What is your career, what do you do for a living, etc... (could really use input)

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Eggtastic, Dec 30, 2014.

  1. Eggtastic macrumors 6502a

    Eggtastic

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2009
    Location:
    NJ
    #1
    As the title states, what do you all do for a living??

    I am 27 and HATE where I am right now in life, I have a teaching degree (gym, big mistake i know. I went because I had no clue what I wanted to do back in 2006 and at the time it was interesting and it was before the economy crashed so figured a degree in anything would account for something) and work as an aide right now. I hate it, I hate ignorant kids, and I hate the lousy pay that comes with it. I have a girlfriend, she's great, but refuse to propose or even entertain the idea of settling down with kids until my mid 30's WHEN I AM MAKING GOOD MONEY.

    I stroll through some of these forums, and see newer, brand new cars, nice houses, etc. and I hate to say it but get extremely jealous.

    Now, back to me, I want to make a career change but I don't want to dump more money into college as the rates are ridiculous. If I have to, then so be it but I would like input on your careers, what it took to get there, and if you would recommend it in terms of money, openings, and good work/life balance.

    Also, I would really like to hear any career changers and anyone who had a decent job, and left to do something more fulfilling.

    A bit of a rant, but I could use some help from you guys if you could provide any input on your careers, career changers, recommendations, etc.

    Thank you.
     
  2. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #2

    Well, as a start, my first response would be to ask what it is that you like to do? What interests you? And then, I would seek to advise you try to find a way to do that and make some sort of a living from it.

    To be honest, your post is a howl of frustration, and writing about jealousy and cars and houses - to my mind - sort of misses the point.

    Are being able to afford those your goals, or is your goal to try to do something for a living which you find interesting, stimulating, challenging and fulfilling & rewarding both professionally and personally?

    Speaking - or writing - personally, I could never work at something I do not find intellectually stimulating, and challenging and interesting. Money is not my god, and never has been, but a large degree of professional autonomy and intellectual challenge most certainly is and I could not ever work in an environment which I found suffocating or boring.

    As a child I loved history, and later, as a teenager, I developed a fascination with politics. These were the areas I studied at university, and later taught for a living, which was something I loved doing and derived enormous professional and intellectual satisfaction from so doing. However, when I worked as a university teacher, I was not especially well paid, but I enjoyed my work.
     
  3. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2008
    Location:
    Always a day away
    #3
    I have to confess, it's quite refreshing to see somebody make a post like this and NOT blame others/the economy/the government/the previous generation/other for his/her "predicament," as it may be perceived.

    So in a nutshell, you want a well-paying career, with several employment options, good work/life balance, etc. And it sounds like you're willing to work for it - reluctant, but willing.

    I work as a mechanical engineer. The pay is what I would call good - yes, doctors, lawyers, etc. get paid more, but it's rare that I work more than 45 hours in a week. I've also never been voluntarily out of work for more than about 3-4 weeks after being laid off or whatever, and I very often have recruiters calling me, so I would say the field is very employable.

    The downside? You're not going to be able to get to that point with an education degree, you'll have to get another 4-year degree.

    The other side of the argument - what kinds of jobs could you find fulfilling that only require the education you have - is a bit out of my range to answer. My wife is a teacher and she seems to enjoy it much more than not. I'm sorry your experience hasn't been the same.
     
  4. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2002
    Location:
    totally cool
  5. haxrnick macrumors 6502a

    haxrnick

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Location:
    Seattle
    #5
    I'm in IT and do very well for myself and my family. Went to college but looking back on it and the people we hire it isn't necessary. If you're interested in that field I'd start by trying to get a help desk position and learn your way up.
     
  6. nissan.gtp macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2007
    Location:
    Virginia
    #6
    good advice. if you go this way, learn about security, there's no lack of work in that area

    good luck
     
  7. iososx macrumors 6502a

    iososx

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2014
    Location:
    USA
    #7
    Ph.D. specializing in GBCB.
    Genomics, Bioinformatics & Computational Biology.

    A very challenging / interesting career that keeps me stimulated, busy and brings great satisfaction.
     
  8. Eggtastic thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Eggtastic

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2009
    Location:
    NJ
    #8
    thank you ALL for the replies so far, i know i need to soul search to find what interest me the most. I am quoting you because you brought up IT. I did media, television, and video editing in high school. I always had a fascination for technology growing up, problem is my math isn't strong. it's not terrible, but it doesn't come natural to me. everything their is a computer issue or something is needed to hook up at our school, i eagerly jump on the issue every time.

    i've been searching and found with that a few certs i can break into the IT field. Only thing holding me back is the threat of H1B visas (is that correct?), and the fact that i might get passed over for some with the computer science degree.

    so what is your thought on the future of IT and if certs will cut it vs a full blown computer science degree? again, thank you ALL for replies.
     
