iPhone 11 What happens if I charge my phone with power inverter?

zedmark97

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 21, 2019
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Here's the thing, for some reason, I may drive frequently for two months. If I use the power inverter to charge my phone in two months, will the phone battery be affected?
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Deifie

macrumors newbie
Apr 6, 2016
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It is very inefficient to charge this way as you first step up your 12V from the car to 110V, then the power supply will change the voltage back down to 5V.
For the phone battery there is no difference to other charging methods, as the phone won´t be connected directly to the inverter.
 
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vertical smile

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Sep 23, 2014
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If I use the power inverter to charge my phone in two months, will the phone battery be affected?
You should be fine with this set up, but I would suggest getting a 12VDC to USB adapter as someone already mentioned, using an inverter is really inefficient.

12VDC to USB adapters can be sold for less than $10 in the US.

Power is power.
Well, I wouldn't say that power is power for all devices.

There are some things that do not work well or could be damaged with power supplied from a modified sine wave inverter.

But you are correct when talking about charging an iPhone.
 

zedmark97

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 21, 2019
18
2
So, you guys mean that it's not good to charge my phone with it, right? What about using the inverter to charge my laptop? Is it better to use a sine wave power inverter? (In my car)
 

DarkSorrow82

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Aug 26, 2016
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Burlington, WI
Should be fine. I had an inline 1000w/2000w peak inverter directly to my car battery which had 2 plugs and 2 USB plugs. I charged my iPhone XS and a Alienware Laptop with that for over a year while driving with no issues.
 
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maerz001

macrumors 65816
Nov 2, 2010
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So, you guys mean that it's not good to charge my phone with it, right? What about using the inverter to charge my laptop? Is it better to use a sine wave power inverter? (In my car)
It doesn’t harm anything. Just wasted energy.
thats why we recommend cheap usb charger for your cigarette lighter port.
regarding laptop no idea
 
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BugeyeSTI

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Aug 19, 2017
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So, you guys mean that it's not good to charge my phone with it, right? What about using the inverter to charge my laptop? Is it better to use a sine wave power inverter? (In my car)
No, everyone is saying you CAN charge your phone or laptop using the inverter with no issues...
 
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PinkyMacGodess

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Mar 7, 2007
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No, everyone is saying you CAN charge your phone or laptop using the inverter with no issues...
What people are saying is it's like buying milk, having it dried, and then adding water to the powder to make it liquid milk again.

The vehicle puts out DC voltage, the inverter converts DC to AC. The power adapter for the iPhone changes AC to DC. Going up to AC, and back to DC is just a road you don't need to travel. Save the inverter for something that can only work with AC voltage. If you have a MacBook Pro that charges with USB-C, you can even charge that through a lighter to USB-C adapter. (Charging a MacBook Pro won't necessarily charge as fast as plugging it in to a wall outlet, but it will charge.)

If you were to stick to the inverter, use Apple power adapters as they won't pass garbage power so readily to whatever is plugged in to it.
 
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BugeyeSTI

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What people are saying is it's like buying milk, having it dried, and then adding water to the powder to make it liquid milk again.

The vehicle puts out DC voltage, the inverter converts DC to AC. The power adapter for the iPhone changes AC to DC. Going up to AC, and back to DC is just a road you don't need to travel. Save the inverter for something that can only work with AC voltage. If you have a MacBook Pro that charges with USB-C, you can even charge that through a lighter to USB-C adapter. (Charging a MacBook Pro won't necessarily charge as fast as plugging it in to a wall outlet, but it will charge.)

If you were to stick to the inverter, use Apple power adapters as they won't pass garbage power so readily to whatever is plugged in to it.
You charge your phone using the plug in your house right? That's AC power, then your adapter converts it to DC. Same thing... If you want to argue that turning DC power to AC and then back to DC is somehow bad for your device please list your sources...
 

PinkyMacGodess

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You charge your phone using the plug in your house right? That's AC power, then your adapter converts it to DC. Same thing...
True, but the OP was trying to use an inverter in a car. Never mind...

Inverters are notorious for wasting power. I have a factory inverter in my car, and they say to not use it for 'long periods'. They don't say what a 'long period' is, but the inverter does (supposedly) have a temperature sensr, and will shutdown if it gets too hot. I've never had to use it so I have no clue if it actually works. There are so many things now that are battery driven, the need for an inverter is probably a lot less than it was when the car was engineered/made. *shrug*
 

steelhauler34

macrumors member
Jul 23, 2019
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The little cube your usb charging cord plugs into outputs a certain current no matter what it’s plugged into. Doesn’t matter but the little cigarette lighter adapter is way cheaper than an inverter and less bulky.
 

HEK

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Sep 24, 2013
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Semi drivers use multiple inverters all the time to power their fridges, Tv, Microwaves and such. Works fine for them to.
There are really good inverters that put out a correct sign wave. They cost more. And cheap inverters can be fine for some applications like heating coils.

You most likely will be fine using it. Especially if you use an Apple power adapter, as they have good filters built in. But as a number of people have stated it is a convoluted inefficient way to charge.
 

BugeyeSTI

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Aug 19, 2017
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Cheap inverters put out a modified sign wave with truncated spikes or flat spots in the current output. Electronic components tend not to like that as they were designed for true sine wave ac current that smoothly flows from positive to negative 60 times per second.

If you are really interested look it up, there are hundreds of articles. My sources are physics and electronic classes as well as articles you can just as easily look up. If not than don’t, makes no never mind to me. My fee for looking up things is $50 per hour, but will discount you by 10%.
I’m not interested in looking it up because I already know the answer. I run a high quality inverter in my off road rig and know it has performed exceptionally and has never damaged any device or product hooked up to it. You get what you pay for. If you use the right products you won’t have an issue. My post pointed out that going from D/C to A/C to D/C doesn’t cause any problems. If you use a cheap inverter then I wouldn’t argue problems could arise just like using a cheap charging brick. As far as paying to have sources listed it’s clearly stated in the forum rules that they shouldn’t have to be paid for...
 

BigMcGuire

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Jan 10, 2012
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vertical smile

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Sep 23, 2014
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My post pointed out that going from D/C to A/C to D/C doesn’t cause any problems.
I don't disagree with your post, but I don't remember seeing any post of the thread that going from DC to AC to DC would cause any problems with charging a laptop or phone.

I think about everyone agreed that it would be fine, although some pointed out that it would be inefficient when a 12VDC USB adapter would probably be more ideal.


But for the record, there are some electronics and devices that do not work well or could be damaged from using typical modified sine wave inverters, which the OP is using.

A lot of manufacturers will post of list of electronics that are not suitable for their modified sine wave inverters.

I run a high quality inverter in my off road rig and know it has performed exceptionally and has never damaged any device or product hooked up to it.
This would depend on whether it is a pure sine wave or modified sine wave and what electronics you are using with it.

If it is a high quality inverter, then it is most likely a pure sine wave inverter, so you wouldn't have a problem with it.
 
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zedmark97

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Nov 21, 2019
18
2
Should be fine. I had an inline 1000w/2000w peak inverter directly to my car battery which had 2 plugs and 2 USB plugs. I charged my iPhone XS and a Alienware Laptop with that for over a year while driving with no issues.
Thank you.
 

I7guy

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Nov 30, 2013
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maerz001

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Nov 2, 2010
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I was just talking about efficiency. If your motor isn‘t running or u have an EV car and just wanna charge your phone the cigarette USB adapter or already build in usb port is the way to go.

Side note: modern cars also disconnect the power generator when battery is full to save fuel. But i guess this isn’t the priority here