why adobe went to cloud?


sevoneone

macrumors 6502
May 16, 2010
453
314
1. To reduce piracy of their software which was, and is, rampant. Software that needs to phone home periodically is one way, but making the cost of entry to the software so low, you take away a lot of the incentive for piracy. The cost of the Complete CS6 Suite was $2,600 ($800 for students), that is a major chunk of change to front and big hurdle for someone starting a business or especially for students. So you had a lot of people choosing to pirate the software because it was impossible for them to obtain normally. CC is $50/mo ($20/mo for Students), which is a lot less to swallow in one go to get access. It also works out to be one-quarter the cost for non-students over 3-4 years.

2. As answered in your thread in the Photography section: Having software that is connected to the cloud makes it a lot easier to collect data and usage habits on your users. Then, in turn, use that data to build useful enhancements to the software. Adobe is a technology company, and the future of the tech industry is Deep Learning, Machine Learning and AI. Adobe's been using data from users to train their AI platform, Sensei, to do some of the things those users do very frequently. The goal being to reduce the time it takes to do something like mask an image so there is more for their users to be creative/efficient.
 

bbeers

macrumors regular
Dec 14, 2007
159
5
Maryland
Other than storage or easier access by other computers/devices, none. IMO it was a short-sighted decision. Not everyone has high-speed internet. And not everyone has unlimited data streaming. Combine those 2 and it's the worst of all cloud scenarios.
Just to be clear, you don't have to stream the apps. You can download them once and keep using them with or without an internet connection. They do have to phone home once every so often. Also you files don't have to live in the cloud either. That is a choice. You can download the desktop apps and work completely locally.

There is a huge benefit to working with files synced to the cloud though. Back ups and access to you files come most internet connected devices is huge.

People complain about the cost, but as a professional designer, the SAAS model means I am always update and a monthly payment is easier to manage. The total cost of user-ship is nothing to a professional. If you are not a professional, remember, Adobe is PROFESSIONAL software and if you want to use it, you need to pay a professional price.
 
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Larry-K

macrumors 68000
Jun 28, 2011
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People complain about the cost, but as a professional designer, the SAAS model means I am always update and a monthly payment is easier to manage. The total cost of user-ship is nothing to a professional. If you are not a professional, remember, Adobe is PROFESSIONAL software and if you want to use it, you need to pay a professional price.
None of the professionals I know have ever complained about the price of the subscription model.

As a professional who has used Adobe products since the birth of the company, and upgraded regularly, I've saved thousands of dollars by not having perpetual upgrades to buy, and by not submitting to Adobe's extortion demands since the introduction of Creative Cloud, but that amount is wholly insignificant when compared to value of the work I've generated over that same period using Adobe products.

It's about unfettered access to one's body of work in perpetuity, and a choice about what, when and how to upgrade. I and many others find the subscription system an egregious abuse of the trust we placed in Adobe back When John Warnock was in charge.

If Adobe does bring back perpetual licenses, I'll be happy to spend a good deal more than the current subscription costs on those. Till then, I'll continue to generate a very nice income from my perpetual versions. They're still quite capable when used by a professional.
 
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bbeers

macrumors regular
Dec 14, 2007
159
5
Maryland
None of the professionals I know have ever complained about the price of the subscription model.
I never said professionals complain about the price. Most other professionals I know are accepting of the price, even if they would prefer the old pricing method. What I am more tired of is home user who expect a professional software at a consumer price point.

I have been paying into the Adobe system for 20 years now and have no problem with the current model. I used to upgrade ever 2-3 version, so in the end I am actually saving money. I like that fact that I have access to the entire Adobe catalog, as well as the cloud storage. I chose when and what apps I want to update, and even keep older versions on my station until it is clear the update is stable.

Unfortunately this new SAaS model is here to stay as more and more companies are choosing to adopt it. I am OK with this as long as there are added benefits with the service and other options.
 
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AJClayton

macrumors 6502a
Jan 9, 2007
548
300
Dorset, England
I'm a professional and despite the comments here suggesting that I should think otherwise, I'm not a fan of the concept of renting software. I can see that paying a smaller amount monthly would appeal to some but as a business I budgeted for a large software cost every 3 years to update my Adobe suite and was happy with that until CC came along.

What if I suddenly couldn't pay the subs any more, say I decided to change business model or something? I'd lose access to all my work. I don't like being held to ransom.

As a result of them renting their software rather than allowing us to purchase it outright, I've almost shifted completely away from Adobe as there are plenty of products out there now that are equally as good. Although people occasionally send me files in Adobe formats, I rarely have problems working with them and, on the rare occasion that I do, I still have Photoshop CS 5 on my laptop as a fall back. I can't remember the last time I needed it, though, so when CS 5 eventually stops working (as will inevitably happen at some point) I can't see it being a problem for me.

The only exception is InDesign (I'm still using CS 5 for that), however I'm hopeful that Affinity will keep to their word and eventually release Affinity Publisher (which is, as things stand, running very very late from when they said a beta would be available).

If you're a professional using Adobe and don't like their renting model, don't be afraid to look elsewhere. I did and it's worked out great (and saved me lots of money, which is a bonus).
 

