What camera is similar to the d200 that will not break my bank too entirely?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by CapturedByMikayla, May 15, 2019.

  1. CapturedByMikayla macrumors newbie

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    May 15, 2019
    #1
    I have used a Nikon d200 for the passed year and a half for my photography business, and I have loved it! But I wanted the higher megapixels of a newer one so I bought a Nikon d5100, and I don’t like it very much. I like the bigger body of my d200, and the fact that it was easier for me to access all of the settings I needed to change during a shoot. What camera is similar to the d200 that will not break my bank too entirely?!
     
  2. tizeye macrumors 6502

    tizeye

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    Orlando, FL
    #2
    Probably your best bet, staying with DX lens is the D7500. Unless you have accumulated FX lens, then consider the shift to full frame. Suggest renting a D7500 for a weekend or job as hysically larger, not close in price.
     
  3. CapturedByMikayla thread starter macrumors newbie

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  4. mollyc macrumors 68000

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  5. CapturedByMikayla thread starter macrumors newbie

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    May 15, 2019
    #5
    I like to buy used, so preferably under $400 for a used Camera body.
     
  6. deep diver macrumors 65816

    deep diver

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    #6
    Your FX lenses will still work on a DX body but with different effective focal lengths. You should be able to find an older D700 or D7000 series body in your price range.
     
  7. tizeye macrumors 6502

    tizeye

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    #7
    On my iPhone so not going to check used prices at KEH or B&H but several years since switched from Nikon to Sony, but as I recall the D600 was least expensive full frame and improved with D610 in what should have been a firmware upgrade, so consider the 610. Alternately, stay crop sensor like bothe the d200 and d5600 with the 7000 series. Historically, I almost went with the D200 or d70, but started with the D40. Foe reference, the D40/d60 morphed into the D3000/D5000 series. The larger D90 morphed into the D7000 series. While each model series has more features, the 7000 series is probably closest to the D200 in size and features. Also, be aware no factory warranty with used or second owner of even current models.
     
  8. mofunk macrumors 68020

    mofunk

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    Americas
    #8
    I would go with the D7000 series. The body has more pro features than the D5100. I remember shooting with a D5??? in low light and it was hunting to focus. Even with a prime lens it took longer to focus on the subject. The D7100/D7200 I have to say is a nice step up from the D90. You get more control with video shooting and better focusing.

    X2 with looking for a used body on KEH.com B&H or Adorama A buddy of mine got the D7200 from B&H and it looks pretty good. You can pair it with a nice prime lens or one of the kit lenses.
     
  9. tizeye macrumors 6502

    tizeye

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    #9
    It must be a newer FX lens with AF-S if it auto-focuses on the D5300. The D3000/D5000 series require a lens with the focus motor in them (AF-S) to auto-focus, where the D7000 series have camera based auto-focusing for those older FX AF lens that use a screw drive to auto-focus rather than the lens based internal motor. The D7000 series works with both focusing systems. Not certain, but also believe the 3000/5000 series had issues/limitations with off camera flash triggering and HDR was manual single shot adjustment if either of those are important to you.

    $400 budget used. While tight to meet, a couple of issues. As you state have a photography business, if in the US, any equipment purchase is tax deductible against profits, and how many shoots would it take to make up the difference when exceeding $400? Assuming keeping the D200 as a second body, but if selling don't know if those projected proceeds are included in the $400 budget. With new bodies typically on sale, and used not, the price spread shrinks to perhaps one photoshoot. Looked at B&H for general reference pricing (didn't check KEH or Adorama), and while full frame is tempting, would recommend the D7000 series if you don't need full frame. Actually, at times I wish I had a crop sensor with wildlife and sports photography.

    FULL FRAME: (lower numbers are older models)
    D610 - ($1497 new), $599 (grade 8), $689 (grade 8+), $759 (grade 9)
    D750 - ($1297 new on sale), $972 (grade 9), $907 (grade 8+)

    Avoid the D600 (and SB900 flash) as had issues resolved by Nikon issuing the D610 rather than firmware resolution. Did the same with the overheating/shutdown SB900 flash, issuing the SB910 rather than firmware resolution of the problem. The D610 was actually my last Nikon and was looking at upgrading to the D750 vs jumping to Sony.

