What causes Safari to use so much memory?

Discussion in 'macOS Sierra (10.12)' started by jerwin, Jan 18, 2017.

  1. jerwin macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2015
    #1
    my Safari Networking process is consuming somewhere on the order of 50-60 Gigabytes, and it's starting to slow down my machine.
     
  2. casperes1996 macrumors 65816

    casperes1996

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2014
    Location:
    Horsens, Denmark
    #2
    Sounds like a corrupted preference file.
    Try this

    With the Finder app active
    cmd+shift+g
    "~/Library/"
    Find Safari and move the folder somewhere else
    Reopen Safari

    The browser will be entirely cleared. All browser history, auto-fill info, extensions etc. will be removed (if you need it back just put the folder back). If this solves the issue, there's something the browser was keeping that was messing with it.
     
  3. KALLT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    #3
    Have you restarted Safari? Sometimes a complete quit without restoring windows (command–option–Q) may help resolve issues.
     
  4. jerwin thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2015
    #4
    Well, yes, I restarted Safari eventually, and SafariNetworking crawled back down to (checks) 48 MB I'm wondering if the reading list could contribute this periodic instability.
     
  5. KALLT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    #5
    I am not using the reading list, but with currently 14 tabs opened, Safari Networking uses 16 MB uncompressed memory or 47 MB ‘real memory’.
     
  6. yep-sure macrumors 6502

    yep-sure

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2012
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #6
    I don't use the Reading List, but my Safari is usually using about 2.5GB of memory with about 10-12 tabs open. It makes the whole thing run dog slow, I usually have to close and re-open Safari a few times a day to get the memory usage back down and the application usable,

    This problem is exclusive to Sierra for me, as are most other problems I've been experiencing.
     
  7. jerwin thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2015
    #7
    I use the reading list extensively, and quite often end up with about 40-50 tabs in multiple windows, all told. I've never taken "clean desktop" policies very seriously.

    (The Safari Networking process manages "top sites" iirc. It may also be used with the reading list.)
     
  8. casperes1996 macrumors 65816

    casperes1996

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2014
    Location:
    Horsens, Denmark
    #8
    Do you have problems on multiple machines? Have you reformatted the drive and reinstalled the OS?
     
  9. yep-sure macrumors 6502

    yep-sure

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2012
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #9
    I don't own multiple machines.

    And no I haven't reformatted. I've mentioned it in other posts, but I 'd hoped that when I switched to OSX from Windows way back when, that my days of formatting to fix poor performance in operating systems was over. With all the problems Sierra has brought it seems like that dream is now over (although while the sharp decline in quality really started with Yosemite, it still didn't require a complete reformat, just a downgrade) I don't have the time to go through all that at the moment, so for now I'll continue to complain about the Sierra problems I have on MacRumours.
     
  10. KALLT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    #10
    Safari Networking is basically the process that handles all the network access in Safari. Each website is loaded through it and the raw data is then handed to separate Safari Web Content processes that render the data, which themselves have no network access (for security reasons). It could really be anything. I don’t think Safari Networking is supposed to persist a lot of data. Are you using any media plugins or are loading video/audio?
     
  11. casperes1996 macrumors 65816

    casperes1996

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2014
    Location:
    Horsens, Denmark
    #11
    All systems can get corruptions and reformatting is good practice every once in a while no matter what OS you run. Is it less often necessary on macOS? Yes. Has it ever been totally pointless to do? No
     

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