusing on Dorothy’s conflict at home before the tornado, her family relationships, and the conflict between Dorothy and the Witch, that starts before the tornado arrives, the witch’s desire for her sister’s magic shoes from the beginning of arriving in Oz, harraasing and attacking them on their way to The Emerald City. The movie climax, exploding with suspense is when the party is about to be destroyed, surrounded by Winkies (yes, Winkies :)), the witch catches the scarecrow on fire, and by accident, Dorothy destroys her. In comparison, the book has many opportunities for suspense, that are squandered by the author’s simplistic narrative.

    I don’t insist that you agree with me. :)

    Next book: Dragon Teeth, a posthumously published Michael Crichton novel, about a conflict between fossil hunters in the US West in the late 1800s.
     
  16. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #6367
    But, @Huntn, the whole point with fiction is that the creatures you introduce from our world to a fantasy world do not necessarily have to always behave quite as they do in our world; this other world may have different rules which govern animal behaviour.

    I read the book as a child and thrilled to it.
     
  17. Huntn thread starter macrumors P6

    Huntn

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    #6368
    I never had the opportunity to read it as a child, just my adult impression, with the recognition it was written a long time ago, not to imply old is bad. There are many classic books that impress me. It's possible that children books written at the start of the 20th century were much more simpler than they are today. For myself, the movie has made a huge impact on me and runs circles around the book, but I have no issue with your opinion about it. All is well. :)
     
  18. cdcastillo macrumors 6502a

    cdcastillo

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    Dec 22, 2007
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    The cesspit of civilization
    #6369
    Currently reading a ghost stories anthology and Semiosis. Both highly entertaining and thrilling.

    The anthology includes works from Dickens, Kipling, Le Fanu, Bécquer, Bierce and Wilde.
     

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  19. Dave Meadows macrumors 68040

    Dave Meadows

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    Nov 10, 2010
    #6370
    Reading"Life" by Keith Richards. Colourful and entertaining as you can imagine.
     
  20. RootBeerMan macrumors 6502a

    RootBeerMan

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    Jan 3, 2016
    #6371
    Just finished up the "Autumnlands Vol.2: Woodland Creatures" graphic novel. A fantastic continuation of Volume 1. Great story and good artwork. If you like far future post-holocaust fantasy/SF then you'll like this series!

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    Now, it's back to the new Harry Turtledove novel, "Through Darkest Europe: A Novel". So far this has been a very good alternate history novel where the Muslim Renaissance never ended and Thomas Aquinas was a hardcore, Christian jihadist. Europe is a rather backwards place and many of the Aquinists are jihadists of the worst sort (think ISIL). So far it has been a really good read, as is to be expected of Turtledove.

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  21. Dave Meadows macrumors 68040

    Dave Meadows

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    Nov 10, 2010
    #6372
    Finished "Erebus" by Micheal Palin. It was just OK. Although the ship achieved incredible journey's (there were basically two epic journeys) there is only so much that can be written about them. I found myself getting bored in parts and found it over long.

    There was nothing particularly political in the story (so no world events to associate with) so it really is the story of a ship that travelled to the antarctic and later the arctic, and has recently been found at the Botton of the sea.

    I don't want to put anyone off as others might find the story more interesting, this is just my assessment of it.
     
  22. SandboxGeneral Moderator emeritus

    SandboxGeneral

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    #6373
    Halfway through Star Trek Discovery: Drastic Measures which features a cameo by young, teenage James Tiberius Kirk.
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  23. Zenithal macrumors 603

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    Sep 10, 2009
    #6374
    Hmm, I'll side with @Huntn here. There are some works of fiction that are very popular that I've never enjoyed and never got the point of even after reading them upwards of twenty times in my lifetime. I won't drop any titles, but some of them are very popular and others are part of the literary canon.
     
  24. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #6375
    Why not mention any titles?

    For example, I loathe and detest "The Da Vinci Code", and the baffling popularity of this banal, clichéd, poorly-written (and historically execrable) novel has never ceased to astound me.
     

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