    CROP SENSOR: (lower numbers are older models)
    D7500 ($796 on sale new, $749 refurb), none used
    D7200 (unavailable new) $565 (grade 9) $612 (grade 10)
    D7100 ($696 new) $399 (grade 8), $439 (grade 9) $469 (grade 9+) $499 (grade 10)
    D7000 (no longer sold new) $299 (grade 8), $339 (grade 8+), $369 (grade 9), $389 (grade 9+)

    The D7000 was my last before upgrading to the D610

    That's a start. Each site (B&H, KEH and Adorama) will define what their condition grading scales are and any warranty they issue on used. Also DP review will have a review of each of the cameras in their database, and as part of the review will reference difference from model replacing. That may help you when trying to decide between models in the same series
     
  10. mofunk macrumors 68020

    mofunk

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    Aug 26, 2009
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    Americas
    #10
    You know I have problems with my D750 and SB600. I ran into several photogs that have the same set up and the same problems with the same SB600 Flash.

    Sometimes I will go to DPreview.com and other times I like to check out Gordon Langs because he will compare previous and vs competition

    https://www.cameralabs.com/nikon-d7200-review/4/

    I was helping a friend with buying under a budget. I gave the option of D7200 and two lenses. They chose a Grade 8+ from B&H. I was surprised how well it looked especially next to my D750. You couldn't even tell which was the newer body. My vote is D7200 if you are on a tight budget.

    I like the full frame if you are shooting a large group. Sports its not too bad.
     
  11. Apple fanboy macrumors Nehalem

    Apple fanboy

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    Behind the Lens, UK
    #11
    I’d not worry about SB900’s overheating.
    My three have always been fine.
    --- Post Merged, May 22, 2019 ---
    My D7100 is still a good back up to my D750. I enjoy the extra reach with the 200-500mm.
     
  12. iluvmacs99 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2019
    #12
    For your $400 budget, it would either be a used Nikon D300s or a used Nikon D700. The Nikon D300s is a DX camera body that has all the pro features of the D200 and was the successor to the D300 and D200 before the Nikon D500 took its place. It has a pretty good sensor and is still quite competitive in terms of providing good dynamic range and noise performance. The D300s has a 12MP sensor, about 2 MP more than the D200. Another great model to consider is the D700, which is the FX version of the D300s, though not considered a sports model to the Nikon D3 eventhough it shares the same full frame sensor. The Nikon D700 is still relevant today because of its D3 sensor which was, at the time, revolutionary for its low light performance. Though no longer the best low light full frame today, you can still buy it for $400 is amazing. The problem with the FX camera is that, if you have DX lenses then you would be shooting at a 1.5x crop of the 12MP. The Nikon D7xxx series are not professional models compared to the D300 series and while it has a lot more MP than the D300s, it is more money. The question is, why do you need more MP than 10 or 12MP? I used to work in the pro field for 3 decades and I found 12-16MP to be quite enough for pro work as long as you know what you are doing. You can print huge enlargements from a 12-16MP file. The only reason I would use a higher MP is when I need to crop or need to print bigger than 30x40" prints. But if you're a working pro, you would rely mostly in using the right lenses to physical crop the image on site. If you keep cropping your images in Photoshop, it just means that your photographic skills need more improvement -- training your eyes to see the final image not rely too heavily on Photoshop which I saw a lot of younger and newer photographers do. It's as though they shoot sloppy in the field and say, I can fix all that in Photoshop. It should be; do most of your work with your camera and lens and then only use Photoshop to do minor fixes -- not major fixes.
     
  13. mofunk macrumors 68020

    mofunk

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    Location:
    Americas
    #13
    The D7xxx series are semi-pro DSLR and are as good as the D300/D300s. What you lack in the D300 is an on board flash and the ability to shoot in Auto mode lol. The D90s/D80s/D70s/D7000s/D750s are nice midpoint to the D300s/700s/D800s. All the other stuff is valid except for the Pro-reference. The best camera to have is the one you are shooting with (you get what I'm saying) lol I've actually have several big prints with my D90.

