Why has Apple made iOS5 so difficult to grasp?

Discussion in 'iOS 5 and earlier' started by robdam1001, Oct 15, 2011.

  1. robdam1001, Oct 15, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2011

    robdam1001 macrumors 6502a

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    #1
    Just as an example: icloud, MobileMe, imessage, newstand, Notification Center; Buggy as hell, no real guidance on how it's all supposed to work and make our lives easier. It's had just the opposite effect on me. iOS5 has been disappointing for me so far. Hopefully, it will be improved upon.

    For instance, I use DropBox. I know EXACTLY how it works and what it is supposed to do; it backs up selected files and folders offsite and syncs those same files and folders enterprise wide including iOS.


    NOT a Flame Thread. My family has had 4 iphone lines going strong since the 3Gs then ip4 and now ip4s.
     
  2. donnaw macrumors 65816

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    #3
    I have been in software development and user support for over 20 years. I think 2 things happened.

    1). Apple developed a fairly complicated strategy with iCloud. It plays nice with some other applications and not so nice with others. Because it is trying to intergrate many different aspects of not only the Apple ecosystem but other ecosystems too there are always going to be some hiccups.

    2). I think this is the most important. In my experience during software development timelines and deadlines become more and more imperative as rollout gets closer. By this time everyone involved with the project is so familiar with the software they miss how complicated it is for 'new eyes'.

    Also, it seems that the vast majority of software development leaves Help files and documentation as a after thought. It's a shame but it seems to happen a lot, even when the team includes staff tasked strictly with this job. They have to be involved in the development because they cannot wait until just before rollout to start their work. But because they're involved so early they are just too close to do a really good job.
     
  3. applefan289 macrumors 68000

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    #4
    That's a very insightful view, and I completely agree.
     
  4. BigDukeSix, Oct 15, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2011

    BigDukeSix macrumors 6502a

    BigDukeSix

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    #5
    I agree as well. I am an avionics systems tech for Boeing. I have been involved in testing and deployment of new software in several types of aircraft. One thing I know for sure, is that it does not matter how much developmental (beta) testing is done, you never see all the issues until it is installed in the fleet and is being used on a daily basis. I have no doubt it is the same with iOS 5. And, the engineers to get so familiar with how it works that they lose sight of what it is like for the commoners.

    I was at the Apple Genius Bar this morning on an unrelated issue, and they said they have been way busy with iOS issues. And, while I was there, they were given a large document on discovered problems and possible solutions. They said that even the store employees were having issues, so at least they are seeing what we are and upchanneling the problems.
     
  5. donnaw macrumors 65816

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    #6
    In software development it's really impossible to develop a use case for each and every possible user action. Especially with tight deadlines. And no matter how hard you try 'dumb users' (as we used to call them) will always come up with something you missed. All you can hope for is that you catch as much as possible and that you missed nothing big. Plus sometimes it just comes down to a known issue but is it a show stopper.

    But I still say really good Help documentation - with pictures - would go a long way. I know that a lot of folks wouldn't use it but a lot would and that would spread the pain so folks on the forums could of more help earlier on.

    I have been project manager on some programs, business analyst manager, test manager. I have worked on over 30 major (and many more minor) developments. Almost every time I would swear we would do a better job on Help but those pesky deadlines and staff limitations got in the way every time.

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    The best thing here was that so many developers had their hands on the new OS long enough that they could provide us with some really good information. I pity the folks who don't know enough to find a forum for answers. And believe me there are many. Those are the folks who go into the Apple stores. Must be interesting working there right now. If it were me, I would be looking for a few days in Vegas at the end of the month, just to de-stress.
     
  6. nebo1ss macrumors 68030

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    Jun 2, 2010
    #7
    If you use google for individual functions you are trying to use there is a lot of useful stuff out there. I used Google results to set up Imessage and Icloud.
     
  7. mcdj macrumors 604

    mcdj

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    #8
    I think the difference with iOS5 vs previous versions is that the previous iterations really didn't need much in the way of a help file. Part of the reason that the iPhone is such a huge hit is that everyone from hipsters to soccer moms (and even their 2 year old kids) "got" the iPhone from the minute they picked it up.

