What was you first programming language?

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by jiminaus, Oct 31, 2011.

?

What was your first programming language?

Poll closed Nov 30, 2011.
  1. BASIC

    63 vote(s)
    47.0%
  2. C (or C++)

    27 vote(s)
    20.1%
  3. COBOL

    2 vote(s)
    1.5%
  4. FORTRAN

    15 vote(s)
    11.2%
  5. Logo

    3 vote(s)
    2.2%
  6. Objective-C

    4 vote(s)
    3.0%
  7. Pascal

    7 vote(s)
    5.2%
  8. Perl

    1 vote(s)
    0.7%
  9. Python

    3 vote(s)
    2.2%
  10. Java

    8 vote(s)
    6.0%
  11. C#

    1 vote(s)
    0.7%
  1. jiminaus macrumors 65816

    jiminaus

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    Sydney
  2. thejadedmonkey macrumors 604

    thejadedmonkey

    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    Location:
    Pa
    #2
    HTML :p

    And then I learned that it wasn't.

    1. PHP
    2. Java
    3. C#
     
  3. mfram macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2010
    Location:
    San Diego, CA USA
    #3
    AppleSoft BASIC. Oh, you mean real language. In that case, Pascal.
     
  4. jiminaus thread starter macrumors 65816

    jiminaus

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2010
    Location:
    Sydney
    #4
    I thought C64 BASIC was my first language, but then I remember actually I playing with the turtle graphics of Logo before BASIC.

    ----------

    Doh! I forgot about the likes of Java and C# for the poll. I'm too old.
     
  5. lloyddean macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 10, 2009
    Location:
    Des Moines, WA
  6. lee1210 macrumors 68040

    lee1210

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    #6
    I don't count LOGO because I didn't learn how to really program the turtle. I really started learning to program in AP Computer Science in my senior year of high school. The curriculum used C++. That's what I used when I started college then moved to Java. While in school I picked up perl, C, Haskell, some Lisp, some of a few ASMs, and probably some others. Afterwards at my first job I learned more C, a lot more perl, shell, Fortran, JavaScript, and maybe others. Now I'm mostly working in Java. Along the way I've seen some python and ruby, learned Objective-C, and may have dabbled in or researched a number of others I'm forgetting. Figuring out a new language is pretty enjoyable if you have some decent code to read.

    -Lee
     
  7. jiminaus thread starter macrumors 65816

    jiminaus

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2010
    Location:
    Sydney
    #7
    I think it was in LOGO that I developed my skills in problem analysis and techniques like divide'n'conquer.

    I learnt LOGO in primary school. The teacher would give us worksheets with pictures on them, eg a house. We had to write a sequence of LOGO commands that would produce that picture.

    It seems I owe my primary school computer teacher a lot. :)
     
  8. xStep macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2003
    Location:
    Less lost in L.A.
    #8
    I first learned Basic in high school using an HP2000. We used cards that you filled in via pencil and occasionally got to use the mechanical teleprinter terminals.
     
  9. mpetrides macrumors member

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    Feb 10, 2007
  10. Dnix macrumors 6502

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    Dec 9, 2010
  11. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    Aug 17, 2009
    #13
    I selected BASIC (HP2000), but before that I learned the fundamentals of programming a decimal-based machine language using a book that was constructed like some sort of website: you read a page, then a question at the bottom had 3 answers with links to click page numbers to turn to. It was a really effective teaching tool, I find it surprising the format never caught on with anyone else.
     
  12. thewitt macrumors 68020

    thewitt

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    Sep 13, 2011
  13. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

    Staff Member

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    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    New Zealand
  14. kainjow Moderator emeritus

    kainjow

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2000
    #16
    I'm pretty sure it was C using the Mac OS Toolbox with Codewarrior, but I failed at learning anything substantial and later learned Visual Basic in high school. *age now public* :)
     
  15. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #17
    When I started programming, we didn't even have programming languages. We had to train small animals like hedgehogs and muskrats to perform the operations. Some things were obvious: rabbits or mice (multipliers), certain species of snakes (adders), and the occasional repurposed flotsam (oar gates). But let me tell you, it takes a lot of training to consistently complement a hedgehog.

    Then we'd line everything up along the road and run them through their paces in a kind of "relay race". It was much later that electromechanical relays were invented, but by then the term "relay computer" was already long established.
     
  16. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2009
    #18
    The most time-consuming part involved exterminating the fleas?
     
  17. Macman45 macrumors demi-god

    Macman45

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    Location:
    Somewhere Back In The Long Ago
    #19
    Basic

    Then something called "mumps" Cobol and Fortran after that.

    VB in the Windoze years.
     
  18. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
  19. MorphingDragon macrumors 603

    MorphingDragon

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2009
    Location:
    The World Inbetween
  20. knightlie macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2008
    #22
    Pascal. Turbo Pascal 3 in 1989, then Pascal for Windows, then Delphi. Now C# and .NET, I'm afraid, but Objective-C and Cocoa in my spare time.
     
  21. Catfish_Man macrumors 68030

    Catfish_Man

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2001
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    #23
    Object LOGO! Turtles with multiple inheritance :D
     
  22. TwistedPuppy macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2011
  23. chuckles:) macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 3, 2006
    Location:
    CANADA
    #25
    Object oriented Touring back in grade nine CS, then Sceme in first year Uni, then most courses taught in Python.
     

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