Why doesn't the new MacBook Pro come with those two clips on the power brick to wrap the cable?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Hieveryone, Mar 11, 2017.

  1. Hieveryone macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    #1
    I mean come on Apple...I'm trying to do good cable management...
     
  2. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Delaware
    #2
    I have never used those "ears", since seeing those first on the first white iBook that I bought (in 2001?). I thought it was a terrible idea at the time, and haven't changed my opinion. I continue to do as I have always done with those power adapter cables: loose loops, attached to the power adapter with a rubber band of some sort.
    I got that opinion from the beginning as I was working at an Apple specialist at the time. I had a customer's iBook, with the power wire wrapped so tight that it had corners. I have always since then recommended to owners the "loose loops" method, and to ignore the "ears".
     
  3. butterburger cookybutter macrumors member

    butterburger cookybutter

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2016
    #3
    Why? Because it no longer has a permanently attached (captive) output cable. Those wrapping hooks were for "cable management", so there would not be a long cable dangling in a bag or carrying case. A discrete USB PD cable is much easier to manage alone, than a dangling captive cable.
     
  4. iCarabma macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2012
    #4
    That's an interesting theory. I assumed it's because in their removing of harmful materials from their cables and cords they have made the cords much worse. This was especially noticeable with the early lighting connecters. I think the cables simply can't handle that level of stress from being wound that tight.
     
  5. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Delaware
    #5
    Nothing recent about that. Like I said, I have seen some power adapters with actual corners in the cable from being too tight on the hooks. That was 15 years ago, and still had no good results.

    I do like the idea of the detachable cable, however. The cable fails much more often than the power adapter itself.
     
  6. monkeydax macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2012
    #6
    The detachable cable brings about more benefit than the clips to help in cable management, which I never used because wrapping them on those clips just screws up the cable joint and makes it even more prone to breaking!
     
  7. Hieveryone thread starter macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    #7
    Why can't you have a detatchable cable and clips both...I always wrap my cable when I move around...
     
  8. chabig macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2002
    #8
    You can still wrap your cable.
     
  9. Hieveryone thread starter macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    #9
    Yeah but you'd have to use a rubber band or something
     
  10. chabig macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2002
    #10
    Or wrap it around the brick and tuck in the end. That's what I do.
     
  11. Hieveryone thread starter macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2014
    #11
    I didn't think of that haha yeah problem solved
     
  12. ZapNZs macrumors 68000

    ZapNZs

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2017
    #12
    Likely a combination of because the thicker cable would be harder to wrap, and over time this feature caused damage to many cords from such a tight, repetitive wrap, which could exacerbate fraying and stress.
     
  13. Mefisto macrumors 6502

    Mefisto

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2015
    Location:
    Finland
    #13
    Also something to consider is the fact, that wrapping a cable, any cable the wrong way will deteriorate the cable over time and cause malfunctions and other nice things like that. Wrapping the cable, for example, around the palm of your hand (or those clips on older power bricks) causes the wires inside the cable to continually twist in one direction, if that makes sense, which is bad in the long run.

    The point being, the loops you make while wrapping the cable should alternate (over, under, over, under and so forth, google has instructions), so as to keep the wiring inside the cable from getting too much tension, and as a result of that, breaking.

    Probably more important on bigger cables, but at the very least good form with smaller ones as well.

    Or at least that's the way I was taught, and I've never looked back or broken a cable since.
     
  14. generationfourth macrumors newbie

    generationfourth

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2017
    #14
    From a design perspective: In order for those hooks to work one end of the cable needs to be fixed to the charging block, and the other end needs the small "U" shaped part to connect itself to the cable.

    The removable cable is a much better design as wrapping those hooks tightly guaranteed you'd need to buy a whole new power brick after a couple of years.
     
  15. Brookzy macrumors 68040

    Brookzy

    Joined:
    May 30, 2010
    Location:
    UK
    #15
    The criticism of the removal invariably centres around ideas that it is part of cost cutting or some other conspiracy.

    No-one considers that it is already:
    • Big
    • Heavy
    • The smallest (and I think only? Maybe Razer has one...) 85W+ USB-C power brick on the market
    I would guess that adding the clips would make the adapter considerably bigger and slightly heavier and simply wasn't worth the tradeoff form a portability standpoint.
     
  16. butterburger cookybutter, Mar 12, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2017

    butterburger cookybutter macrumors member

    butterburger cookybutter

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2016
    #16
    Yes, one may choose to use an accessory to aid in cable management: a little string to tie a bow, rubber band, button and loop (such as Bongo Ties), stretchy belt/strap with button holes (like Dell 5T339), twist tie wire, hook and loop (Velcro), self-sticking tape (such as bandage tape 3M Vetrap). There is a wide selection of fashionable cable accessories including: cable clips (such as Nice, Inc. Snap CableKeep), cable "tacos", straps like bracelets with magnets or snaps, frames to wrap around like a spool or yoyo or skeleton.

    I want to not appear snotty with an opinion "how to accessorise an accessory (cable) is a First World Problem". Some of those retail cable management solutions are really neat. Whatever floats your organised boat.

    Here, I'll tell you how I wrap my cables, manage to keep them relatively tidy. This simple idea does not use any tools/parts to buy or loose. Using your hands, coil-up your cable. Leave twenty cm (eight inches) not coiled off both ends. Then wrap both ends around coil; like a corkscrew, like a spiral-striped pole, like wrapping a ribbon around a wreath.
    coilwraponetwo.jpg
    You can make it a small, thicker, coil; or a large, looser, coil. This is not a good plan for earbuds or similar cords which are thin and limp. Limp cable will not hold its coiled wrapped shape, will tangle. This method will not help manage a dongle parade. (One short converter cable is pictured at bottom left.)
    coiledwrappedmedley.jpg
    Some will prefer to simply tie their cables like this:
    foldedtied.jpg
     
  17. dyn macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2009
    Location:
    .nl
    #17
    Every manufacturer recommends against doing this and even warns you to do it. This is THE way to destroy your cable because you are wrapping a warm cable around a warm power adapter. When it cools the cable will shrink and the wrap will be too tight. This causes increased wear and tear on the cable which greatly reduces its lifespan. Never ever do this with any power adapter whatsoever! The prongs on the older Apple power adapters should have never been on the power adapter at all. They finally get rid of them.

    It is better to disconnect the cable, roll it up and store it along with the power adapter. Make sure you do roll it up loosely, don't do it tightly because, again, that is what decreases the cables lifespan. The neat thing is that this technique can be applied to all kinds of cables. You can use the over-under technique explained by @Mefisto if you wish (it's a bit of a debatable technique, not everyone agrees that it prolongs the cables lifespan).
     
  18. ZapNZs macrumors 68000

    ZapNZs

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2017
    #18
    x1000000000

    With MagSafe, if you damaged the cable, you needed to buy a whole new unit or solder it. With a dog and a rabbit that like to play with everything, I had a graveyard of old MagSafes, and eventually purchased a soldering kit. Separating the two components is something that was long overdue, because the cable generally wears much faster than the power brick.
     
  19. Dougef macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Location:
    Northeastern US
  20. ZapNZs macrumors 68000

    ZapNZs

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2017
    #20
  21. Dougef macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2011
    Location:
    Northeastern US
    #21
    First thing I do with a new electronic device is attach a velcro strip to the cord. I have a box of them in my closet.
     
  22. dyn macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2009
    Location:
    .nl
    #22
    I'd rather use the plain velcro rolls, not the small separate strips because you can cut them to any length you need. Velcro is the material to use if you need to do cable management (especially in racks where it is not uncommon to add yet another cable).
     

Share This Page