What is the naughiest thing you did as a child?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Reecedouglas1, May 11, 2017.

  1. Reecedouglas1 macrumors newbie

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    #1
    The naughiest thing I did was ring the police for no vaild reason , they rang back and my mum had to explain that I had pressed 999 for no reason.
     
  2. estabya macrumors 6502

    estabya

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    #2
    When I was 9/10 years old I was fascinated with electronics. I had taken apart an old cassette player to mess around with the internals. The motor worked great when hooked up to a 9V battery, so I thought it would probably work even better if I plugged it into the wall. I grabbed an extension cord, shoved some thin (24 gauge?) wire into the female ends, hooked them up to the motor, and plugged it into the wall.

    The thing I remember most vividly was the huge blue spark. Then I looked down and the carpet was on fire. I smothered it quickly, but there was still a ~6" charred circle. Luckily for me my parents weren't home at the time. I opened my bedroom windows and flipped the breaker back on before rearranging the furniture in my room to cover up the burned spot.

    This was ~20 years ago, and neither of my parents have asked me anything about it.
     
  3. arkitect macrumors 601

    arkitect

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    #3
    Oh, but they will… they will… they're just biding their time. The most inconvenient and embarrassing moment for you.
    Parents. Devious.

    :)
     
  4. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #4
    Indeed.

    I wasn't a naughty kid, I was polite and well-behaved and neat. Very serious, and very studious. I wanted to know things, why things happened, how they happened, how they worked, why they worked. History and the sciences fascinated me.

    So, while I wasn't naughty, I did ask questions - sharp questions, questing questions, and sometimes, for adults, these might have been difficult questions, and - for some - this was a lot worse than merely being naughty.
     
  5. heehee macrumors 68020

    heehee

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    #5
    I used to spend time at my aunts after school because my mom had to work. I remember one time I threw a temper tantrum and insist on going to watch my cousins shower. I was probably 5-6 at the time and I think they are 8 years older than I am.
     
  6. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

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    #6
    I got into plenty of trouble as a kid. I wouldn't say I was a bad child, just one that liked to "test the boundaries". That being said, I could write of numerous experiences growing up that would answer the question. One story would involve shooting a bow and arrow inside the house. There was the time I was brought home by railroad security after I was found playing on the top of moving trains in the train yard. Yes, in my community there was lots of opportunity for mischief. Many times my friends and I played hide and seek with security guards or adults from various properties and places of business including churches, government facilities, nature centers, local parks, etc. etc.. We pretty much had the run of the neighborhood in those days whether it be on bike, skateboard, or foot. I only ended up in the back of a police car once and they promptly let me go, probably due my charming personality. ;)

    Times sure have changed as my wife and I wouldn't even consider letting our kids "out and about" without supervision now.
     
  7. ActionableMango macrumors 604

    ActionableMango

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    #7
    This is why the new emergency services number is 0118 999 881 999 119 7253.
     
  8. Huntn, May 12, 2017
    Last edited: May 13, 2017

    Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #8
    For some reason, the Bad Seed popped into my head, with this thread title, which horrified me when I read the book. :( The following is disturbing so it's shielded. Don't read if violence against a baby upsets you.

    I read the book and saw the movie, but I can't remember exactly if this is the story where the girl, among other lethal things, kidnaps a baby and drowns it in a pickle barrel for the horrified adults to discover? I've looked up several synopsis and can't ID if this is the Bad Seed story. I know the book ends differently than the movie with a more satisfying ending.

    Daring! I fantasized about jumping on a moving train and taking a ride, but never did. When I was a kid, we ran all over the place unattended. This was the 1962 time frame, which would make me 9 at the time. In contrast we watched our kids like hawks. And I don't remember doing anything all that bad. :)
     
  9. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #9
    I can't say I did anything horrible, though at times like any normal boy, I was a bit mischievous. Left to my own devices meant that I would probably do something I ought not too. Nothing like breaking the law, so I guess from that perspective I was a pretty good kid.
     
  10. Scepticalscribe, May 13, 2017
    Last edited: May 13, 2017

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #10
    Great thread, and lovely thread title.

    Actually, reading it, I'm very struck by the number of comments which mention the joys and pure pleasure of unfettered free roaming childhoods. (And @mscriv, riding the tops of trains......allow me a moment's undisguised envy..)

    And yes, I had - and hugely enjoyed one of those, one, too, full of the untrammelled joys of roaming in parks, prowling in woods, exploring building sites, playing on beaches, building dens - I used to read in the dens of others, eyes on book, but ears tuned to the soft sound of summer rain falling heavily, but reassuringly outside and above us - completely unsupervised, and eventually trailing home for lunch, or the evening meal when hunger, tiredness and/or the clock called.

    And - I am equally struck by the remarks which follow - on the lines of watching your own kids "like hawks" - as both @mscriv and @Huntn have written.