    D300 I would agree that it's a nice camera especially in low light. However since the D750 and a few of the D7000series that have the 51-AFP They would fair better and you could get one for around the same price plus video options. Size is not really a factor when you can add a battery pack if you want that bulkiness. Both bodies are around the same size...The D800 is bigger. The D300 is like a few cm taller but heavier. If you put any of the prosumer DSLR (D750/D7000series) next to a D700 or D300, the Prosumers are bigger. The Prosumer are weather sealed and have just as many customization as a Pro camera. 2 SD Slots. Better Battery life (my favorite feature especially when shooting all day).
     
  14. kallisti macrumors 65816

    kallisti

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2003
    #14
    Out of curiosity, aside from the ergonomics did you notice a difference in the files between the D200 and the D5100? Differences that would influence your ability to sell the images?

    Since you are using the camera for business, how is the D200 (which you obviously like) limiting your business? What is it not able to do (either feature wise or image quality wise) that is making you feel the need to upgrade to a different body?

    There are some good suggestions above, but the more basic question is: you already have a camera body that you like and are comfortable using. Larger files might be important for your work and the new camera (regardless of price) might pay for itself. On the other hand, with your proposed budget it sounds like any expenditure (if it really isn't necessary in the sense of helping you make money) would be something to be avoided.

    So again, do you see the larger files from the D5100 (16.2MP vs your current 10.2MP) as something that will help you generate more income? Would 24MP help you generate more income? 48MP?

    Are there other differences in newer bodies (low light ability, AF speed/accuracy, FPS, better dynamic range, etc.) that are important enough for your specific type of work that will financially justify getting a newer body?

    There are obviously scenarios where all of the above might be true. But there are also uses where it really wouldn't matter. Nothing wrong with "wanting" something newer. But if your budget is tight it's important to at least entertain the question as to whether you really *need* a different body for what you are shooting.

    In any event, I would suggest renting some form of upgrade to give you a sense of whether it makes sense (either now or in the future) to change bodies. Depending on how robust your photography business is, you might find that a body upgrade makes financial sense (perhaps even by spending more than your current budget). On the other hand you may discover that your D200 is good enough for your needs.
     
  15. mofunk macrumors 68020

    mofunk

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    Americas
    #15
    I scrolled back to OP post and reread what was posted. Bigger body like D200 that allows you to change settings on the fly oh and use FX lenses. D5100 has limitations on all that. Sure you can change them using the Menu screen but that would waste the battery plus its not the bigger body style. When I'm shooting with my D750 I can change settings without diving into the menu screen. The only time I would go into the menu is to turn on the wifi.

    If you are shooting for a business or professionally you want something where you can change settings on the fly and focuses fast. D5100 definitely doesn't focus as fast as the other cameras suggested.

    I remember looking through the D5100 menu screen. idk how limited it was compared to the Midrange and Pro cameras. From what I remember the Pro cameras gives you more settings to adjust especially with using a flash.
     
  16. Garyphotos24 macrumors newbie

    Garyphotos24

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    #16
    I have Nikon D7500 camera and it is amazing, truly one of the kind camera with amazing performance, and if you pair it up with quality lens it can take some amazing looking photos.
     
  17. Apple fanboy macrumors Nehalem

    Apple fanboy

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    #17
    Doesn’t match your avatar!
     
  18. bunnspecial macrumors 604

    bunnspecial

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    Location:
    Kentucky
    #18
    FWIW, the D300(s) does have a built-in flash.

    In any case, I'd be looking VERY strongly at either a D7100 or D7200. The D7200 might be a stretch at the $400 price mentioned, but with a bit of hunting can probably be found. You'll still find a lot of discussion/argument over whether the D7200 is worth the extra money over the D7100-I think both have the same sensor.

    Although I've never owned either, if I were in the market for another crop camera right now I'd give then D7200 a very, very strong look-I actually like it better than the D7500 in a lot of ways.

    Re: Full frame-I have a D700, and really like it for specific uses. Among other things, the sensor performs quite well up to ISO 6400. With that said, I'd have a hard time suggesting it for any other use other than "full frame at the lowest possible cost." The resolution bump from a D200 is small enough to be insignificant, although there again the high ISO improvement is significant. The minimum I'd consider in an FX body is a D600/D610, which is doable for around $600. This loses the build quality of the D200/D300/D700/D800, but the image quality is there and the sensor, in my experience, is still quite good even at ~3200.
     

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17 May 15, 2019