Which Mac Pro models are most future proof?

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by rondocap, May 13, 2012.

  1. rondocap macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2011
    #1
    So I have a 2006 Mac Pro 1.1. It is very fast and does everything I need - my only concern obviously is the lack of support in Mountain Lion. My major issue is that even though ML is not major, future OS releases will be.

    So what Mac Pro models do you feel will be around for years to come? I would guess the 2008+ with the 64 bit kernel, at least the Mac Pro 3.1 correct? Anything that may make them obsolete in the near future compared to the 2012 models?
     
  2. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

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    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #2
    Computers that are almost 2 years old aren't future proof.
     
  3. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2010
    #3
    None are truly future proof. You're looking at this the wrong way entirely. Apple used that criteria this time around. They also mentioned that some of the gpus were no longer supported. Apple has clarified in the past that they can and will periodically drop support for older models. Typically you can count on 4-5 years from the time they launch. You may get longer, but it's not something you count on. The 4,1 and on use the same logic board, so they may lose support at the same time, but I don't think it will be anytime soon. I wouldn't buy anything older than that. If you don't mind doing your own upgrades, the 4,1 can be pretty cheap and it will accept the 6 core if you upgrade the firmware first. The W3680 is selling for under $600 these days, so if you find a 4,1 for $1200-1400, it's not that bad of an option. Otherwise I'd wait for an upgraded model. With the 2008 you'd be buying a four year old computer and calling it future proof. With the 2009 and on, they're still retailed today, so it's not like support is likely to disappear overnight.
     
  4. ixodes macrumors 601

    ixodes

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    Jan 11, 2012
    Location:
    Pacific Coast, USA
    #4
    In today's environment of hyper fast development & short product cycles, "Future Proof" is a myth.

    I buy a fully maxed out Mac every year or so & just enjoy it.

    Trying to time your purchase perfectly will drive you crazy :)
     
  5. Whargoul macrumors member

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    Apr 27, 2012
    Location:
    Denver
    #5
    None. Expect all macs to lose major OS support within 3-5 years of their release date.
     
  6. thefredelement macrumors 65816

    thefredelement

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Location:
    New York
    #6
    It's a really interesting topic, I'm going through something similar myself trying to pickup a 2nd hand MP. My limited logic says to me, we're not close to maxing out addressable memory on 64bit machines and current OS requirements seem to be easily handled by budget desktop CPUs (i5 class chips).

    There's a difference between future proof and supported. Really if your machine can run a recent enough copy of OS X and the apps you use still run on it, it can literally be that way forever, just don't upgrade and hope nothing breaks.

    There are still people using G5s!
     
  7. rondocap thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2011
    #7
    I guess by future proof, I meant exactly "being supported". Heck, my 2005 G5 2.3 and Mac Pro 1.1 are still both fast machines in their own right - but while one is unsupported, the other is quickly becoming as well. (No Mountain Lion and future OS support)

    Seems like the 2009 Mac Pros have probably the best chance out of the earlier systems. I mean, high-end GPU, 64 bit kernel, etc - seems like it should last another few years.
     
  8. GermanyChris macrumors 601

    GermanyChris

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    Here
    #8
    This isn't particularly painfull you know
     
  9. thefredelement macrumors 65816

    thefredelement

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    #9
    I wasn't saying it was, they are fast computers
     
  10. chinesemac macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 14, 2012
    #10
    1,1

    I also have a 2006 Mac Pro 1,1 and have been thinking about the same things. Last week I installed Adobe Creative Suite 6 and there was some warning about my graphics processor not being "officially supported" -- I ignored it and everything seems to be working fine, but that can't bode well for the future. I also want to move to Mountain Lion when it comes out, for specific reasons I can't explain here -- trust me, it will make my life easier.

    My thoughts are that Apple has got to know that there are a decent number of happy Mac Pro 1,1 owners who are going to be looking to upgrade for the same reasons -- current and near-future software is leaving them behind. So this is a major watershed -- the anchor for the transition to Intel will soon be obsolete.

    Last week I went to buy a new machine, but what held me back was not the likelihood of a refresh right around the corner (WWDC?) -- these machines are plenty powerful for my needs -- what held me back was the less-good iSight camera in the current Cinema Display, as compared to the better HD FaceTime camera built into the new Thunderbolt Display (which doesn't work with the current Mac Pro). I use FaceTime and Skype a lot, so it felt like I would be buying out-of-date tech for that. Anyhow, it stopped me from reaching for my wallet.

    So count me among those waiting for a pretty significant refresh, or even a redesign. Something that will work with the Thunderbolt Display, or a refreshed Cinema Display.
     
  11. ActionableMango macrumors 604

    ActionableMango

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2010
    #11
    Which Mac Pro models are most future proof?

    The newest and most heavily optioned one of course.
     
  12. philipma1957 macrumors 603

    philipma1957

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Location:
    Howell, New Jersey
    #12
    thanks a simple truth can work.


    use this for your os drive. it is supposed to boot.

    http://eshop.macsales.com/item/OWC/SSDPHW2R240/

    buy a hex core 2010. and put in a hd7970

    this is a pretty fast machine. can use 3 16gb sticks of ram .

    if you really work at it this could be built for 4k.
     
  13. derbothaus macrumors 601

    derbothaus

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2010
    #13
    ...and Windows only thanks to the 7970.
     
  14. philipma1957 macrumors 603

    philipma1957

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Location:
    Howell, New Jersey
    #14
    drivers are coming for it.
     
  15. derbothaus, May 14, 2012
    Last edited: May 14, 2012

    derbothaus macrumors 601

    derbothaus

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2010
    #15
    Power too? Rather have a GTX 670/680. Lower power better performance. But still totally welcome.
     
  16. Luba macrumors 6502a

    Luba

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2009
    #16
    For the moment disregarding costs, is it better, performance-wise, to use a new iMac (high-end, but not maxed out) every year, or use a 6-core/8-core Mac Pro (high-end, but not maxed out)?

    Considering costs which path do you think is a better value? With the iMac set up, you would need ThunderBolt externals for video work. Need to take the time to sell previous year's iMac at perhaps 50% of what you paid, whereas with the Mac Pro it's one big payment in the beginning.

    Anyway, I know it's a wide open question, but thought it would be interesting to consider and hear the opinion of others. :)
     

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