    Is there such a thing as over-protectiveness, or how does one encourage a sense of adventure, of controlled risk, of encouraging a degree of physical independence, of understanding, mastering and applying the concept of "risk assessment", of wanting to test yourself - and test boundaries - without parental supervision?
     
  11. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #11
    It was like it was a different time. Acts of violence against children like abduction, rape, and murder seemed to be exceedingly rare if non-existent, although there were cases, the awareness had not seeped into the general consciousness or maybe a not in my town feeling.

    I remember around 10 years old, running all over the neighborhood with a young friend trick or treating and my parents did not give a second thought to it. I used to travel 3 city blocks across the large grounds of a senior citizen home, several fields, and into the woods to go exploring (this was in Washington DC, 1960ish) and even farther than that walking through different woods to go to swim lessons.

    Then there were some well publicized child abduction cases (1989 Minnesota, Jacob Wetterling) where I lived as a young parent, and then Amber alerts (public notification of missing children), subsequently sending children out by themselves evolved to practically being unheard of. That seems to continue to this day. This is not to say we were compelled to be in our son's presence continuously, but we did keep relatively close track of him as compared to when I was a kid.

    Drive by a school at closing time and there are a hundred cars waiting for their kids although this may partially be a status thing (my kid does not ride the bus!). And at the typical bus stops, there are parents waiting for the bus with their kids. Which of note, when we first put our son on a school buse, the very first time, that day, he did not walk off the bus when it came back through the neighborhood. Talk about anxious minutes. :) It turned out he had gotten on the wrong bus. They found him and it did not stop us from utilizing school transportation but we had a talk with him about it, not a scolding talk, but a concerned talk. :)
     
  12. arkitect, May 13, 2017
    Last edited: May 13, 2017

    arkitect macrumors 601

    arkitect

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    #12
    Ah well, in my school days acts of violence against children certainly were encouraged as part of your education.
    This was at an all boys school, 1970s.

    We were caned regularly.

    One memorable Monday morning after assembly we were all caned (Teachers at each exit armed with appropriate instruments). Reason? General lax discipline as perceived by headmaster, and just because he was severely pissed off that the 1st Rugby team had lost their away game the previous Saturday;

    The Latin teacher had this idea that the only way to drill conjugations and vocab into our teenage heads were by hitting it in via our bottoms;

    Our Algebra teacher was a genuine psychopath. One day he was so enraged at a very simple error that he physically picked up a boy still cowering inside his one piece desk (the ones that had ink wells and a fold up board) and tried to throw him out of a large sash window… We never knew if Jekyll or Hyde would turn up.

    My English teacher had Delirium tremens so bad he had to hold his left hand with his right hand to make a decent scribble of a signature against our homework. At least he wasn't violent.

    Biology teacher (thank god I had not anything to do with him) hit pupils with an inch thick plank, on which he made notches. He later committed suicide with a pupil when their affair turned sour;

    I sometimes think I went to the original Llanabba.

    Still, we actually did get a very decent education. It was definitely founded and run on the Mens sana in corpore sano principle. So lots of sports as well.
    And made friends, we helped one another through it.

    Heh ho… :)
     
  13. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #13
    Yes, I experienced corporal punishment too, but not regularly.

    Most of my education was in the public school system, but in 3rd grade (about 9 years old) my parents sent me to private school in downtown D.C. Another reference to me running all over the place, I used to leave our house in South East D.C., the Anacostia area, walk to the bus stop and then take the bus downtown all by my self. The school-Woodward Elementary, several blocks from the White House, if you were late the teacher would demand your presence in front of the class, and have you present your hand, so she could wack it with a 3 sided ruler multiple times.

    My impression is that Catholic school, they used to beat up their students too, but we sent our son to a Catholic school for one year and I don't remember corporal punishment being allowed, a redifinition of what was acceptable, and too many lawsuits at that point.

    I assume similiar changes took place where you live?

    In public school, the principle had a largish paddle with holes in it, but I never got paddled. I remember speculating what those holes were for, help it fly through the air faster, and/or inflict more pain? :)
     
  14. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    #14
    To hang it with in plain sight as a deterrent.
    --- Post Merged, May 13, 2017 ---
    I was quite naughty as a child. Nothing that bad.
    I did start the odd fire or two.
    Used to cut class quite a bit. Never liked school.
     
  15. ThisBougieLife macrumors 65816

    ThisBougieLife

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    #15
    I was not much of a troublemaker; I was quiet, shy, and nerdy as a kid, much as I am now. I was always good at following the rules and not getting into trouble (never got detention or any real trouble at school, same can't be said for my older sister). The main thing I did that would anger my parents was wait too long to clean my room (my mom would stand there and make me clean it, while I acted like I was performing slave labor) and fighting with my sisters (I've always gotten along well with both of them, but occasionally there'd be a scuffle and my parents hated that). Thankfully my parents never used corporal punishment on me or my sisters, even though both of them were corporally punished frequently as kids.