    As Apple has had to add more and more bells and whistles to keep competitive, they're running the risk of tainting the simplicity that made the iPhone the success it is today. Android does bells and whistles…that's what people expect. Apple has always done "less is more". But the emerging popularity of other platforms is forcing them into uncharted territory.
     
  8. donnaw macrumors 65816

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    #9
    You are right, you can google and then dig through all the results trying to find an answer. But a document from Apple, found in one place, would have been much better. Especially with the new functionality and complications. I have spent the better part of 3 days trying to figure iCloud out. Exactly how it works. Not just the overview. I have the time but many people don't and I know it's frustrating for them. I mean that's why most buy Apple products in the first place. Apple tries hard to take the complications out of the experience. But as the OS gets more options it will get more complicated.

    All I know is, if I were in charge at Apple I would be looking at the staff tasked with Help and asking where their output is. Apple needs good, concise documentation out on their own site. Google may be your friend but sometimes friends shouldn't have to the heavy lifting.
     
  9. Matthew Yohe macrumors 68020

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    #10
  10. donnaw macrumors 65816

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    #11

    Agreed. Apple's problem is that Android did put in bells and whistles and people liked them. Apple had to respond. But from what I'm reading iCloud is causing the most confusion. Eventually it will get sorted out.

    I guess my responses were too long. To the question of why did Apple make it so hard, well, in order to move forward with the OS, it will get more complicated and therefore harder. Don't see any way around it.
     
  11. robdam1001 thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    #12
    Thx for the link but as mcdj pointed out until iOS5, a 32 Chapter Manual wasn't necessary/required reading in order to use the iphone AND all of it's iOS features.
     
  12. Don Kosak macrumors 6502a

    Don Kosak

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    #13
    I found this iCloud Help system from Apple very helpful.

    I've setup iCloud for 4 people so far, with a variety of initial states (from Google, MobileMe, Local files, etc...)

    I know it would be nice if a guide wasn't needed -- but as that wasn't the case, I hope this link helps.

    http://help.apple.com/icloud/index.html?lang=en
     
  13. Dewaine macrumors newbie

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    Sep 15, 2011
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    Texas
    #14
    As a Dropbox user for many years, I am loving iCloud. I will admit it takes a little while to really "get it", and it will mature over the next few years. But right now it is still wonderful. My iPhone 4, iPad 2 and Mac Mini have the exact same email, contacts, notes, documents (okay, Apple could learn a bit from Dropbox on the document side of things) etc.... very cool.... photo stream, works great as well....

    Also I have my iPad 2 and iPhone 4 backing up to iCloud.... nice....

    I am such an iCloud fanboy that I threw down $40 for an extra 20gig (25 total) of storage.....

    I know to some the added complexity of iOS 5 is a bit much, but I think it is the best ever.....
     
  14. Matthew Yohe macrumors 68020

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    #15
    Sure, but you don't need a manual to use the features that were present before.

    So... you only need to read a bit if you really want to know other things.
     
  15. BLOND37 macrumors 6502a

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    #16
    i whole heartedly agree- and people yell and flame me and treat me like a i am dumb when i dont get it.. i can give examples of everything the OP says.. from missing pix, to wifi sync not working, to what to do with a notify (tap swipe).. to missing calendar items, etc to no help..

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    agree about the "before" but there a lot thats new

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    at least you are open minded enuff to acknowledge there are those at diff learning levels.. :) i am one of them.. gotta say rather envious that you got them all set up.. sigh..
     
