What is/was for dinner?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Gutwrench, Aug 19, 2018.

  1. Ulenspiegel macrumors 68040

    Ulenspiegel

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    #1201
    It takes ages to open, unfortunately.
     
  2. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1202
    Thanks - patience is a virtue; it opened when I waited an age.

    So, it is made from excellent quality milk and nothing other than natural ingredients (Prunotto are the same; all of their ingredients - cherry, a little sugar, are recognisable English or Italian words, no strange chemical terms).

    Sounds delicious.
     
  3. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1203
    Cooked prawns, (served with homemade Marie Rose sauce), Italian potato salad (boiled organic potatoes dressed with olive oil, sherry vinegar, sea salt, black pepper, garlic, plenty of finely chopped parsley), and organic cherry tomato salad (tomatoes, with olive oil, parsley, sea salt, black pepper).

    Very tasty.
     
  4. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1204
    Pasta (orecchiette) with a sauce made from a base of finely diced carrot, onion, and garlic, pancetta and peas to which I added some double cream (organic) and plenty of freshly ground black pepper.
     
  5. Zenithal macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #1205
    Made this a while back. Omitted the peas for fresh spinach as I don't like the extra sweetness apart from the carrots. And used whole pork belly chopped and rendered instead of the pancetta. Dash of smoked paprika built up the flavor for the belly whilst not changing the color of the dish much. I suppose you could use steamed asparagus, chopped, or fiddleheads. Maybe even young ramps. Maybe a shaving or two of lemon rind for a citrus aroma and flavor. Possibly some finely chopped up lemon basil at the end to amp up the lemony flavor and take the edge off the richness of the cream.
     
  6. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1206
    Actually, I wanted the sweetness of peas as peas and bacon (any sort of bacon, ham, pancetta, your suggestion of pork belly, one recipe even mentioned pork cheek) marry beautifully in a dish, and complement one another exceptionally well.

    With cream, it becomes a soothing salty yet sweet dish. Black pepper supplied a little heat.

    Personally, I wouldn't use asparagus in that dish, as I tend to prefer it with fish, or a gentle salad - or sometimes, in something akin to a salad Nicoise, or a gentle poached chicken dish, or perhaps risotto.

    "Ramps?" What are they? Ramsons? In other words, young garlic?
     
  7. Zenithal macrumors G3

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    #1207
    That's the thing, I personally don't like salty sweet flavor combinations. Honestly, I'm trying to figure out what cold weather food to make tomorrow since I usually cook on Sundays. Cold, windy and rainy outside for days.

    Ramps are like a wild hippy child born out of wedlock of an onion, leek and scallion, but milder and delicious.
     
  8. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1208
    It took me years to be able to articulate that this is a combination of flavours that I really adore and have done so since childhood - that and sours.

    Thus, I love satay sauce, salted caramel (whereas I don't much care for standard caramel), short bread (which I always liked, whereas I dislike most standard biscuits), Parma ham & Iberico ham, I could eat them endlessly, and this is one of the main reasons I would never choose to become a vegetarian; as a child, one of the very few sweets (candies for Our Transatlantic Cousins) that I liked (apart from very dark chocolate - for I have always disliked milk chocolate) was butterscotch.
     
  9. RootBeerMan macrumors 65816

    RootBeerMan

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    #1209
  10. Scepticalscribe, May 19, 2019
    Last edited: May 19, 2019

    Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1210
    Preparing Hungarian fish gulyas (goulash).
    --- Post Merged, May 19, 2019 ---
    At the moment, the anchovies have melted into the olive oil and butter mixture.

    I have now added the diced onions, green pepper, and carrot (all organic); once they soften, garlic will be added (six or seven fat cloves); then, the paprika - both sweet smoked Spanish and actual Hungarian (which was bought for me in Ukraine), caraway seeds and the roasted tomatoes.

    After, stock and potatoes.

    Then, much later, the (white) fish shall be added.
     
  11. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1211
    My Hungarian fish soup was absolutely delicious, if I say so myself.

    The fact that I used genuine Hungarian paprika (in the considerable quantity recommended by various recipes) - and was likewise generous with the sweet, smoked paprika from Spain - may well have helped matters, but this tasted like the real version of the dish I have had.
     
  12. JamesMike macrumors demi-god

    JamesMike

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    Oregon
    #1212
    Having a T-bone steak with baked potato, bacon, and sour cream. Cooked the steak on the barbie to 125 degrees using pepper and salt. I chose a nice red wine from Napa Valley called Raymond Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon from 2016.
     
  13. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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  14. anika200 macrumors member

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    Feb 15, 2018
    Location:
    USA
    #1214
    Scallop potato roll - I know it looks horrible and oily but it was really super good. Try it out. We made half recipe.