  9. smallcoffee macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2014
    Location:
    North America
    #9
    What are some of the software tools you use? What is your biology background?
     
  10. haxrnick macrumors 6502a

    haxrnick

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2011
    Location:
    Seattle
    #10
    Honestly, I wouldn't waste your time on certs. The way they've changed recently isn't worth the upkeep. When we bring help desk people on it's more of a personality thing and less of how pretty their resume is. I want to make sure you can get along with the team. Everyone is there to help each other so if there are things you don't know, there's always someone else there who can step in and show/help you.

    I don't think you would have to worry too much about someone with a CS degree going after help desk. Like I said, start low and learn your way up. You'd be surprised how quickly we've had people move from help desk to either networking (sys admin) or programmer (edi developers) within a year.

    Keep your chin up.
     
  11. jbachandouris macrumors 68040

    jbachandouris

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2009
    Location:
    Upstate NY
    #11
    I guess I live in the wrong state then. I have A+, Network+, Security+, and an MCSE on Windows 2000. I also graduated DeVry Technical Institute in 1989 for Electronics.

    I am presently back in school at ITT Tech as I cannot find anything. I would KILL for a Help Desk job, but most of the companies in Upstate NY want at least 1-2 years experience.

    To the OP: if you want IT, make sure there are jobs in that where you live because their aren't so many where I live.
     
  12. iososx macrumors 6502a

    iososx

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2014
    Location:
    USA
    #12
  13. smallcoffee macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2014
    Location:
    North America
    #13
  14. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2011
    Location:
    República Cascadia
    #14
    You're a freaking TEACHER, man! No more important job in the world. I'm recently retired, going back to grad school, and I hope to be exactly what you are in a couple years.
     
  15. Fzang macrumors 65816

    Fzang

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2013
    #15
    Do you think it's easy to turn to the software side of things? In half a year I'm done with my master's degree (so that makes it BSc in biochemistry and MSc in nanoscience) but while I have done countless hours in wet lab I have little experience with software.

    I'm kind of fed up with the easy, but infinitely slow workflow and would rather use my brain some more.
     
  16. iososx macrumors 6502a

    iososx

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2014
    Location:
    USA
    #16
    It truly depends on your willingness to put in immense effort, far from easy, logical and what one might expect, you've got to have a deep burning desire for it. You may find it right up your alley.

    I consider myself blessed given the fact that I'm exceptionally fast, accurate and skilled in several of the disciplines required for the software creation I do. Yet I should mention one of a few weaknesses that prevent many in my field from succeeding is lack of ability to maintain a laser like focus under the pressure packed environment I thrive in. I knew early on what I loved, was willing to make any sacrifice required while at MIT and mastered a fierce level of determination and unstoppable drive in addition to the completion of all the academic requirements. I absolutely love what I do, yet I'm sure some think I'm far too focused on it... :)
     
  17. Interceptor macrumors newbie

    Interceptor

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2004
    #17
    I went to school for nursing not knowing about what I wanted to do in life. I thought nursing was a good idea because I could do many things with it like medical sales, visiting nurse, ER, etc. Seemed exciting enough and not a desk job since I have horrible ADHD. I always liked helping people and being the "go to" person when family and friends needed anything. My hobby however has always been computers. I feel like medical and IT are the 2 best areas of tremendous opportunity.

    I started my small IT company about 15 years ago with no certs or degree in IT as side jobs and then took it seriously about 7 years ago. I went completely on my own about 4 years ago. Working for yourself is hard but it gives you the opportunity to own something that you can mold and grow.

    One last thing, a close friend of mine got a poli-sci degree and worked a horrible job for about 7 years out of college then he snapped. He quit his job due to the stress and the fear of always loosing his job. He went to nursing school, got his masters in anesthesia and is making $130K. Plenty of jobs and he works 4 days a week.

    It's late and I saw your post and I wanted to reply, but your mental situation hit very close to home. Sorry if I am all over the place in my repsonse and I wish you the very best. Remember you have so many options don't stress. Good luck!

    P.S. if you do go back to school think state school!
     
  18. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Location:
    St. Louis, MO
    #18
    People with CS degrees aren't going to be working in helpdesk/sys admin jobs, which it sounds like you're interested in.

    Programmers/developers are usually CS people. Or people like me who did MIS because they didn't want to be a programmer for a living but ended up being a programmer for a living anyways.
     