  16. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

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    #17
    I can't begin to say how relieved I am to see this thread! Good, now I feel less stupid, dense and inept. Whew! It wasn't just me, then..... I have spent an inordinate amount of time over the past several days fiddling with various aspects of this. Sure, part of the reason for the amount of time was that it took time to upgrade my various devices (computers, iPads, iPhones) before I could ever do anything new with them, but then after that, I found myself really confused about iCloud and what it was supposed to be doing....and how best to implement it. Also my expectations of wireless sync were different than what the reality turns out to be....and I see that I am far from alone in this. IMHO before iOS 5 and iCloud went "live" Apple really did need to have provided a thorough setup guide with illustrations, step-by-step instructions and a distinct explanation of what we could expect when setting up each feature and what variables we could play with in order to customize things to suit our particular needs. With the introduction of the new iPhone 4S at the same time there was, I think further misunderstanding of the differences between how it would handle iOS 5 (due to extra hardware features) and how an iPhone 4 or 3GS does, not to mention what the new features of iOS 5 are as opposed to the new features of iPhone 4S.

    I think that wireless sync and iCloud backup will be terrific for the people who don't have a computer and who have just one iPad or iPhone to worry about...but I daresay for most of the rest of us who seem to accumulate Apple gadgets and use them all, it's been more of a challenge getting things set up correctly!
     
  17. BLOND37 macrumors 6502a

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    #18
    yes yes! we all found a home LOL..
     
  18. MBHockey macrumors 68040

    MBHockey

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    #19

    Your bullet points seem to describe areas that inexperienced companies would be far more likely to falter in than Apple; a company built on the user experience. I'm not saying Apple is immune but these seem like Business & Technology 101 mistakes.
     
  19. chuckles:) macrumors 6502

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    CANADA
    #20
    At least now apple can issue quick, silent, over-the-air delta updates.

    No more 600MB+ files for bug fixes, which is a good thing for my bandwidth cap.
     
  20. BLOND37 macrumors 6502a

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    Mar 1, 2008
    #21
    if as we seem to believe that apple is built on user satisfaction or what u want to call it. ok i buy that cuz up until ios 5 i loved life and loved apple.. but since ios 5 dear god.. they are killing me.. i kinda get where they were going but its like there's a missing map (or help).. unless they figured we were smart enuff to figure it out.. i had another thought but poof its gone.

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    spoeaking of :) how do we do that?
     
  21. WildGuess, Oct 15, 2011
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2011

    WildGuess macrumors regular

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    #22
    speaking of that how do we do that?

    Settings>General>Software Update.

    Also, I really miss MRoogle. The site would have been a boon for iOS 5.
     
  22. donnaw macrumors 65816

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    Austin TX
    #23
    I would agree with you but you would be surprised how often the big guys fail at this.

    As far as I'm concerned I think Apple dropped the ball a bit here. I would have thought that a company with their reputation for simplicity and user friendliness would have been a bit better prepared.

    All the confusion we have been seeing could have been addressed via FAQs. You know Apple had to have encountered them. Duplicate contacts, calendars, how does PhotoStream work, etc. Each had to have been addressed during development and testing. They just seem to have failed to put out a clear, concise troubleshooting document. Or, maybe I just missed it in all my searches.

    But you know, in a way this is Apple's first foray into this type of situation. So I'm cutting them some slack. I've seen worse rollouts.
     
  23. BLOND37 macrumors 6502a

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    Mar 1, 2008
    #24
    agree worse but i cant cut slack..

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    ok says none.. i thought there was something to turn OTA.? or how does that work?
     
  24. mbhforum macrumors 6502

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    Jun 23, 2010
    #25
    I agree with a lot of this thread. I personally work in the IT field and am pretty technical. That being said, I've been using iOS 5 since Tuesday and I think I finally understand most of the iCloud features. I have had to explain how it all works to my non-technical friends, so clearly Apple has not done a good job of making the transition easy for non-technical customers. There is a lot of inconsistencies such as the differences between what you can sync on a PC vs a MAC. Things you can do in MobileMe, that you cannot do in iCloud (such as Gallery and iDisk), In addition, the iTunes Cloud backup vs Wifi Sync has a lot of people confused. There is a lot of overlap in the new features and it's overwhelming for most. I do think a lot of the people who don't understand all of these advanced features will just ignore them and carry on like they did with iOS 4 and enjoy the other great features such as iMessage, camera/photo editing, etc.
     

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