What is highest-capacity internal HD for 2007 Macbook Pro?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by dudleybrooks, May 7, 2011.

  1. dudleybrooks macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #1
    I have a 15" Macbook Pro purchased in 2007. On the Technical Specifications page on the Apple website I find listed what I assume are the speeds and capacities of the internal HD's available at that time *for purchase already installed in the machine*. I haven't been able to find information on what speeds and capacities the machine is *actually capable of supporting*, to know is the most powerful drive I can upgrade to. Thanks for any detailed info, pointers, or recommendations of specific drives (as well as any comments on the difficulties or dangers of replacing the drive).
     
  2. CJS7070 macrumors 6502a

    CJS7070

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #2
    I could be wrong, but there shouldn't be a set maximum, you should just be able to use any standard SATA notebook drive.
     
  3. thejadedmonkey macrumors 604

    thejadedmonkey

    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Location:
    Pa
    #3
    I threw a 320gb HDD in my 2006 MBP, but when I was looking I didn't find any max. Just make sure it fits, I think you need a 9mm tall one, as opposed to a 10mm tall drive.
     
  4. gorskiegangsta macrumors 65816

    gorskiegangsta

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    Mar 13, 2011
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
  5. gnasher729 macrumors P6

    gnasher729

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    #5
    There is no upper limit for the size in GB. There is one limit which I don't know, whether that MacPro has enough space for a 12.5 mm high drive or only for a 9.5 mm high drive.

    The biggest 9.5 mm high drive you can buy today is 750 GB; the largest 12.5 mm high drive is 1 TB.
     
  6. dudleybrooks thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Location:
    San Francisco
    #6
    Speed (and other) worries?

    Thanks for everyone's response. Everyone is giving the answer I was hoping to hear -- virtually "no limit", except physical size (which, in fact, *is* 9mm). Still, before I spend the money, I'm worried, particularly about speed. Are there limits to how fast the Macbook can send data to the drive, that would force, say, a 5400rpm vs a 7200rpm? Any combination of speed and size that would be prohibitive? In the list of drives available at the time of purchase, the larger the drive, the slower the speed. Was that because of the technology of the *drives* available at the time, or was it some limitation in the Mac itself? And as far as size, any limitation in "addressing" the drive? (I don't know anything about the actual communication between the Mac and the drive, so my questions may be totally naive and off-the-wall.)
     
  7. Wafflausages macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2010
    #7
    Faster the RPM faster then read/write speed. The only thing limiting your macbook would be the hard drive. People usually get an SSD(fastest storage) for applications/os and use a hard drive for media/documents. You can see the difference of 5400rpm vs 7200rpm vs ssd by checking the boot times on youtube. If you want something in between SSD/HDD get the momentus xt a little more expensive than a harddrive but a lot cheaper than an SSD.
     

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