  19. brentmore macrumors 6502

    brentmore

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    Location:
    New York
    #19
    I'm a military officer currently assigned in a research and teaching role at one of the academies. When I started college, I thought I'd be a physicist for sure. That failed miserably and the subsequent drop out was the best thing that happened to me. I later enlisted, was sent back to college anyway, studied something I loved, and the rest is history. Bottom line is that it didn't happen on the first shot - sometimes it takes a 'failure' to help you find the right path.
     
  20. dirtylilhobo macrumors newbie

    dirtylilhobo

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2014
    Location:
    At home
    #20
    You're twenty seven with a teaching degree! That's miles above where I was at your age several decades ago.

    I had gotten out of the Army and Vietnam but I wasn't sure of what to do. All I had was high school. I had a strong interest in aviation and had gotten a pilot license during high school so I went about flight training to commercial flight and on the mechanical side too. The idea was to become an airline pilot. But, applied also to the FAA to be an air traffic controller and got that job. After four years of intensive training finally became an FPL controller.

    Several years later I became interested in the automation side of air traffic and got promoted to an automation specialist. I was so enthralled with the job I finally went to college and got a BS Computer Science degree at age 46. I was with the FAA for over thirty-six years then retired.

    I moved on to a railroad and became a locomotive engineer simply because I also had a long lived interest in railroading and wanted something completely different to do then retired from that also after several years.

    The thing is you never know what opportunities will arise. I'd take stock of my strong interests and look at where I am vs where I want to be ten or fifteen years from now. I'd be looking for employment in the field that interests me the most. I'd be looking for that high paying career that I felt so passionate about that I'd do whatever it took to get there..

    I'm completly retired now so I don't worry about career anymore. I wish you luck and great success in your search..
     
  21. SurferMan macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    May 14, 2010
    Location:
    South FL
    #21
    32 self employed and always have been basically lol. Was even in sales in high school. I only tried "corporate" twice after college and wasn't for me, I want to do my own thing and not follow "procedures" even though at one place I out layed a plan that was more efficient and would show to be more profitable b/c I was a rookie and don't know better (came to find out like a year later they implemented it, morons). No patience for corporate red tap bs. Started a few companies and sold, main one started as a mortgage company that morphed more into commercial and business and then morphed more into consulting. Started another company now in consulting in online marketing (not the normal seo bs companies spell).

    Funny thing is when I thought about it, almost everyone that I know of that is successful whether family or not, never went to college and some own huge businesses with hundreds and into thousands of employees. Meanwhile I have friends with student loans up the ass especially from doctorates and masters etc, and make crap for $. My wife is in psychology and has her doctorate and everything, along with about 190k in student loans, she's maxed out in her field actually paid quite higher then normal (about 90k). She'll be opening her own practice this year, one not only more money, but a lot more time flexibility and not the hour commute she has.
     
  22. Eggtastic thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Eggtastic

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2009
    Location:
    NJ
    #22
    Thank you for the response. Glad things worked out for you. Just curious, you said you went for nursing but started an IT company? Did you ever work in a nursing setting or end up in IT instead?

    Thanks!

    ----------

    Thank you for the reply. Your first sentence hits home, it's just when you see most friends on facebook and what not living a successful life, traveling, etc it just makes it seem I am way behind. Thanks for the input and nice to see you followed your passions. I need to do some soul searching.
     
  23. OneMike macrumors 601

    OneMike

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    #23
    That is great advise and what I came in to say.

    The first step is to figure out what it is you would like to do. Don't let money be the motivator in that decision. What would you really like to do money aside?

    Otherwise in the future your thread will be I make great money but hate my job. What should I do?

    I'm software engineer and before I had that as a career I did it for free in my spare time. I make good money but beyond that I'm happy and look forward to each day.

    Don't really look at nice cars and get jealous. Look at it from the flip as motivation and say why not me? Also understand regardless of salary many have nice things but can't really afford them. I've seen people who make low wages live check to check and doctors with condos across the street from the Airlines Arena in the same boat.
     
  24. sliceoftoast macrumors 6502

    sliceoftoast

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2012
    Location:
    In a Toaster
    #24
    Have been in the IT industry for 10 years, can be very challenging and you're forever learning trying to keep up with the changing hardware / software.
     
  25. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    Location:
    Toronto, Ontario
    #25
    Im a web developer, and also serve as a system admin for the most part. I love my job but I work in capital markets so it's a bit more revenue driven than I would like (can't do anything cool without having a plan to monetize first).

    I'm hoping to break out into my own contracting company later in the year.

    As for your situation, I was in a similar mindset not too long ago and then went back to school making sure that my prior degree would mesh somehow into my new one. Worked out extremely well for me and am hoping to start a masters program next summer. The hardest part was getting started, it's way too easy to become complacent.
     

Share This Page