What Macbook Pro do you have and what temps are you getting?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by red321red321, Dec 10, 2013.

  1. red321red321 macrumors regular

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    Jun 3, 2013
    #1
    What Macbook Pro do you have and what temps are you getting?
     
  2. Laco macrumors 6502

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    Apr 23, 2008
    #2
    No. (because I know exactly where this is going: complaining or worrying that my computer is too hot when in 99.9999% of cases it is not!)
     
  3. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #3
    Knowing what temps others are getting is useless, as everyone runs different configurations and a different mix of workloads.

    If you're not already doing so, use iStat Pro (free) or iStat Menus ($16) to get accurate readings of your temps, fan speeds, etc., rather than relying on your sense of touch or sound. A forum member has posted a copy of iStat Pro that has been "tweaked" to enhance compatibility with Mountain Lion. You can download it here.
    The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel)
    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.
    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.
    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis), or 1200 for the newest MBAs. Older iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range, while the newest iMacs have a single fan, spinning at a minimum of about 1400 rpm. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If your fans are spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)
    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all notebooks in the MacBook line (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best. For Flash-related issues:
     
  4. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

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    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Delaware
    #4
    I know that you have smcFanControl.
    Is there any affect on the temps when you manually run the fans at maximum speed? Let it sit at the highest speed for a few minutes. What RPM is showing in your menu at max (you should hear the fan distinctly)?
     
  5. red321red321 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 3, 2013
    #5
    That is actually a good idea, maybe something is wrong with my temp sensors.

    ----------

    and yeah if I run the fan at 4000 RPM + the temps go down by about 10 C.
     
  6. john123 macrumors 68000

    john123

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    Jul 20, 2001
    #6
    I doubt anything is wrong with your sensors. Of course the temps go down. You're also putting unnecessary strain on a physical component—your fans—which means they'll crap out faster. Laptops are not designed to run "as cool as possible"; they're designed to run as cool as need be. Big difference.
     
  7. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

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    Jul 30, 2003
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    Delaware
    #7
    You could try your hardware test, and see if any errors are generated.
    Restart, holding the D key (for Diagnostics, eh?), which should boot up to the test. Run both the standard and extended tests. The extended test can take quite a long time.
    More info here: http://support.apple.com/kb/PH14291

    Come back with any error codes that you get.

    Are you using any kind of keyboard protector (skin, etc?)
     
  8. AirThis macrumors 6502a

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    Mar 6, 2012
    #8
    It depends.
     
  9. priitv8 macrumors 68020

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    Estonia
    #9
    Also you should try the Turbo Boost Switcher for Mac if you want your machine to run cooler without having to manually boost fans to 4K rpm.
     
  10. trevpimp macrumors regular

    trevpimp

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    Apr 16, 2009
    Location:
    Inside A Mac Box
    #10
    I'm currently using the rmbp late 2013. 8gb ram 256 gb ssd

    it gets really hot and the fan gets really loud ONLY when I play CSR Racing from the app store.

    other than that I think my mbp runs very cool and never gets hot.

    well see what more I get in the future.
     
  11. red321red321 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 3, 2013
    #11
    I ran both the short and long test and got no issues.
     
  12. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

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    Delaware
    #12
    I asked about a keyboard protector because Mac laptops dissipate at least some heat through the keyboard. Anything blocking free air flow on the keyboard _may_ also inhibit effective cooling.
     
  13. red321red321 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 3, 2013
    #13
    Sorry forgot to mention that my Mac is completely bare, No cases or covers
     
  14. Jaben3421 macrumors regular

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    Sep 18, 2011
    Location:
    CA
    #14
    I got a 15" Late 2013 rMBP. That's after running it for about 2 hours just doing Word and Chrome at about 75% brightness. I have no cases or skins on my macbook.

    Edit Removed the picture because it was huge. Click the thumbnail.
     

    Attached Files:

  15. priitv8, Dec 11, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2013

    priitv8 macrumors 68020

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    #15
    Check the effect of disabling Turbo Boost on lowering the CPU temps I get, under full-load Handbraking:
    http://forums.macrumors.com/showpost.php?p=18471157&postcount=19
     
  16. undesign macrumors regular

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    Nov 4, 2013
    #16
    Those temperatures are pretty high, but thats also largely in part by the fact that your fans are still at minimum speed.
     
  17. gwsat macrumors 68000

    gwsat

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    Tulsa
    #17
    Couldn't agree more. iStat Pro is an indispensable utility, it seems to me. I have run it on every Mac I have owned going back to a 2003 Powerbook G4. I went through the throes of modifying it for Mountain Lion but ever since then it has performed like a champ.
     
  18. red321red321 thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 3, 2013
    #18
    These temps are sky high

    ----------

    I currently use 4 programs to monitor my temps:
    -smcfancontrol
    -istat menus
    -Tempature Gauge
    -istat pro

    Of these, istat pro gives me temp readouts 50 C lower than the other three. So I would say that for me, istat pro doesn't work.
     
  19. MacSumo macrumors regular

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    Nov 26, 2013
    #19
    I had about a dozen or more rMBP late 2013 15", fully maxed out. I got at minimum 90C when working, and up to 100C. Keyboard was hot and not usable for me.

    Apple is horrible at designing proper cooling.
     
  20. john123 macrumors 68000

    john123

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    Jul 20, 2001
    #20
    Actually, no, they are not. They are within normal tolerances for the CPU. There is not a single thing wrong with them.

    Incorrect again. iStat reports temperatures for the heatsink on the CPU, not on the die themselves. Its value is correct for what it is reporting.

    As has already been demonstrated in the thread you created on this issue, the cooling is fine. The heatsink could be better designed, and the thermal paste could be of higher quality and better applied, but there is not a "problem" in any way, manner, shape, or form.
     
  21. red321red321 thread starter macrumors regular

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    #21
    That person is getting 100 C on his CPU while running Word and Chrome, and you are saying that is absolutely normal?
     
  22. john123 macrumors 68000

    john123

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    Jul 20, 2001
    #22
    Probably. We don't know whether he has the dGPU, but either way, Chrome can be brutal and, if he has the high-end model, will fire up the dGPU. If Chrome means a bunch of Flash-intensive stuff running plus Hulu/Netflix/etc., temps can spike. If he posts something where he's not running anything for a while, and those numbers look abnormal, then something may be wrong. But using the word "Chrome" as if it were synonymous with "low load" is silly and wrong.
     
  23. Jaben3421, Dec 12, 2013
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2013

    Jaben3421 macrumors regular

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    CA
    #23
    Sorry if I forgot to clarify, that's fahrenheit.

    I have the dGPU, but it wasn't running.
     
  24. AllergyDoc macrumors 65816

    AllergyDoc

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    Mar 17, 2013
    Location:
    Utah, USA
    #24
    I have a 13" rMBP w/16 GB and 516 GB. The only time it gets hot is when we're watching something on Netflix, after about 20 minutes. I don't game.
     
  25. john123 macrumors 68000

    john123

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2001
    #25
    Sorry, I'm not trying to be obnoxious by double-checking here, but are you sure? Chrome often fires up your dGPU, unless you explicitly use something like gfxCardStatus to tell it not to. I just want to be sure.

    Can you perhaps boot up your machine but keep all apps closed for, say, 10 minutes, and then post a screenshot of your temps then? That would be instructive for creating a baseline.
     

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