Larry-K

macrumors 68000
Jun 28, 2011
1,855
2,311
I never said professionals complain about the price. Most other professionals I know are accepting of the price, even if they would prefer the old pricing method. What I am more tired of is home user who expect a professional software at a consumer price point.

I have been paying into the Adobe system for 20 years now and have no problem with the current model. I used to upgrade ever 2-3 version, so in the end I am actually saving money. I like that fact that I have access to the entire Adobe catalog, as well as the cloud storage. I chose when and what apps I want to update, and even keep older versions on my station until it is clear the update is stable.

Unfortunately this new SAaS model is here to stay as more and more companies are choosing to adopt it. I am OK with this as long as there are added benefits with the service and other options.
$50 is a consumer price point. That probably explains why Adobe has put so little effort into really upgrading CC.

You're arguing price, I'm arguing access.
 

maanwi

macrumors newbie
Oct 25, 2017
1
0
The advantages to you are dubious, while Adobe, on the other hand, gets a constant revenue stream—no more pesky users skipping versions between upgrades. They also achieve vendor lock-in, as you are beholden to Adobe to even be able to open (most) files that originate in CC. They also collect analytic data that they can further mine for monetary purposes. SaaS is the death of ownership.
 

Moonjumper

macrumors 68010
Jun 20, 2009
2,002
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Lincoln, UK
I only really use Illustrator, which has been one of the more stagnant of the Adobe offerings, so only updated it occasionally and am now still on CS4. I might have updated at least once in that time, but the subscription offering doesn't really suit me. Illustrator is something I only use occasionally, but often enough that I cannot drop in and out on a month-by-month basis, and keeping track of it when I use multiple other pieces of software more often is not feasible. The price seems a lot for how much I use it, and there are more options now. Affinity Designer seems a decent place to look first.
 

AJClayton

macrumors 6502a
Jan 9, 2007
548
300
Dorset, England
Affinity Designer seems a decent place to look first.
I'm similar to you. I never used Illustrator all that much, but often enough for me to want to keep it around. Since moving from CC, I switched to Affinity Designer and it's very Illustrator-like (although as I said I'm far from an advanced user). I even purchased their coffee table book "Affinity Designer Workbook" that I've promised myself I'm going to actually open and start reading over Christmas.

Best of all it's pay once and then you actually own the software and don't have to keep paying for it. Again. And again. And again. Ad infinitum.
 
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kohlson

macrumors 68010
Apr 23, 2010
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Adobe went to the cloud to change their business model. When you bought CS-whatever you bought the rights to use it in perpetuity. And this was affecting their revenues, as they were running out of functionality to include that compelled people to pay large sums (upwards of $2400 for the entire Master Suite, several hundred for individual apps) on a release-by-release basis. There was much user feedback that users had adopted an every-other-release approach. From a business perspective, there are many reasons to have your customers subscribe to your software (even revenue flow, and if done right, more difficult to unsubscribe). The difficulty is in the transition from perpetual to subscription. Adobe was able to navigate this.
 

Moonjumper

macrumors 68010
Jun 20, 2009
2,002
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Lincoln, UK
I'm similar to you. I never used Illustrator all that much, but often enough for me to want to keep it around. Since moving from CC, I switched to Affinity Designer and it's very Illustrator-like (although as I said I'm far from an advanced user). I even purchased their coffee table book "Affinity Designer Workbook" that I've promised myself I'm going to actually open and start reading over Christmas.

Best of all it's pay once and then you actually own the software and don't have to keep paying for it. Again. And again. And again. Ad infinitum.
Thanks. AD sounds ideal. I’ve been using Illustrator for 18 or 19 years, so I’m really used to the workflow, but AD does sound close enough to be a reasonable transition.

My use case for Illustrator has been a bit unusual and varied. It started when I was a game designer mocking up racetrack designs. The splines could even be exported to 3DS Max for a modeller to build. I’ve used it for level design as an improvement on paper prototyping. Mocking up user interfaces. Board game artwork. Video game artwork when I went indie. Mocking up games. Starting 3D models. And finally illustrations for lectures in my part-time work as a university lecturer. I’ll have a lot to test in AD!

So I’ve used it for a lot of stuff, but now I’ll use it a intensely for a week or so, then only the occasional edit over a few months. Subscription doesn’t feel good when used once in a month.
 

jennyp

macrumors 6502
Oct 27, 2007
464
67
What if I suddenly couldn't pay the subs any more, say I decided to change business model or something? I'd lose access to all my work. I don't like being held to ransom.
Not if you're using Lightroom Classic, as well as Lightroom CC (mobile), as I am. All the files stay local, to be backed up, whatever.
 

bobbydaz

macrumors regular
Jan 24, 2009
177
29
UK
For professionals that make their living from using the software it’s just another business expense. Just like insurance, accountants fees, rent etc you just have to swallow it and forget about it. As a running cost it’s nothing. A couple of hours work and it’s paid for itself.

For non-pros it’s a different matter. I guess pick up an old copy of pre-cloud software on eBay and make it last as long as you can.