    I grew up in a house with a lot of land, acres of hillside property in Woodside, and I was given a pretty free reign of the undeveloped part of it. I remember once I discovered you could use a long sturdy piece of vine as a whip, and I went through a thickly-vegetated part of the yard and began whipping all the plants, cutting their leaves off and sending green flying into the air. It was so satisfying and fun to do that I got pretty carried away with it. Later it looked like a complete massacre of this part of the yard, as if someone had hacked away at it with a machete. Naturally my mom, ever the gardener, was furious. That was the only time I can recall really doing something destructive.

    Another naughty thing I did (I'm sure others have done something similar) is that I can distinctly remember "playing doctor" with the daughter of a family friend (she and I were both about 6 at the time). No one ever found out about that and it was only years later that I learned of the taboo surrounding it.
     
  16. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #16
    At 6, it's difficult for me to get too upset about that. :)
     
  17. Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

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    #17
    Oh boy, talk about discipline when I was a kid. No only did Dad disciplined me (ie, spanked with cane/switch/Belt™), but my Uncles and my friends Dad and Uncles too.:eek: Not only was this okay, it was expected.o_O:( I walked the straight and narrow as a kid.

    Dad was a big fan of the movie and book, Mutiny on the Bounty. The preamble to every spanking: "Discipline's the thing. A father's a father, an uncle's an uncle. You, my boy, are the lowest form of animal life in this family." I didn't get spanked too often. Being called "Mr Fletcher Christian" in a calm voice was the final warning; works every time.
     
  18. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #18
    Wow. Most of us understand the idea behind the saying, spare the rod and spoil the child. I last heard that mentioned in V for Vendetta (the movie).
     
  19. Gjwilly macrumors 68030

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    #19
    Those circular clothes racks in the department store where the hanging clothes form a big ring......
    I went through the clothes and hid in the center.
    My whole family was looking for me...
    The store staff was looking for me...
    The store security was looking for me...
    And I just stayed quiet thinking I was the best hide and seek player in the world.

    That was the "naughtiest" thing I ever did.
    I've done worse things since but those would have to be classified beyond just "naughty".
     
  20. ActionableMango macrumors 604

    ActionableMango

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    #20
    That perception is very common, but does not match reality. Violent crime is down significantly compared to when most parents today were kids: http://www.freerangekids.com/crime-statistics/

    I was a free range kid and walked miles in the woods all over.

    I get shocked today when my friend won't let her three kids play in their front yard. This is a house in an extremely safe city, in an extremely safe upper middle class neighborhood of that city, and with no traffic because its at the end of a cul-de-sac.
     
  21. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #21
    There is a mindset, it's not going to be my kid.
     
  22. Spink10 macrumors 601

    Spink10

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    #22
    Nevermind - ignore post :)
     
  23. ActionableMango macrumors 604

    ActionableMango

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    #23
    I'm not a parent myself, so I cannot judge.

    I just want to clear it up that the old days were not in fact safer. Far from it.
     
  24. Huntn macrumors G5

    Huntn

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    #24
    When I say old days , I mean really old days, like 50 years ago. :)
     
  25. Scepticalscribe, May 16, 2017
    Last edited: May 16, 2017

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #25
    Actually, they were and they weren't.

    Children were an awful lot freer - freer to explore, and freer to learn abut friendships - and to learn to be a little street wise and take responsibility for some of their own choices at a far younger age.

    I and my brothers cycled to school, cycled to the city (occasionally took buses), and were expected to make our own way there and home.

    In fact, some of the best friendships I made at school were not in the classroom, but when chatting to classmates after school, and sometimes cycling home with them (or they with me) whereupon you might meet a parent or two - who always liked to know who their kids were hanging out with.

    While I acknowledge the arguments for supervision and safety that some feel are necessary nowadays, I do have some concerns. You can teach children to be too afraid, rather than encouraging them to learn to negotiate the challenges of the world with prudence, common sense, wonder, joy, and an intelligent and finely honed and developed capacity for risk assessment. Fear shouldn't replace the excitement of adventure.

    One is that play - or 'free time' is too structured - class time is structured by definition, but kids need some unstructured time as well, and need to know that it is sometimes okay just to sit and think.

    Besides, kids need to be able to experience a bit of the chaos of untrammelled time and need to learn how to entertain themselves spontaneously.

    And secondly, these days, you have kids arriving at university who have never had to fend for themselves at any level, as they have been ferried form activity to activity, from school to school, and suddenly, at 18, they are supposed to be entirely responsible for their own lives.

    Kids need to learn to develop their own antennae, and to nurture their own sense of risk assessment.

    Towards the end of my time in the groves of academe, I certainly saw a huge increase in the 'emotional neediness' displayed by some students.

    Yes, a different time and different world.
     

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