    2019-05-19 18.20.39.jpg
     
  15. Zenithal macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #1215
    It looks fine. In a lot of food production, they blot excess oil using blotting paper. Or crumpled parchment. I personally prefer using unbleached coffee filters for soaking up any remnant oils that make an otherwise aesthetic dish look bad.
     
  16. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1216
    The pasta all'amatriciana was started off with a classic soffritto - very finely diced celery, carrot and onion, sautéed in a mix of olive oil and butter; to that was added the best part of a head of garlic (also very finely diced), and some chilli.

    When they softened, I added in plenty of diced pancetta and a few chopped bacon rashers, and let them become a little crisp. And then, this was followed by a glass of white wine, once the meat had softened, followed by an Italian tin of tomatoes, already seasoned with sea salt, ground back pepper, and a half a teaspoon of sugar.

    I let this bubble away, at a slow simmer for around 40 minutes, and then prepared the pasta to be served with it.
     
  17. Gutwrench thread starter Contributor

    Gutwrench

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    Jan 2, 2011
    #1217
    If all goes well, tonight: pan seared chicken hearts with leaks and carrots, and grilled parmesan polenta topped with roasted tomatoes.
     
  18. RootBeerMan macrumors 65816

    RootBeerMan

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    #1218
    Having welfare dinner at the kids request. Mac and cheese (boxed) with tuna tossed in. Sounds terrible, but really is quite tasty.
     
  19. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1219
    Sounds tasty.

    How will you prepare the leeks and carrots? I find that sautéing them (slowly) with garlic works wonders.

    Mine own repast was yesterday's all'amatriciana (the flavours even better as they had had a night to blend) with freshly cooked pasta dressed in olive oil and black pepper.
     
  20. anika200 macrumors member

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    Feb 15, 2018
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    USA
    #1220
    Wow that Ras el Hanout seasoning looks amazing plus I am not sure I ever had a flank steak. Will have to ask my butcher if he can cut one for me.
    --- Post Merged, May 23, 2019 ---
    What a great description, I can never get enough ramps in the spring. I dry the tops to use as seasoning the rest of the year unfortunately they are all over with here now, bummer.
     
  21. RootBeerMan macrumors 65816

    RootBeerMan

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    Jan 3, 2016
    #1221
    If your butcher doesn't have a flank steak, you need a new butcher! That's a really common cut, even though some places don't carry them often. If you have a Sam's Club nearby you can get a good deal on them (as well as other meats and fish!). Just remember to never cook it past medium, on a grill, and to always cut it on a bias. It's a pretty forgiving cut, otherwise. If you don't want to try making the Ras el Hanout, you can do as I do and order it from Amazon. I like the mix from Zamouri Spices, (as well as many of their other Middle Eastern spices). They have two sizes, 2 and 4 oz.
     
  22. Scepticalscribe macrumors Westmere

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1222
    Brilliant description, but I suspect that you may still be referring to what we call ramsons (in other words, wild garlic).
     
  23. anika200 macrumors member

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    Feb 15, 2018
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    USA
    #1223
    It does look very similar but if you look at the flowers of Ramsons and WV leaks/ramps they are different. If it follows all other flowering plants things then it is probably different but I am only amateur.

    USA Ramp or Leek

    iu.jpeg

    Below is picture of Ramsons flowers

    Allium_ursinum0.jpg
     
  24. Gutwrench thread starter Contributor

    Gutwrench

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2011
    #1224
    Garlic scapes? I look forward to late spring when they’re in season and can be found at the farmer’s market. They’re particularly good for breakfast in scrambled eggs.
     
  25. Zenithal, May 23, 2019
    Last edited: May 23, 2019

    Zenithal macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2009
    #1225
    No. They're in the same genus, but they're wildly different in looks and flavor. I've had both.
    --- Post Merged, May 23, 2019 ---
    No. Garlic scapes are the tender soft shoot portion of a traditional garlic. They're nigh impossible to find here unless you head to a farmer's market. If you drive around NorCal farms, you'll see the garlic fields from the highway and if you have a window rolled down you can smell it in the air. I imagine the tender shoots are cut up by field workers and sold to restaurants by the farms' owners. I've seen scapes mentioned more on menus in NorCal than I have down here.

    I've fancied growing asparagus myself but I don't like it much unless it's pickled.
    --- Post Merged, May 23, 2019 ---
    Interesting use. I dry whole celery stalks in our Excalibur and grind it up into a fine powder. We have a few blade grinders that are perfect for this sort of thing. It's perfect for mushrooms, too. I simply salt pack them whole and they last for years. Grind one or two up and add it to a soup or stew base to amp up the flavor.

    Also useful for buying your own ripe fruit and drying it out. Which I personally use for muesli or oatmeal (porridge). Store bought is fine, but I sometimes pickup on an absorbed flavor. I bought some Turkish apricots recently that tasted like they were processed next to pineapple and blueberries.
     

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